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griffenjam

Software Rendering far too slow

7 posts in this topic

I am doing some work with OpenGL on a computer that has no OpenGL drivers. It still works in software mode, but very slowly. Is there anything I can do to speed it up a little. I only have 10 quads on the screen and I''m getting about .8 fps Jason Mickela ICQ : 873518 E-Mail: jmickela@sbcglobal.net ------------------------------ "Evil attacks from all sides but the greatest evil attacks from within." Me ------------------------------
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I''m not quite sure I know what you mean.
My quads are all red. Just to clarify, they are all different
objects, not pieces of one object so a polygon wont help.


Jason Mickela
ICQ : 873518
E-Mail: jmickela@sbcglobal.net
------------------------------
"Evil attacks from all sides
but the greatest evil attacks
from within." Me
------------------------------
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Hmmm... thats a tough problem to solve... HOLD IT! No its not. Software rendering is the slowest thing since witnessing Hillary Clinton''s thought process. It''d take a damn fast computer to display software rendering at a decent FPS (even if there is nothing on-screen). Sooooo, thats solves that.

------------------------------
Trent (ShiningKnight)
E-mail me
ShiningKnight Games
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Wow, I don''t really like that "solution". With a name like "ProSavage" you would think this card would support OpenGL.
Not very "Savage" more like "ScaredLittleGirl". Damn work computers, worst part is the next batch of computers coming in will ALL have GeForce 2''s in them. I may have to do a little switcharoo.
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you could write your own software renderer. obviously the others are quite biased against software engines. keep in mind quake and quake 2 were written to perform well in software even on a computer as slow as 200 mhz. There are many tutorials floating about if you are really interested in writing a software engine, just make it well structured so you can switch between rendering methods and use hardware rendering if supported. You know people are writing software 3d engines on handhelds, software rendering is still important.

On other note, shame on you admin, you spread false knowledge
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Writing a software renderer might be a bit extreme, depending on what you are doing.

Try this:
1) turn off goraud shading (use GL_FLAT)
2) turn off lighting
3) turn off texture mapping
4) use smaller window
5) use the old SGI OpenGL implementation (software only, and its faster than MS)

I did manage to get about 30 fps on a pentium 100 with a small window, about 16000 polygons and lighting, but none of the others.

That''s when I decided to buy a new computer

~~~
Cheers!
Brett Porter
PortaLib3D : A portable 3D game/demo libary for OpenGL
Community Service Announcement: Read How to ask questions the smart way before posting!
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Yeah, simplest thing is to just make the display window smaller... the smaller the window, the faster it runs :D Simple solution since you''re obviously just doing it for testing... similer to my case. I work on my work machine, a Pentium Pro 200 with NT 4.0, and during the day I like to play with OpenGL. I just use small windows to display until I get it on my home machine. I got my terrain polygon engine running 32,000+ triangles (16,000+ quads actually) at about 5-10fps at a resolution of about 320x200... so doing 10 quads ... you should be able to get more than .8fps... also remember, the larger the quads, the slower it goes.

Billy

BillyB@mrsnj.com if you''ve got any questions.
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