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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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Pufixas

Is it alive? No. But wait... Yes!

12 posts in this topic

On first read, I actually thought it did what it was supposed to. That is amusing, though. I always wonder when people give a variable an initial value, before assigning a value to it in all possible branches.

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That is amusing, though. I always wonder when people give a variable an initial value, before assigning a value to it in all possible branches.

It's more foolproof in case you forget to initialize it later. It ensures the variable can't be used with an undefined value no matter what.

 

Also, compilers will complain if you don't do this. Most of the time they will detect if it's guaranteed to get initialized later (in which case they won't emit a  warning), but in some cases they may fail to realize it (and in some cases it's guaranteed but it relies on code from outside which means the compiler outright can't tell).

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And if you feel that is just leaving Schrödinger's cat in the box:

 

 
 
public class Critter {
 
    // Given
    public boolean isAlive(){
        boolean alive = false;
        
        if(isDead() == true) alive = isDead();
        if(isDead() == false) alive = !isDead();
     
        return alive;
    }
 
    private boolean dead = false;
 
    private int counter = 0;
    
    private boolean isDead() {
        if(dead) {
            ++counter;
            return dead && counter % 2 == 0;
        }
        return dead;
    }
    
    public void squish() {
        dead = true;
    }
 
}
 

i'm curious if you intended the counter to actually be useful in making sure isAlive return the correct result?

 

edit: actually, after re-reading the code several times, i'm not sure if it does actually fix it.

 

edit2: you'd use a pre-increment on it's own line?  i tend to stick to post-increments if it's on it's own line.

Edited by slicer4ever
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edit2: you'd use a pre-increment on it's own line?  i tend to stick to post-increments if it's on it's own line.

Some programmers see postincrement as a no-no, especially because of the behavior of some standard classes with those operators in some cases (don't remember the exact details)... Postincrement does look nicer in the source code though.

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i'm curious if you intended the counter to actually be useful in making sure isAlive return the correct result?

 

edit: actually, after re-reading the code several times, i'm not sure if it does actually fix it.

Fix is almost certainly the wrong word for that code. If my attempt doesn't actually cause the resulting program to "work", then please take it that this was intended as hilarious commentary on how such band-aids often fail to achieve what they set out to do. I, umm, I'm sure I must have meant it that way...

 

edit2: you'd use a pre-increment on it's own line?  i tend to stick to post-increments if it's on it's own line.

I generally avoid using the increment operators as part of more complex expressions, and I use pre-increment due to auto-pilot from writing loops. Thanks to spending a bit of time with Ruby, I wouldn't mind switching to += 1, at least for integers.

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edit2: you'd use a pre-increment on it's own line?  i tend to stick to post-increments if it's on it's own line.

Pre-increment is never slower than and sometimes faster than post-increment.

Postfix creates a copy of the original value which takes a small bit of extra time.
However when it is on its own line and is its own statement, the copy is nothing more than an address of a temporary or a register, but no instructions to actually act upon it, which makes it impossible for any compiler to generate code to reference it, and without it being referenced any compiler written within the last 276.45 (as of the time of writing) years will also omit the copy operation itself, leading to equivalent code either way.

However, in general, you should prefer prefix when possible, even on its own line, if for nothing more than the practice and consistency.


L. Spiro
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