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locutus

Is it possible to make a comercial gameboy advanced game?

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I just downloaded the devlopment kit for the gameboy advanced. I can see that I would be able to easily make the greatest shooting game ever for it (better then radient silvergun, etc.). The problem is, how would I go about releaseing it? And would it even have a chance? Gameboy Advanced games either seem to be all ports of other systems, or brand name things (like a Simpsons game, a Micro Machines game, etc.) The game quality of the popular games is appalling, and their sucsess seems basically due to marketing. What can be done?

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Maybe you should develop a 3D version of it for the PC first, and then make it for the gameboy advanced?

Like you said... the gameboy advanced games seem to be coming from rather popular games.

Maybe you should base your game on an existing Nintendo 64 game or one that will be coming out for Game Cube?

Just a thought. I don''t know much about console development.

"He who fights with monsters should look to it that he himself does not become a monster... when you gaze long into the abyss, the abyss also gazes into you..."~Friedrich Nietzsche

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If I''m not mistaken, I do believe you need to have a license from Nintendo to make games for the GBA. So best to think of it this way: if your not a proffesional, then you wont be making commercial console games.


If you can read this, All your base are belong to us!

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Yeah, Ive read that you need to have a license to sell games, which Nintendo will not give out anymore. Unless you want to go the Atari/Tengen route and challenge that license and bootleg games. hehe

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You have 0% chance of releasing a game without Nintendo''s license. For a start, each and every game developed has to go through their quality control team before it is released.

The dev kit you''ve downloaded will allow you to make full games, but if it''s Nintendo''s sdk, then I believe that''s illegal. Plus, you won''t have the professional development hardware (although the linkers/carts you can buy are almost as good and are excellent for development).


Your best bet is to forget the GBA if you want a commercial game, because Nintendo have stopped giving out licenses to that and the GC due to sheer demand. I would personally go for a PC game and at the same time, develop a pc game that runs in the same res and colours as the GBA, that way if it is good and Nintendo start allowing licenses again, you''ll have a game that just needs porting.




Marc Lambert

marc@darkhex.com

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By the time you''re ready for a license with the tools you have, Nintendo will probably be giving out more licenses. Once you have a pretty kick-ass game running, I''d take it to a publisher. I doubt you could go through Nintendo alone. Now, in all honesty, you alone, without the Nintendo sdk, will probably have a pretty rough time of it. Sound is pretty much undocumented in the underground. GBA is simple when compared to some other platforms, but its not THAT simple. (i''m totally talking out of my ass here, can you tell?) My advice to you is this:
Make your game. Have fun. Who knows, you may get hired by a more established company if they''re impressed with your work, as GBA programming is in demand right now.

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There's no SDK as such but rather a compiler that allows you to compile ASM/C/C++ code to run on ARM/THUMB proccessor (the proccessor the GBA uses). Go to this site for more info on GBA development and a list of useful tools and sites: GBA Dev

You'll need a decent emulator so that you can run your code on your PC. Visual Boy Advance is very good, do a search on Google.

If you want to run your code on an actual GBA you'll need to get a Flash Advance Linker (try Lik Sang).

Edited by - Kaijin on October 27, 2001 7:05:56 AM

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Hi,

The suggestion of writing a gba game for PC for easy converting is very close to what I am offering homebrew developers.

Basically, I sell developers homebrew gba games which run on PC under a special version of a gba emulator. This enables homebrew developers to write games for the gba and sell them without license from Nintendo.

If you have any questions regarding this, please contact me.

Regards,

Paul.

bedroomcoded@yahoo.co.uk

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what is the link for the devlopment kit for the gameboy advanced?? I must know!! I have been looking all over for it

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If you go to nintendo''s site, look around on how to contact them. They link to another web-site that is exclusively for proposals and i think the nintendo website said this is the only way they take proposals. Take a look at it, can''t hurt. Oh and make a demo for gba first to see if you can''t squeak out acceptable performance for your idea out of the available hardware given its limited resources.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
bob, gbadev.org should have links to several free gba devkits.

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@Infinisearch Yeh I found what you where talking about but I dont think nintendo will let me use the devkit...

@Anonymous Poster That sites very cool and helpful. I''m going to read more on the site.

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You can ignore everyone that says you need a Nintendo license to make/sell a commercial GBA game. It may be true, but it is not important.

