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DarrenVortex

Unity 3D Object Manipulation Mobile Game Development Framework

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DarrenVortex    112

I know I know it's a pretty long title! smile.png

Well I guess I should say Hi first since I'm a newbie in Gamedev.net and this is my first post...

Oh well, I guess I'll go right to the point then!

 

I'm a programmer. I've explored many aspects of programming so I know basic computer science stuff (I'm actually language-independent now!), and now I want to make a game! Luckily, I have a designer who's made me a 3D spaceship in 3Ds Max, and right now all I really want to do is:

 

1. Create an phone game app (Preferably compilable for both Android & iOS)

2. Import the spaceship model (I have it in .obj format right now but max can convert to some other formats as well.)

3. Make it move up and down!

 

I have many options in front of me: Cocos3d, Unity3d, jMonkeyEngine, and similar libraries / frameworks. But I don't really know where to start. I've tried some but haven't quite found the ideal choice yet. Things that affect my choice of framework are:

 

1. I hate Unity since it's GUI dependent, and I'm a low-level programmer (I see the world in text-based!). I don't use IDEs for app development, just a text editor and a Console + simply reading the doc and calling the APIs from code. I just want a framework / lib, not an entire SDK.

2. I'm still a beginner in game dev, so simple-to-follow and complete documentation and an easy-to-start-with library.

3. Easy 3D Support

 

Now with these said, what do the masters suggest me to use?

Edited by DarrenVortex

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runonthespot    169

+1 Unity3d.  Also a programmer background (12+ years), language independent.  Scene view is almost optional, but mostly it just spares you the grind of managing basic views.

I love it most because of the documentation.  Every part of the API has a page and a good C# example of how to use it.  That factor alone makes it programmer easy-mode.

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Tillman    149

+1 Unity3d.  Also a programmer background (12+ years), language independent.  Scene view is almost optional, but mostly it just spares you the grind of managing basic views.
I love it most because of the documentation.  Every part of the API has a page and a good C# example of how to use it.  That factor alone makes it programmer easy-mode.


+1 As visual as I am, I am all code based. Unity also allows me to be free and concentrate on design.

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frob    44909

Another Unity vote.

 

You start out saying you are a programmer.  That is fine.

 

Then you describe doing the job of a designer.  That is also fine.

 

Games need both.

 

 

The visual runtime aspect of Unity is there to help designers.  It is not the only view of the game, and it is a view that programmers will use only to test their code.  Programmers using Unity will see all the code they want.

 

Your game will probably also need more models, animations, vfx, audio, and other elements.  You say you have only a single model, but one model and an up/down animation generally does not complete a full 3D game.  Very few 3D games can be implemented with a single 3D model and no animation.  Unity makes it easy to mix all of those components.

 

Either that, or you can write your own engine, decode your own animations, write your own animation control system, implement an audio library and add hookups between animation scripts and code.  And on, and on, and on.  It is much easier to go with an established engine like Unity.

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Tillman    149

Another Unity vote.
 
You start out saying you are a programmer.  That is fine.
 
Then you describe doing the job of a designer.  That is also fine.
 
Games need both.
 
 
The visual runtime aspect of Unity is there to help designers.  It is not the only view of the game, and it is a view that programmers will use only to test their code.  Programmers using Unity will see all the code they want.
 
Your game will probably also need more models, animations, vfx, audio, and other elements.  You say you have only a single model, but one model and an up/down animation generally does not complete a full 3D game.  Very few 3D games can be implemented with a single 3D model and no animation.  Unity makes it easy to mix all of those components.
 
Either that, or you can write your own engine, decode your own animations, write your own animation control system, implement an audio library and add hookups between animation scripts and code.  And on, and on, and on.  It is much easier to go with an established engine like Unity.


+1111111

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