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Goof Prog

Hello

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Hello.  I am trying to write a little something just for personal business.  I looked at free C++ compilers and well the problem is Visual C++ does not legally let me distribute the executable.  Everyone went to Linux to use free compilers.  I did not like them because Linux now has a problem running in a virtual.  I am thinking about just making a "virtual module" with freedos and people just load it on in a virtual to run.  It seems that with all the free stuff now it still is not good for creating the game.  

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Welcome to GameDev and all, but I'm going to be honest and blunt with you right now because I think you might need it:

 

Please improve your posting quality. This thread's title sounds like you're trying to say hi to the community after having just signed up. But then you talk about something and the only response I have is: "Okay." Many of your other posts in other threads are just one or two words, which is far from helpful. Other posts contain incredibly vague, not very helpful pseudocode.

 

I say this because people expect others to act professionally on these forums, and I want you to know that if you want to be well received, improvement is going to have to be made. I want you to be well received and to positively contribute to this community, which is why I am saying this. What you're doing is coming across as trolling (which will get you banned), but just in case you aren't intentionally trolling I wanted to give you some blunt feedback so you can improve before things worsen.

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the problem is Visual C++ does not legally let me distribute the executable.

Yes it does. If you choose to dynamically link against their C++ runtime, then you have to also redistribute their approved C++-runtime-installer (you can't redistribute the contents of their installer yourself). If you choose to statically link against the runtime (or not use it), then there's no restrictions.
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I looked at free C++ compilers and well the problem is Visual C++ does not legally let me distribute the executable.

 

Adding to what has been said, there are other free C++ compilers out there. G++ being one of them.

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Yes it does. If you choose to dynamically link against their C++ runtime, then you have to also redistribute their approved C++-runtime-installer (you can't redistribute the contents of their installer yourself).

This used to be the case but I believe that was changed with Visual Studio 2010:

To deploy Visual C++ redistributable files, you can use the Visual C++ Redistributable Package (VCRedist_x86.exe, VCRedist_x64.exe, or VCRedist_ia64.exe) that is included in Visual Studio, or use Redistributable Merge Modules, or you can directly install specific Visual C++ DLLs to the application local folder. An application local folder is a folder that contains an executable application file. DLLs must be deployed to the application local folder.

I'm not sure what Goof Prog is referring to specifically by saying "Visual C++ does not legally let me distribute the executable" - I seem to remember there are some EULA restrictions if using an educational version of Visual Studio, but you are allowed to distribute software developed in the Express Editions, even commercially (they used to spell this out clearly in their FAQ, but the FAQ seems to have been removed).
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This used to be the case but I believe that was changed with Visual Studio 2010:

I just checked my VS 2008 install's documents, and these rules apply to it as well biggrin.png


So:
*If you use the static MS C++ runtime (or don't use the MS runtimes at all), you just distribute your EXE.
* If you use the dynamic MS C++ runtime, then either:
* 1) you distribute your EXE and force the user to run the appropriate VCRedist_xxx.exe.
* 2) you distribute your EXE bundled with the required MS runtime DLLs.

In no case is it illegal to distribute the programs you make...  wink.png

Edited by Hodgman
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This thread is about software licenses, so I'm moving it to Business/Law. The title of the thread ("Hello") is a problem, though; it does indeed (as noted by Cornstalks) sound like a greeting (not a software license question).  Subject lines should summarize the discussion or question topic; goof prog, I hope you take note.

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