Here is what you do. Make your game with your dev kit. When it is finished, send a letter to every GBA game publisher you can find. Tell them that you have a finished GBA game and you would like to talk to them about publishing it. Be sure to show in the letter that it is finished and that it is a commercial quality game.

Someone might be interested in seeing a demo (at your expense, of course). If you are lucky, and they like it, and they think it will make them money, they will publish it.

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quote:
Original post by Thrump
By the time you''re ready for a license with the tools you have, Nintendo will probably be giving out more licenses. Once you have a pretty kick-ass game running, I''d take it to a publisher. I doubt you could go through Nintendo alone. Now, in all honesty, you alone, without the Nintendo sdk, will probably have a pretty rough time of it. Sound is pretty much undocumented in the underground. GBA is simple when compared to some other platforms, but its not THAT simple. (i''m totally talking out of my ass here, can you tell?) My advice to you is this:
Make your game. Have fun. Who knows, you may get hired by a more established company if they''re impressed with your work, as GBA programming is in demand right now.


Sound''s not very hard to program if you go into it with the right mindset. Namely, the mindset that it''s great to hit yourself over the head a hundred times because it feels great when you stop. (An exaggeration, but...)

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Get HAM. A mix of library+SDK for the GBA.

It''s cheap, easy to install and setup (you get a script editor, a compiler, everything in one package). You can compile straight into GBA ROMs with the demo version (at the expense of a snag screen), it does all initialization for you and provides nice interfaces for managing most of the GBA''s hardware features, it features a complete sound engine, with MOD support (Krawall), and, on top of all, it''s compatible with the official Nintendo SDK, so you can keep using it once you get a license.

http://www.ngine.de/site/index.php

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Go for it. Just like a previous poster said. Make it! See if you can sell it for royalities to a software company. Be sure to print out your code and a disc and mail it to yourself and never open it (homebrew copyright via the date stamp from the post office).

Beyond that. I bet you could burn a few off and sell it locally without getting Nintendo''s attention.

What ever happened to the 80s when we challenged system companies and came up with new software companies like EA, Epyx and the like...oh yeah...we forgot how to revolt and where they came from!

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quote:
Original post by bedroomcoded
Hi,

The suggestion of writing a gba game for PC for easy converting is very close to what I am offering homebrew developers.

Basically, I sell developers homebrew gba games which run on PC under a special version of a gba emulator. This enables homebrew developers to write games for the gba and sell them without license from Nintendo.

If you have any questions regarding this, please contact me.

Regards,

Paul.

bedroomcoded@yahoo.co.uk




if this is true.... then i''m expecting you to get a letter in the mail

note: two hints: lawyers, Nintendo

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If your game doesn''t contain *anything* that is copyrighted by Nintendo, you''re fine, I think. There always was unlicensed console software/hardware, cheating devices, as example.

I read somewhere that a company cannot legally prevent third parties from releasing software/hardware compatible with their systems. As example, the Bleemcast, a PSX emulator for the Sega Dreamcast, was released and sold in retail chains, and Sega could do nothing about it, because it wasn''t infringing copyright (but Sony tought otherwise...)

Of course, some companies uses methods to make games unbootable without some kind of copyrighted material, to force thrid parties to license. As example, Xbox executables must be encrypted, and the only avaliable encrypter is the Microsoft one. That''s why all these Xbox media players and emulators are deemed illegal: because they were compiled with pirated tools.

I don''t know the details in creating a bootable Gameboy Advance cartrigde. I know about the flash carts, but noone in their senses would sell a game in such expensive devices.

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This is not really on topic but i played with the dev kit for awhile, the first thing you ahve to do is either make your own or tap into an existing IDE. I made one in vb that hade a file tree like visual products. Its a must or you''ll be typing in cmd and notepad all day. Just setup a textbox at first and have it so hwen u hit a key liek f5 (from visual) it calls the compiler for you and then shells your emulator with your file.


(I think i also once asked if there was a way you could tell visual studio to use your other compiler and someone said yea, but thats i all i remember)

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looks like the big N are trying to crack down on emulation

http://slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=04/03/12/0342208

http://www.gizmodo.com/archives/nintendo_blocks_emulation_for_zodiac_tapwave.php

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