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MzDay

C++ programing book and game developing

31 posts in this topic

Hey,

I am looking for a book (or more) for c++ that teach me the language from the beginning to the point where i should be an "expert" on it. (does not matter if i need more then one book i will learn it :) )

 

And if you guys could give me a book that would be good on game developing (I will use Opengl if that matter) that would help me move on.

 

i know that basics of c++ but i dont think i know enough, I really want a book that cover's everything that i should know.

 

 

thanks a lot for your help!

 

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thanks, i dont really have an access to see the books because in my city there isnt really a "computer" section, and i am pretty sure there isnt any books on c++ on my city,

so if you could please tell me what book should be good that teaches the latest c++ version and techniques that would be great and im pretty much not just for me but for

everyone who is looking for one so as I.

 

i will order from Amazon if that's possible and i would like to order the second book you suggested too so i will look for a book too if you guys cant find one and i will update you guys here :)

 

thanks for your help and i hope you will keep helping me and other's :)

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I think i order the Primer Plus 5th Edition but i dont really know what is better, should i order that book or c++ for the impatient?

thanks for the help really!

 

i dont need a book from the complete beginning but thanks! :)

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im going to order "C++ For The Impatient" for 63$ and i found a full pdf version of Primer Plus 5th Edition,

the primer plus 5th is a problem for me to buy because it will ship only in 5 weeks (not including the time it will take to get to my city) and it cost double if i select a faster delivery..

Thanks a lot for the help ! :)

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i do have prior experience :)

Yeah lol.. i think the 5 weeks thing is because im from Israel.

 

i hope i did a good choice by ordering this one :P

 

thanks for your help!

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MzDay: I'd sincerely advise you *AGAINST* getting "C++ Primer Plus" by Stephen Prata, it's an AWFUL book which is only going to teach you bad practices, which you then are going to have to un-learn. This will only slow you down when trying to write your own mini-projects on the side (and taking this active approach is *the* way to learn, reading is necessary but not sufficient) and you're only going to waste your time this way.

 

I'd definitely recommend getting "C++ Primer, 5th Edition" by Stanley B. Lippman, Josée LaJoie, Barbara E. Moo instead.

Even just going through Part I of it (only 305 pages, I think that's shorter than any other book suggested here? with Part II it's still less 500 pages and covers tons more stuff than most books of even larger size) is better for starters than reading _entire_ "C++ Primer Plus" by Stephen Prata.

 

If you want to have a complete book which is short and you're fine with getting something pre-C++11 (some books suggested here were published in 2010 or earlier), then it's much better to go with "Accelerated C++ Practical Programming by Example" by Andrew Koenig and Barbara E. Moo. // http://www.acceleratedcpp.com/

Again, it's 350 pages in total, and going through these is going to make you a much better programmer than wasting time on 700+ pages of "C++ on Impatient" or the Prata's book.

 

Last but not least -- by "going through" I mean the *active* approach (including but not limited to doing all the programming exercises and your own mini-game projects (start with simple, text-based stuff as soon as you feel ready using the concepts you're learning as you go along) on the side), not just *passive* reading (this won't make you a programmer).

I know I can safely recommend  "C++ Primer, 5th Edition" or "Accelerated C++", since their programming exercises are pretty good, too (in fact, perhaps the ones in the second one are somewhat better -- "AC++" has fewer but more "ambitious" exercises, some of which are mini-programming projects (which is a good thing!), "C++P" has more exercises but many of them are very minimal -- it all depends on your individual preferred learning style, though, I suppose). I didn't see other books praised for their practical aspects -- which IMHO should tell you something.

Edited by Matt-D
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I actually ordered already C++ for Impatient and i dont really mind reading 700 pages.

i will practice and make mini projects and games :)
 

um.. you think the book i ordered isnt that good? i mean, will it teach me every thing i need to know on c++? (of course not everything but at least what i need)

 

after reading this book i will order the Effective C++ book and on the way will make mini games and try to improve them in time :)

by the way, i got the book "Opengl programming guide 8th edition" that just came out and i will learn from it Opengl, do you think its good? or should i learn from other book or a good tutorial from the web?

 

thanks!

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none of it is complete it..

what about the book i got? its not good?

thanks

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Don't worry, the book you got is fine.

The only book that people are saying is bad is C++ Primer Plus, which has a very similar title to C++ Primer, which is the other book I recommended to you.
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Have a look at www.MarekKnows.com and follow along with the video tutorials to help you learn to program in C++ and make games.

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If you're a beginner I say start with C++ Primer Plus for a C++ book. http://www.amazon.com/Primer-Plus-Edition-Developers-Library/dp/0321776402/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1371615847&sr=8-1&keywords=c%2B%2B+Primer+Plus

 

If you want to learn 3D Graphics I suggest for DirectX any book by Frank D. Luna http://www.amazon.com/Introduction-3D-Game-Programming-DirectX/dp/1936420228/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1371615896&sr=1-1&keywords=3d+game+programming+with+direct+x

 

Or the OpenGL SuperBible 6th Edition (I've read the preview edition best OpenGL book for beginners): http://www.amazon.com/OpenGL-SuperBible-Comprehensive-Tutorial-Reference/dp/0321902947/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1371615959&sr=1-1&keywords=Opengl+Superbible

 

OpenGL DirectX tutorials online: www.rastertek.com

 

OpenGL 4.0 Tutorials:

opengl-tutorial.org

 http://ogldev.atspace.co.uk/index.html

 

Opengl 4.2 Tutorial:

http://antongerdelan.net/opengl/

 

An indepth look at computer graphics using opengl 3.3: http://www.arcsynthesis.org/gltut/

 

You'll need some math books but both the directx and opengl book will point you in the right direction for that in the reference section. Make sure you focus on learning the language c++ first though, and write some small applications yourself (practice) They don't have to be complicated, but make sure you understand those concepts as you're learning. Programming is a big undertaking and it goes much deeper than what you'll get form your first book C++ Primer. But this will be enough to get you started Good LUCK!!!

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Hey,

I am looking for a book (or more) for c++ that teach me the language from the beginning to the point where i should be an "expert" on it. (does not matter if i need more then one book i will learn it smile.png )

 

And if you guys could give me a book that would be good on game developing (I will use Opengl if that matter) that would help me move on.

 

i know that basics of c++ but i dont think i know enough, I really want a book that cover's everything that i should know.

 

 

thanks a lot for your help!

try this it's very good and easy but doesn't have examples 
http://www.cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial

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Hello guys, first post here and what a nice community you have :)

 

I would like to ask your opinion about another new kid in the block, called "Jumping Into C++" by the creator of cprogramming.com. Would you  recommend this book to a starter?

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Hello guys, first post here and what a nice community you have smile.png

 

I would like to ask your opinion about another new kid in the block, called "Jumping Into C++" by the creator of cprogramming.com. Would you  recommend this book to a starter?

 

Looks pretty bad, to be honest:

- introducing C-style arrays and manual memory management with pointers before std::vector is a profoundly bad idea for a book that's supposed to be for a beginner.

- similarly, using all this cruft to implement a linked list instead of demonstrating std::list first is a similarly bad idea.

- I've also noticed "using namespace std;" in the very first (hello-world-style) source code -- a pretty strong sign the book itself is probably written by someone who could use some C++ lessons himself (while the using directive may have its uses, introducing it immediately -- in the very first program -- before even mentioning its potential downsides -- like namespace pollution -- is a recipe for disaster).

 

Definitely avoid.

Edited by Matt-D
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