• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
viper110110

Handling Messages

10 posts in this topic

I am trying to write networking code and I need to figure out how to structure the different types of messages. I have some bytes coming in from UDP which I want structured as my header and the message content. The header will contain the type of message it is, based on some index (like 5 for a move player packet). I want to be able to define behaviours for individual messages, and be able to treat them as generic messages (myMessage.DoStuff();). How do I get this without making a giant switch statement (or if-elseif)?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For first, you can "compress" that giant switch. For example you could instance a specific data decoder for each header. Switching on the value only and forwarding to the appropriate function. But you probably knew that already.

Register a set of decoders, each with a packet type and iterate on them. As to each decoder: is this your header? The first decoder matching gets the header+data.

This of course comes at quite some loss in perf compared to a raw switch but unless you have thousands of packet types I believe it's going to be a problem only in theory.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can use a jump table, for example. You could define something similar to:

 

struct IPacketHandler
{
    virtual void ProcessMessage( Message& message ) = 0;
};
 
class MessageDispatcher
{
    IPacketHandler* m_packetHandlers[ MAXIMUM_HANDLERS ];
 
public:
    void RegisterHandler( IPacketHandler *packetHandler, int messageId )
    {
        assert( messageId >= 0 && messageId < MAXIMUM_HANDLERS );
        m_packetHandlers[ messageId ] = packetHandler;
    }
 
    void Dispatch( Message &message )
    {
        if ( NULL != m_packetHandlers[ message.id ] )
            m_packetHandlers[ message.id ]->ProcessMessage( message );
    }
}

 

This is not a complete solution, just to demonstrate what I mean. There would need to be more error checking/handling, initialization etc. and it could be expanded on a fair amount also. This is also C++ code, but the equivalent in almost any other language should be pretty similar.

 

n!

Edited by nfactorial
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
void Dispatch( Message &message )
{ 
      if ( NULL != m_packetHandlers[ message.id ] )
            m_packetHandlers[ message.id ]->ProcessMessage( message );
}

This is extraordinarily dangerous. The message is coming over UDP, it is completely untrusted, and you are not validating the message ID as being within the range of valid message handlers. As an attacker, this makes compromise of the machine almost trivial.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As I said, it's just a basic illustration and needs a lot of checking and error handling added, though no more than any other implementation. There is nothing inherently wrong with the approach suggested itself.

 

n!

Edited by nfactorial
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The approach isn't wrong, but it is inherently more dangerous than a switch statement precisely because of the risk of an out of bounds index to a function pointer table.

 

If you get a switch statement wrong, it will do the wrong thing. If you get a function pointer wrong, it will do an arbitrary thing, and in this case, arbitrary is exactly what an attacker is looking for.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, that's why you need to validate what you're using to index into the table. If you've already validated the input is fine, you can't do anything arbitrary no matter what they've sent you (because you've validated that you can't).

 

There is nothing inherently more dangerous in the given example over a switch statement, as long as your code has the correct validation there (which the original post already points out).

 

n!

Edited by nfactorial
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think switch statements are dumb, because they increase coupling significantly. Every time I add a new packet type, I have to go in and update every switch statement that uses packet type as input. That leads to a maintenance nightmare. In object oriented terms, switch statements break the open/closed principle. I'm not a huge fan of all things OO, but that principle is actually based on very sound learnings.

 

A linear array is fine, if array-out-of-bounds is tested first. You could use a class that automatically does this, to make safety a standard feature.

 

Another option is a hash table. Hash tables are great because the actual range of the command ID doesn't matter. You can use command IDs 1, 12, and 1337, without wasting any space in the heap. There is a small constant cost involved in following the hash-table links, though, which you avoid in the array case. If that small constant cost actually matters in profiling, you're probably building a router/firewall/switch, rather than a game server, though :-)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So here's what I ended up doing:

 

I used a Dictionary to look up my message types. I store the dictionary as static in the abstract Message class. I also have a static constructor in each child message class which adds it to the dictionary. The dictionary stores event handlers which call a static method in the child message to create an instance of the message. The instance of the message is then stored in the event args and returned through there, for the calling class to call Message.DoStuff().

 

I suppose I could simplify it by having the event call a static method to actually perform the actions as I am already passing in my header and the data through the event argument.

 

Once I get something more game like, I will also implement it as a switch statement and see which performs better.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

By the way: Now that you have message dispatch working, the next thing you're going to want to do is to pack many messages into a single UDP datagram. Unless your game is very slow-paced and users only send a single message per second or less, that's likely to be needed.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

C# reflection based example

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Reflection;

namespace Server
{
    //game message
    class Message
    {
        public byte[] Data { get; set; }

        public byte Opcode { get; set; }
    }


    interface IMessageHandler
    {
        void DoMessage(Message message);
    }

    internal class OpcodeAttribute : Attribute
    {
        //or enum
        public byte Opcode { get; set; }

        public OpcodeAttribute(byte opcode)
        {
            Opcode = opcode;
        }
    }

    [Opcode(5)]
    class WalkMessageHandler : IMessageHandler
    {
        public void DoMessage(Message message)
        {
            byte[] bytes = message.Data;
            //todo parse message 
        }
    }


    class MessageHandlerBucket
    {
        private readonly Dictionary<byte,IMessageHandler> _handlers = new Dictionary<byte, IMessageHandler>();

        /// <summary>
        /// 
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="handlersAssembly">all hanlders in one assembly in this case</param>
        public MessageHandlerBucket(Assembly handlersAssembly)
        {
            IEnumerable<Type> types = handlersAssembly.GetTypes().Where(x => x.IsSubclassOf(typeof (IMessageHandler)));
            foreach (var type in types)
            {
                object opcode = type.GetCustomAttributes(typeof (OpcodeAttribute), true).FirstOrDefault();
                if (opcode == null)
                    continue;
                var opcodeAttribute = (OpcodeAttribute) opcode;
                byte code = opcodeAttribute.Opcode;
                var handler = (IMessageHandler) Activator.CreateInstance(type);
                _handlers.Add(code, handler);
            }
        }


        public void Handle(Message message)
        {
            byte opcode = message.Opcode;
            IMessageHandler handler = _handlers[opcode];
            if(handler== null) return;//or throw
            handler.DoMessage(message);
        }
    }
}
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0