• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
kerosennin

Objective C + Java + XNA Vs C++

7 posts in this topic

Me and my friend are interested in mobile gaming. We had released few small flash games before. Before diving into mobile platforms, I would like to know the choice of programming languages. We want to develop for iOS, Android and Windows phone. Which of the following solution will be ideal for developing?

1) Using XNA for Windows phone, Objective C for iphone, Java for Android

2) C++ for all platforms

 

We gonna develop 2D games only. We need to use APIs like Admob and other hi score APIs. Can they be accessed using C++ native calls? Will it take more time using C++ than separate languages for each platform? Please tell the advantages and pitfalls in both. Thank you

 

 

 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Monogame will take you on all of those, in C#... of course there is a price tag on the iOS and Android versions.

Same with Unity.

 

C++ could be the solution that will allow to share more code among platforms.

 

I think rewriting the project 3 times in 3 languages is just silly.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My friend writes code in C++, they use Java & ObjectiveC wrapper to load C++ program on Android and iOS, however he ended up rewriting it for Metro.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

you can use C++ but you will write 10x more code then using a Game Engine that can be Cross-Platform like Unity

 

i heard that you can build games free for Android and iOS
 

i have here a link with all the mobile game engines

you can use C++ ,  it actually depends on your experience , you told us that you've used AS (ActionScript) that is High Level.

C++ is Low Level and every project you're making you have to optimize it for you device.

you can create a framework that can call the Files to create a cross-platform game.

and besides creating a cross platform game in C++ you also need experience in DirectX (Windows Phone 8) and OpenGL ES (Android , iOS)

 

 

my advice is if you have the experience in C++ , try it why the hell not

if you don't have the experience ? Do Not use C++,  use Unity it's easier and faster to create a game same as flash by using Adobe Air biggrin.png 

or you can use HTML5.

 

i hope you can do something with the information i gave you.

P.S XNA is a framework not a language :D


 

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Java is still fast enough by being JIT compiled for your processor and having a memory manager on top of the operating system.

Java's biggest bottle neck is that it only support object orientation so that functional programming look messy.

Java also have a lot of obsoleted things in the framework for backward compability.

For a beginner allocating and destroying many objects, Java will give you a more efficient code by not fragmenting the memory since C++ assume that you write your own memory manager.

 

C++ is multi paradigm, have many libraries supporting it natively, don't require JVM to run and the language is very flexible.

C++ is very hard to debug if you get pointer errors that randomly write to the wrong memory locations.

For a beginner that use table driven programming C++ can be made quite safe if you use references instead of pointers, don't use C-style casting and always check array bounds.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Monogame will take you on all of those, in C#... of course there is a price tag on the iOS and Android versions.

Same with Unity.

 

C++ could be the solution that will allow to share more code among platforms.

 

I think rewriting the project 3 times in 3 languages is just silly.

 

Unity just gave away the mobile versions for free so unless you need the pro features or have a turnover above $100k allready it is a fairly decent option for mobile development, especially for 2D games since the limitations on the free version of Unity don't really matter for those.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If your heart really is set on C++, I'd go with an existing set of libraries like Marmalade or Dragonfire.

If none of those, Cocos2d-x and LibGDX are both free and cross platform, in C++ and Java respectively.

If your goal is to make a game rather than building your own engine, go with Unity. As was just mentioned, Unity for Android and iOS now follows the same basic pricing as their PC version. As long as your annual sales are under 100,000 you don't need to pay them, and if you do have that much in annual sales the cost is pretty reasonable.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0