• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
TheSyfrX

How do I implement a new rendering engine?

10 posts in this topic

I know that a game shouldn't be defined by its graphics. I think that having "eye candy" graphics, that your game would just be a lot better. I have yet to find a free game engine that looks as nice as cry engine 3. I know cry engine 3 is free, but you must share your revenue if you plan to sell it commercially. I have recently found out that if you were to make the most photo realistic models in a 3D modeling program (blender, 3ds max, etc), it wouldn't matter when you export it to the game engine. This is because the 3D modeling program and the game engine both had different rendering engines. I am slightly confused on what OpenGL and DirectX or Direct3D are. I know they are a set of functions in a programming language that allow you to communicate with the graphics card; are they a rendering engine? I will assume that they are for now. Since this is the case why is it that most game engines like Torque3D, Unity3D, and others, don't look like Cry Engine 3? Can't they all use OpenGL or DirectX and make the same stunning results that Crytek offers? I understand that game engines can't do this because computers or consoles won't be able to handle it, but they should at least make it an option. I was thinking of making my own render engine(something that looks Crytek's render engine) to then implement into Torque3D, mainly because it's a full blown engine under the MIT license. My question is this: How the hell do I, do this? Also, what is OpenGL and DirectX, are those just ways to communicate with the gpu? Which means, I would need to use those to make my render engine.

 

Any help would be greatly appreciated. I understand this could take the rest of my life. I do know programming, I learned Java, and I am continuing to learn. I wish for no hate below. I know this is hard, but I want to try. Don't tell me to use an already made game engine or rendering engine. 

https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/_N3W3ksl-Xiw/TZA7Ykan7NI/AAAAAAAACdw/6ZaudnTIKTg/s1600/natural_lightingip9f.jpg

It looks so nice.

Thank you.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


that's mostly the content, not the renderer making things look so nice

 

I don't think so. I have for the past year and half been trying to decide what game engine would be best to create a game in. I have used the UDK, Unity3D, and Cry Engine 3 Free SDK, I created a model in blender and added in nice textures and materials, and it looked well. I first imported it into the UDK. It looked fine but it wasn't the best. Then I imported it into the Unity. It was pretty shitty. I am not sure why, but it was. Then I imported it into Cry Engine, it was beautiful. It actually looked better then when I first made it. Keep in mind, I did try everything to make it look nice in all engines. They just didn't come out as nice as it did in Cry Engine.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Your modeling app is only rendering that model, and it's doing it in not real time. Rendering engines need to render a bunch of models at high frame rates, all while doing all of the other logic involved in games.

Frankly, the odds of your game making any profit are nil. Just use cryengine.
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 


that's mostly the content, not the renderer making things look so nice

 

I don't think so. I have for the past year and half been trying to decide what game engine would be best to create a game in. I have used the UDK, Unity3D, and Cry Engine 3 Free SDK, I created a model in blender and added in nice textures and materials, and it looked well. I first imported it into the UDK. It looked fine but it wasn't the best. Then I imported it into the Unity. It was pretty shitty. I am not sure why, but it was. Then I imported it into Cry Engine, it was beautiful. It actually looked better then when I first made it. Keep in mind, I did try everything to make it look nice in all engines. They just didn't come out as nice as it did in Cry Engine.

 

Then why dont you include some screenshots of each, and we can tell you why they dont look the same.

 

Generally you'll see differences if the engine doesnt support some features of the material setup you created in the modelling program.  Or maybe the engine is downsampling the textures, or whatever else.   The there's post-effects to consider.

 

The reason that games with these engines look different is usually mainly the art assets.  Second is the effects like shadowing or HDR that may be missing or not as good in some engines.  Then there may be differences in what material properties like normal-mapping that get imported... stuff like that.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A word of advice from someone who asked the same question as you and ignored all the answers: Don't. Just don't. Not now at least. It's not that you're not smart enough or not a good enough programmer. It's just that writing an abstract game engine is useless. I wrote and rewrote my "engine" so many times to fit my new rendering needs that i just gave up.

 

Instead i started to work on different aspects of a game (terrain, mesh, foliage and animation). Now i'm in the process of putting all the code together and building a rendering infrastructure and it's already ten times better than the "engine" i wrote before. So, knowing full well that there's a big chance that you will ignore my advice, please reconsider and don't waste your time. Write games and eventually you'll get an engine.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Right, so, your problem stated is "My model doesn't look as nice in free game engines as it does in my modeller".

 

The solution to this is not to write your own rendering engine, it's to get to know the tools better.

 

Unity for example can look every bit as good as any other engine.  It's all about understanding the tool.  

A default shader on an object dropped into the scene in Unity is not going to look that great.  To make a model look good, you need

 

-Pick a model that is appropriately set up for a game (taking into account number of polys, and setting up good default textures, spec maps, bump maps etc.

-Pick the right shader (Maybe cryengine chooses a prettier default shader... which doesn't necessarily make it the better choice.)

-Adjust textures to be appropriately sized and not too compressed

-Employ antialiasing (again, in Unity, probably not on by default)

-Light it properly.

 

In my view, work with any of those free tools, compose a complete scene, look at it objectively and get feedback on how you can improve it and basically iterate your skills.  It's not ever going to be a 1 to 1 translation from 3ds Max or Maya.  Also, think practically about how likely it is that one person will produce cryengine quality rendering, when it's taken a team of 10+ 4 or 5 years of full time work to reach that level.

 

By all means though, build your own rendering engine as a means to improve your understanding of the existing ones, or just as a learning exercise, because the more you know, the better use you can make of the ample resources out there.

 

Good luck mate smile.png

Edited by runonthespot
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have to oppose to few things:

 

 

It's not ever going to be a 1 to 1 translation from 3ds Max or Maya.

Honestly, if you know exact scene description, you can achieve 1 to 1 translation. Of course this means that you have to employ same shading models, same lighting conditions, same level of antialiasing, etc. The problem might occur if you compute global illumination in 3ds max (e.g. indirect lighting). As I presume we generally want engines to be realtime, I won't give you advice to actually perform path tracing, etc. -> but you can either pre-compute GI, or dynamically compute it using F.e. voxel cone tracing, instant radiosity, reflective shadow maps, imperfect shadow maps, etc. - there is like a TON of approximations of GI ... in this case it won't look the same though.

 

 

Also, think practically about how likely it is that one person will produce cryengine quality rendering, when it's taken a team of 10+ 4 or 5 years of full time work to reach that level.

Honestly, 10 people working on rendering engine will result in bloody mess. Also this depends on experience, one very high skilled man can also create Cryengine like renderer, it will take some time (depending on his experience). Less skilled people would have to learn (and this takes more time), people without knowledge would learn for a bunch of years before being able to actually create it.

 

All in all I must add that the quality of graphics strongly depends mainly on assets. The best rendering engine with bad assets is actually worse than quite worse rendering engine + very good assets, not even talking about average rendering engine + very good assets.

F.e. look at Skyrim, the rendering engine is not that good (actually it doesn't have that much capabilities), but it has beautiful assets, and the result is awesome.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay, let me qualify:

 

1 to 1 scene translation from Max to some game engine cannot be achieved naively.  You have to understand all the ins and outs of the shaders, and basically design the scene in Max with the game in mind and with a thorough understanding of the rendering engine's capabilities to a deep level.  The op's difficulty in getting something to look the same in Unity as in Max highlights this disjunct.

 

Maybe not 10 people, but a beginner, one person expecting to achieve CryEngine rendering fidelity- is obviously not very realistic.

 

I think asking the question is great though, as it opens up the debate and helps establish the sort of work involved.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0