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Fromfame

Taking almost ALL the credit?

12 posts in this topic

Long story short,

 

i work with a small team and i find it odd how i'm doing almost "everything" (i absolutely love working on the project, not complaining) and i personally think im going to look a little silly on the credit screen.

 

The team's composed of a Concept Artist, a Character Animator, and an Environmental Modeler.

 

My credit is going to look like this:

 

Creative Director, Game Designer, Level Designer, Programmer, Marketing, Project Manager, Writer, Web, Composer, Additional Modeling and Character Animation.

 

We're all doing good progress with the game, i frankly would hate to complete a game and see this wall of arrogance in the credits, should i wipe this all out and just say "Creative Director"?

 

im not sure what to do and i need help from people who have been in a somewhat simular situation, thanks guys!

 

sorry for the silly post.

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It's not silly - it's a reasonable question that has come up before.  You should probably pick the title or category you mostly fill, and just use that.  If "creative director" fits, use that, if the team agrees. I'm sure some of your teammates also perform multiple roles.  Also, you and the team should discuss and agree on reasonable credits.

Edited by Tom Sloper
words had been lost - site hiccups if you use the Del key
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How 'bout: "Fromfame - Creative director (and additional roles)" ?

Edited by Servant of the Lord
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Yes, discussing it with your team is obviously a first step. You are right that a whole litany will look quite ridiculous, but you can always settle on 2-3 titles that most fit and don't overlap too much. For example Creative Director and Game Designer - even though they aren't exactly the same, they overlap here and there. Also, in a small team, "Creative Director" seems a bit like an overkill, but it might be just to my ear. Project manager or Producer however, is a quite different story - it is almost strictly a different role and I think you can include it in credits too.

 

I wouldn't care that much about the supporting roles, like additional modelling, but if I, as a player, wanted to view the credits and see who did the music - I'd like to know who it was. Even if it was the same person that did 5 other things.

 

It's all a matter of choosing the right titles and rather being informative than boasting.

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Tom Francis did something really smart on Gunpoint by using very broad terms. He did generally the same work as you, and was credited like this:

Design, Code, Words
Tom Francis

That tells you everything about the wealth of work he did, but doesn't feel like it because he used intelligently reductive words.

And like everyone else is saying, run it by your team unless your power relationship means you don't have to. Even then actually, it'll make them feel valued and included
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Instead of grouping credits by person, group them by role, and sort the names within each category alphabetically:

Programming
Someone else
You

Art
That other guy
You

...etc...


If you have a small team, you don't need to explicitly spell out all possible roles like marketing or creative director. I would focus on listing core roles, and only include non-core roles like if a person worked *exclusively* in that role. The core roles are Programming, Design, Art, and Audio. Non-core roles are Project Manager, Producer, Marketing, Human Resources, Localization, Testing, etc.
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Alternatively, I've recently seen someone's job description simply being "wild card" (for real!).

You can create your own weird job title if you so wish (mastermind...)

That's not mainstream, but really, I don't think anybody would object to a bit of originality in your credits.

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Or you could, instead of listing the actual role, just show each of your names in a font size relative to your contribution to the project. For example:

 

 

---- Credits ----

Patrick Chasco

Henchman #1

Henchman #2

 

Seems fair to me.

Edited by smr
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Or as another alternative - Given that you are a small team rather than list the credits...simply do a bio for each team member i.e. a page for each team member pops up -- provides some colour about the person and basically enables each of the team members to have control over what they want to say about themselves.

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I maintain that in most cases, the classiest way is a simple alphabetical list of people who contributed to the project, possibly broken out into two or three sections ("team members", "contributors", etc). That's essentially what Valve does, and it creates the fewest fights. Except, of course, that some people think they don't get enough credit that way and insist on being special listed.

 

At the end of the day, nobody has cared about your exact listing on a credits screen in decades. It's a largely self serving piece of the game.

Edited by Promit
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One should be careful to disappoint as few of the readers of the credits list as possible.  I really like something resembling industry standard to avoid confusion, misunderstanding, and offending any professionals unnecessarily.  On the other hand, as mentioned here, getting too specific is asking for problems also because of the way that many positions having evolving, revolving, and sometimes dissolving roles.  tongue.png

 

Discussion in the group is usually in order for these kind of resolutions of credit questions in your mind.

 

 

Clinton

Edited by 3Ddreamer
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My solution would be to just list what is most important to you in the credits. In other words, what do you want to be known as one day? What is the sort of recognition you care about?

 

Every indie developer ultimately plays many roles. I do game design, web design, marketing, QA, business development, etc. But I ultimately only care about being recognized for making a good game. So my credit is simply Game Designer. I'm not saying you can't have more than one credit. I'm just saying pick the ones that matter to you most.

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