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2d Game Art Assets - Zombie Pirates

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I'm wondering if there really is a market for 2d game assets, namely character sprites.
I have been working on a game for a while, and my character animation technique is at a level I am happy with.
So I started to produce some animated character sprite sets.

My first set consists of four zombie pirates:
Piratenchars.png

There are 7 different animations for each character:
Run (18 Frames), Talk (13 Frames), Jump (9 Frames), Fall (17 Frames), Crawl (21 Frames), Short Attack (11 Frames), Long Attack (15 Frames).
The running animation also serves as a walking animation and the falling/knockback animation includes standing up and can also be used for death, spawning and the like.

The sets are available in four different sizes and certainly mirrored PNGs of each frame. The M and S versions have no antialiasing and can so be used for retro style pixel art games. (S is perfect for 320x200):

Piratensizes.png

A preview of the animations (L size):

64sample.gif

So my questions are:
 

  • Is there actually a market for that kind of stuff?
    If so, what could I charge for a fully animated character? (non exclusively, so anyone who pays for it may commercially use it)
  • ?Where could I offer the packs for download?
  • Is it better to upload them at a specific site like www.indiegamestock.com, or is a blog like Chris Hildenbrand's (http://2dgameartforprogrammers.blogspot.de) the way to go ?


Thanks in advance,

Dee

Edited by Deeee

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1.There's always a market for awesome games no matter what kinds are they.So you just need to try best to make it interesting.

2.Both www.indiegamestock.com and a blog are good for upload I think,couldn't you choose both of them?

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Thank you, silkroadgame.
These characters are actually not from my game, the technique is a bit different, because I do not want to sell the art of the game.
I made them separately and just wanted to see if people would be interested in buying sprites before I create a lot of characters no one wants to buy or before I invest time to set up a blog and do all the paypal stuff.

My new set of fantasy zombies:

Fantasychars.png
 

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I had a look at indie-gamestock.com, does anyone know if that business is successful? I would have thought part of the point of building a game was to create the visuals... It's hands down my favourite part, at least.

 

If it is a worthy niche, you are going to want to have a blog that is optimised to drive targeted search traffic. Do a bit of research on SEO and then find a niche for your game-stock. I don't imagine there being a huge amount of people creating zombie pirate game-stock out there so you might be able to make a bit of coin.

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Hey, Everyone.

I’m Brad Hatcher, a cofounder of indiegamestock.com.

 

I will try my best to answer all of your questions!

 

Is there a market for that kind of stuff?

 

Absolutely!  We have people from all over the globe buying and submitting assets.

 

If so, what could I charge for a fully animated character? (non exclusively, so anyone who pays for it may commercially use it)

 

Great question!  If you submitted the zombie pirates one at a time, I would probably price them at $25 each to start.  I would give them a few weeks at that price to see what kind of action they got.  If they seem to sell just fine then we would leave the price as it is.  If they are going like hotcakes we would probably bump it up in $5 increments to find the sweet spot.  Going in the opposite direction, if they are not selling then we would lower the price in $5 increments or offer sales that try to highlight it. 

 

If they were my assets and I was going to upload them, I would upload them one by one and then make a pack that contained all of them.  I would probably put the pack at $50 -  $75 and see how it does following the same guidelines above. 

 

Everything for sale on the site is royalty free – that means that once a customer purchases your asset they can use it however they like.   About the only limitation is trying to sell the asset again as if they created it, that’s a no-no. 

 

Is it better to upload them at a specific site like www.indiegamestock.com, or is a blog like Chris Hildenbrand's (http://2dgameartforprogrammers.blogspot.de) the way to go ?

 

You could do both! We are non-exclusive at the moment, so you can submit them to our site AND elsewhere.  Of course, we’d much rather have you only submitting to us because that gives customers more reason to use our site, but you’re the one in charge – it’s up to you! By the way, I love Hildenbrand’s site – it’s a fantastic learning resource with great graphics! 

 

I had a look at indie-gamestock.com, does anyone know if that business is successful? I would have thought part of the point of building a game was to create the visuals... It's hands down my favourite part, at least.

 

We are still relatively new but we already have some fantastic graphics for sale.   And we have artists that are making fairly consistent sales each month.  Are they making a fortune?  Not yet, but they are making a couple of hundred bucks a month without having to do much more than upload their art (after all the work of creating it of course!). 

 

We handle all payment issues so you only have to setup your own paypal account and we handle everything else.

 

As for the second part of the question about why you would buy assets instead of creating your own, well, the easiest answer is that some people don’t have the artistic skills but still have that burning desire to make a video game. 

 

Also, as everyone in the industry already knows, making a video game is freaking hard.  And it can be expensive, so expensive!  We created indiegamestock for developers who didn’t have a big budget, or even a budget at all.  This way they can get video game assets at a very affordable price and put their focus on the other aspects of game design.  We want everyone to have a shot at making the game they always wanted.  

 

I hope that answers all of your questions!  Feel free to ask anything else you want.  I will keep checking this area. 

 

Have a kick ass day


Brad Hatcher

brad@indiegamestock.com

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Thank you, Timothy, creating the visuals is also my favourite part, especially zombies of any kind.

Brad: It is wonderful to have "Mr. Indiegamestock" himself here. I have seen some very nice art on your site, but wasn't sure if people would actually buy it.
But what you wrote sounds quite promising.
So you say you are handling all the payment issues. I read on your site you are charging 30% of the sale price and the artists get 70%, which is quite a good deal for both sides if your platform has a lot of visitors.
Did I get it right that the artists have no influence on the prices of the assets ? (I see your point in adjusting it to find the optimum).

Finally some more zombies pirates to take a look at:

Bonepirates.png

And some fairy tale zombie girls:

Tales2.png

And another preview of the animations (added Dangle and Drop Animations):
64sample.gif


I am going to do some more zombies, possibly add "idle" and "getting hit" animations and then try my luck selling the assets (probably both ways).

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Hey Deeee

Sorry it took me a few days to get back with you. 

 

We will work together with you to find the best price for your assets. 

 

I love your zombies!

 

Brad Hatcher

brad@indiegamestock.com

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Thank you so much, Brad.
I've had a closer look at your site and I will upload my assets to your site soon.
I will have to revise my stock to fulfill the requirements listed on your contribute-page (placing the watermark, resizing the thumbnails,...).
One more question concerning layered source file you request from the contributors: I don't actually have layered source files because my technique produces separate frames in bitmap format. Do I have to build up a *.psd file containing all frames for each animation?

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Finally...
I have started a game design & art blog featuring some of my fully animated zombie characters.
By now there are 15 characters in stock, 20 animations (256 frames) for each of them.
They should cover the most important actions you need for any genre.
More hot stuff to be added there.

Check out http://2dee-art.blogspot.com.

Since this is my first project of that kind, I am grateful for any kind of feedback and if you like it, please spread the word. Edited by Deeee

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