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      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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Ckosmoe

i want to make games for people to be happy but don't know how

10 posts in this topic

Hi there... as you are reading this, there are some things you should know. First, i am new to this fourm. Second, i am a 14 year old who just recently had a serious talk with his parents about life. Now, i have now decided in my life that i Want to make video games because i get to design, compose music, and draw my own game. Though, i do need help in knowing how to make a game, so if anyone can help me, it would be majorly appreciated.
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I know you may not want to hear this but making games is hard and takes a lot of work. You're young and have a lot of time to decide what you want to do. You may well end up making games for a living but don't block yourself off from trying new things because you're so focused on wanting to make games. Maybe, in your high school career, you'll discover you don't actually want to make games but want to be a music composer, physicist, doctor, or what-have-you. Be open to trying a wide range of classes.

 

Anyway, with that out of the way, you'll probably want to read through [url=http://www.gamefromscratch.com/post/2011/08/04/I-want-to-be-a-game-developer.aspx]this article.[/url] It talks about getting started with game programming. You say you want to make games because you get to design, compose music, and draw your games. You may not be interested in actually programming games but in making art and music for games or game design. Another good thing to read through would be the [url=http://www.sloperama.com/advice.html]FAQs at Sloperama[/url]. I'm sure those will be helpful to you as well and should get you started.

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To get started in programming games, why don't you take a trip to the local library and checkout some books on making games in BASIC. You can type the examples from the book into a BASIC interpreter and get lots of practice from there. The games will be simple text-based games, but this can still be a fun and rewarding experience!

 

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/beginner/hh180171.aspx

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I honestly don't care about your age. I know a boy who started programming in a very young age and became a web master in his 17, but David is right. Making game is a lot of work, and this 'lot' is really lot of things.

 

If you want to start making games as soon as possible, I will suggest you to follow Steve's link and get started, or simply download some game makers. I don't recommend that though. It's always a good idea to learn the very basic things first.

 

If you're not in hurry, go learn programming. Some people say Python is a great language to start with, so I suggest you to go with it. I found that Python is pretty easy myself. Go [url=http://learnpythonthehardway.org/?]here[/url] for some tutorial.

 

Learning programming is very useful. It makes you a better analyzer (I don't know why, but this word really tickles me), thinker, and gives you better logic which will help you to make games.

 

After you learn basic programming, go for some library to make games. PyGame is good.

Edited by Sky Warden
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I can't recommend Construct 2 enough for you.  It's easy to learn and allows you to concentrate your efforts on what you like most, music and art.  You don't need any programming knowledge.  There are a ton of great tutorials out there for it too.

 

www.scirra.com to try construct 2 for free

 

www.learnconstruct2.com

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Many years ago, I have started programming in some BASIC language (it was called AMOS, on my favorite Amiga computers rolleyes.gif ).

Today, I would start with BlitzBasic - it is easy programming language and has very good capabilities for making games, even 3D

(maybe not AAA games, but good for start). Here is some tutorial on game creation http://www.blitzbasic.com/Community/posts.php?topic=59509

Also, If you are artistically talented you may choose one or more asset creation paths. Games need a lot of graphics.

For 2D graphics you may start with GIMP (bitmap) and Inkskape (vector) and with Blender or Cheetah3D for 3D graphics.

The artistic path has also the power that you may work as freelancer in future.

That is harder when you are programmer - ok it is possible but, I think most programers are 

hired or try to start some indie company. Good luck.

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Now, I was around the same age when i wanted to start Game Development, let me give you this advice:

By all means follow thew advice above, but above all else.
 
IT IS A SECONDARY GOAL.
you NEED good results, and Game Design / Computer science etc. is not a huge part of Pre-16 curriculum.

There is a lot to learn in game development, algorithms to learn, programming techniques, design principals etc. If you at 14 spend your time learning all of this, you spend less time getting the results you need to get into University/Collage. 

 

Don't' do what i did and spend your free time making games and neglecting your work, SCHOOL is your first priority, friends/Life come before games at your age. you'll ahve plenty of time to learn how to-do all of this properly once your in a Uni. so don't let it get in your way before hand.

Edited by Andy474
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