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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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markypooch

General Advice Needed

4 posts in this topic

Hello all,

 

Like the stereotypical school kid sitting in the classroom doodiling about game designs when he was only nine, I negelected a lot of the mathematics being taught to me. More focused on Something that would never come to fruition due to the complexity that they would require. I started programming when I was 14 more as a passion then anything else hoping that it would eventually lead me to be able to create my own game's that I had once imagined into a 3D realm.

 

If I had been told while I was spending countless hours drawing on my notepad in the class room that the math I was being taught would one day be greatly applicable to Mathematics and Physics for Games, I may have been more attentive to the teachers word's. However that is simply a case of could've, should've or would've.

 

As I stand now, I am able to make simple DirectX tech demos using C++. They can never become more complex like I would want them to simply because of my impairment in Mathematics. I can get the general idea of how ray to plane intersection works and even be able to copy and paste it into my code and have it work. But nothing more.

 

As I stand now I have the Algebra level of a freshman in High-School and almost no working knowledge of Geometry or other branches of Mathemtaics such as, Trignometry, Calculus, ect.

 

So as to digress from the verbosity, I am simply asking what next? I have a algebra book that is focused on the topics dubbed Algebra I & II. After I finish that book what should I move on to? College Algebra or Geometry? Then Trigonemtry

 

What kind of resources can I take advantage of that are somewhat applicable to what I am trying to apply these abstract formulas to?

 

-Marcus

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This post contains only my opinions.

 

It depends on your goals and aims.

 

If you wish to create a game, there's no need to know how to multiply matrices, how to calculate cross product & so on, just use library and find out what's the meaning of each function. So for example, instead of (bunch of weird numbers) = (bunch of weird numbers) matrix_multiply (bunch of weird numbers) you can think of it like (rotate and scale) = (rotate) * (scale) without a single care what those numbers might mean or where they come from.

 

As for ray/plane intersection you could use physics library. You might prefer own code, however, in the end you'll want efficient code, so you'll end up reinventing library, therefore it's best not to waste any time and use one right away.

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I myself have a mother that teaches math at college, and used to do programming many years ago, and as such I was told how important the math was the whole time.

 

However, with the help of the internet, many things are much easier to find out now than they used to be, and you can get help with problems that are beyond your grasp.

 

...

 

That said, you will certainly need to get through the algebra, and then I would recommend looking into Discrete Mathematics, as this will force you to learn logic as well as give you the ability to prove an idea... or at least help you to understand other peoples proofs to make sure that it will hold true no matter what is thrown at it.

(I enjoy proofs... and matrices... more than I probably should...)

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Matrix multiplication is going to be useful for you (for moving vertices etc) - I recommend taking a look at Khan academy for a bunch of easy to understand examples then writing some little programs to make use of what you're learning.

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