• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Louis3315

A beginner in need of help. Python, and these resources I am using.

5 posts in this topic

Hello everyone, I have recently begun college this summer for Computer Science. I am only taking general education courses during the summers to get then out of the way, but I figure I would start learning to program myself. my goals over the next three years are to be able to program GUI and menus for PC games, as well as make 2D/2.5D games.

 

I know it won't be easy, and that's why I said over the course of three years I want to learn this. I know that I will have to make many small games and such but I am okay with that. I don't expect to make a title that is worthy of showing anyone for years.

 

I was wondering which language would be good for PC gaming that is on the easier scale to learn. The language needs to be well documented and have 2D game engines that support it. If you do recommend a language please say which engine would be a good choice and why possibly.

 

If I get no answers I will probably try my hand at Python. Unfortunately I can't find any game engine that has tilemaps and shaders. I found pygame, but I don't believe it is a full on engine.

 

Anyways, If no one replies with other alternatives I guess I will try Python with these two pdfs

 

 

 
 
If anyone has used them before, maybe you could tell me how they worked for you.
 
Thanks a bunch! I really want to learn tons on my own while I go to college.
 
Once again, please do not reply saying that I have to start small and can't make my own 2D RPG right away. I know this, I am planning to learn for three years until I attempt something of that scale, and then keep learning forever haha.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those books are excellent. I used the second one to learn the Pygame library. Al is a great guy too. He responds to questions through email. You are correct in that Pygame is a library, not an engine. It will help you do common UI tasks like handling keyboard, mouse, and gamepad events, drawing basic shapes, blitting sprites and so on. I've heard it referred to as a 'from the ground up' game development tool. It won't be easy to make awesome looking games right off the bat but I've found it a great tool to getting started with game development programming and the fact that it uses Python was a plus for me. Good luck and remember the most important thing about beginning game development is finishing your games.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those books are excellent. I used the second one to learn the Pygame library. Al is a great guy too. He responds to questions through email. You are correct in that Pygame is a library, not an engine. It will help you do common UI tasks like handling keyboard, mouse, and gamepad events, drawing basic shapes, blitting sprites and so on. I've heard it referred to as a 'from the ground up' game development tool. It won't be easy to make awesome looking games right off the bat but I've found it a great tool to getting started with game development programming and the fact that it uses Python was a plus for me. Good luck and remember the most important thing about beginning game development is finishing your games.

Thanks for the reply! Yes, It looks like a well thought out guide. I tried another guide but it didn't tell me WHY I was doing what I was doing, just to do it. I am currently using Code Academy to learn the basics of Python. I will then move onto these two books. It's good to hear that pygame is a decent library, even if it isn't an engine. 

 

I just want to be able to make a sidescroller, or a top-down game within the next three years of me learning. My brother is learning 3d animation and pixel art (pixel art for me too) as I learn programming. Hopefully we are both doing well over the next three years so we can work on some projects.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Definitely doable. I think a basic mario-like sidescroller can be done within 6 months to a year depending on how many hours a week you can put in. I started learning Python from Codecademy around December / January too, and Al's Pygame book around February / March, and this is what I've done so far using only Pygame.

 

Project 1

 

Project 2

 

Project 3

 

 

Here is a website that helped a lot with planning which games to work on.

 

LazyFoo

 

 

EDIT: Adding a couple of tidbits that I've learned so far as a beginner. Lists and dictionaries are your friends. When you're going through your Python course at Codecademy pay special attention to anything dealing with these data types. For me, personally, camera handling was a killer. So far this was the only thing I had to contact Al for help with. I spent hours upon hours just staring at the camera handling code, trying to understand it.

Edited by tp9
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the link for ideas in the future. Those looks great as well. I have around 5-6 hours left over before I go to bed everyday. I will most likely be able to dedicate 2 hours to learning per day. During the weekends I can go crazy with my time though.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You do need to start small because you are still learning. It took me 4 months to really understand game programming. Every implementation of my first 2D game was a failure and a struggle that took several revisions to have good coding style to be efficient. Before that, I did not know anything about game programming.

 

My advice: Start small and keep programming everyday and understand a little bit of it daily as you go. Good luck.  

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0