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Starting out with graphics

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In advance, I apologize for this. I'm sure it's a question submitted and answered countless times and I'm most likely overlooking something, or not finding a thread that has already been through this.. Anyways, I've been learning C++ for a while now, most likely half a year or so at that and I feel as if I have a good grasp on the language. Well somewhat good! I understand things presented to me when it comes to coding.

 

Now one thing that I'm slightly dumbfounded on is moving out of things like text-based games, or simply programming on the console as I make random things. I've been somewhat studying the Win32 API, which I still cannot find a decent book for. (If any could be suggested, or even sites with good tutorials, I'd appreciate that.) But that aside, the problem I seem to be running into is starting out with rendering graphics and going through that.

 

I'm aware of SFML, SDL, OpenGL and DirectX. All of which are good in their own rights, but the issue is more or less wanting to learn more about the last two. I've been through DirectXTutorial.com (Or whatever that site is, apologies if I forgot the name.), and what they push seem to sometimes run into errors, or do not push enough for me to learn much before wanting a Premium Sub. I have no issues with a sub fee, or buying books.. Just the site doesn't do enough for me to consider it.

 

Anyways! To sum this up in a better way, I'm looking for good resources to start out with DirectX or OpenGL. (Websites or books.) The latter of the two for me has been a giant pain. Each time I think I'm stumbled upon something good for OpenGL, it's really outdated. So anything up to date would be wonderful. As for DirectX, I'm looking to learn something from 9/10/11. Mainly 9, seeing as this PC is old and gives me issues as is.

 

In turn, thank you for reading this and everything!

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Thank you, frob.

 

Everything you said does have a valid point to it. In ways, I guess I am jumping ahead of myself to get into DirectX and play with all the shaders, etc. Which isn't the best step in all this.

 

Anyways, I'll toy with SDL for a while and see where I can get. It'll be good just to get some experience in all of this!

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I think frob summarized everything well. If you would like to learn about DirectX and/or OpenGL this guy is presenting easy-to-digest-tutorials in my opinion: http://www.rastertek.com/tutindex.html 

 

I've followed these a few times myself and there haven't been a problem at all so far. The tutorials are built upon each other so you are wise to start at the very first lesson ^^! Good luck

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If you want to make sure that the openGL code you find is up to date then try and stick with openGL ES 2.0 examples, even if you have no intention of working with embedded devices. Everything in the spec is valid for desktops and laptops and if you decide to go cross-platform it will work on Windows, MacOS, Linux, iOS and even Android so long as you use the Android NDK. Also, you can add the newer features of openGL in combination with the ES 2.0 spec code. Now so far as learning the Windows API stuff. You may want to consider just grabbing example projects from all the DirectX and OpenGL project websites and compare what they are all doing to start up a window. Maybe delete out what is not common to them all and study the functions that are necessary to get things up and running on a per-function basis by using a search engine.

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If you want to learn (reasonably) modern OpenGL, then the de-facto "go to" place is here: Learning Modern 3D Graphics Programming.  Last time I looked it was up to date as of GL3.3, but it may have had some 4.x functionality added since.  Either way you'll get a good grounding in the more up to date and less crufty versions of OpenGL.

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