• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
CoffeeCoder

Linux Mint, anyone?

35 posts in this topic

I would now concur (if in fact you are referring to development with MonoGame). It appears that MonoGame does not have its own content pipeline manager, and requires you to still use the original XNA to create things like spritefonts and effect files, then use another (windows-only) program to convert them to the appropriate format, then you have to load it into MonoGame and hope it works and if it doesn't, "ffffffuuuuuuuuuuuuu" is about your only response!

Unity3D all the way for development! I did some tests with some games and they work beautifully on Linux Mint!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

MonoGame has an in-work content pipeline. I think its in the GitHub repo, but i havent really used it yet. Additionally, if you are cloning MonoGame from the GitHub repo, you need to initialize and update the submodules (downloads the dependancies into subrepos) via "git submodule init" and "git submodule update" respectively. Finally, i believe it relies on libsdl mixer v1.2, so you'll need to install that as well (easiest through synaptic "sudo apt-get install synaptic" and then grab it through synaptic).

Also, for the adventuresome, there is ArchLinux. I honestly would not recommend this for linux newbies as the installation is a trial in and of itself. However, it is always has the latest-greatest stuff available. Want MonoDevelop 4.1, but dont want to compile it yourself, use pacman to grab it for ya! Arch is pretty slick and i use it on my lappy... well, not Arch per-se but a more friendly Arch variant called Manjaro (http://manjaro.org). Istallation is fast and easy and it supports Xfce, OpenBox, Cinnamon, Gnome, KDE, and others i think. So if you're curious in trying a rolling release linux, Manjaro is very user friendly. It also supports Optimus hybrid graphics cards out of the box via Bumblebee, so that makes me very happy smile.png

Edited by Net Gnome
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also, for the adventuresome, there is ArchLinux. I honestly would not recommend this for linux newbies as the installation is a trial in and of itself.

I can personally attest that :D ArchLinux installation isn't just an installation, it's a rite of passage.

 

Failed miserably to install it with EFI on my eee 1201PN (I haven't seen the "Fast boot" option in the bios since I deleted Windows 7 from it). Then had a more successful try with a normal BIOS + GPT install. Pacman works nicely enough, and ArchLinux wiki is awesome.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've heard of ArchLinux. Even the geekiest person I know (who works as a librarian/IT specialist at a university) says that he never got ArchLinux to work, and much preferred the ease of Ubuntu or Debian. After looking into ArchLinux, I can say I'll likely never attempt it. :P

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I failed the ArchLinux "rite of passage". Tried really hard both in a VM for practice and on a real computer but I never got past the installation screen. Oh well :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I failed the ArchLinux "rite of passage". Tried really hard both in a VM for practice and on a real computer but I never got past the installation screen. Oh well smile.png

 

It has an installation screen? Try Gentoo. I've never had to recompile my kernel so many times to get some basic drivers working! :D

 

Also, I am definitely looking forward to the monogame content pipeline implementation!

 

https://github.com/mono/MonoGame/wiki/Content-Build-Pipeline

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That "everything you need you must compile first" mentality of Gentoo its quite fun. In the sense of pure madness that is. "Hey, a new JVM update! Better compile the 4 million LOC jvm again!".

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That "everything you need you must compile first" mentality of Gentoo its quite fun. In the sense of pure madness that is. "Hey, a new JVM update! Better compile the 4 million LOC jvm again!".

 

I ran it on a box at my last job for a while, though I can't for the life of me remember why...

 

I finally switched it back to Ubuntu after having to recompile the full system 3 times in a week.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think I'll ever want to have to manually compile my operating system. It just sounds frustrating. This is why I like things like Linux Mint. tongue.png

Edited by YodamanJer
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It reminded me of gnome.  I only tried it when it was first released and it was pretty buggy.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0