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MRECKS

In regards to a protagonist's weapon

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Hey gamedev whats happening? I'm currently designing a 2-d metrodvania styled action adventure game and i appear to have hit a snag. I want to give the protagonist a weapon that serves more than one function so i guess this post isn't so much about the story per-say. Its more about what sort of tool i want to give the protagonist. So far i've decided on outfitting the hero with a rifle for long ranged combat, but i'm having trouble deciding what sort of closed ranged weapon to design around. 

one idea i ad discussed was perhaps give them hook swords? its not seen too much, and i think it would be refreshing from the age old long sword or katana that's been made so popular recently. what do you think?

any ideas or suggestions?

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Bayonet. You've already got a rifle after all. [url]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Combat_knife_attached_to_gun.jpg[/url]
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What is the setting of your game, in regards to time and theme? Is it a futuristic sci-fi or science fantasy game? A gritty, turn of the century WWI-like theme? Or is it set in the 17th-18th century, when muskets were becoming more popular yet blades were still used at close range?

 

To answer your question, the game is set in a fantasy universe, around its own version of the 17th-18th century.

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Why not equip the hero with a tool that fits him best? Or have you not decided on such a thing at this stage in the planning process. From my perspective, two characters, one who uses a rapier and a rifle verses one who uses a great-axe and a rapier are two very different characters.

Some questions to think about and ask...

  • Which of the two weapons is 'primary'? Or is this something you'll leave open to the player if there's an upgrade system?
  • What are some of the requirements for getting to new areas? Can't get to high places, why not have a grappling hook attachment for the rifle? Need to chop down trees/bramble/bone-walls/whatever to progress? An axe weapon is an obvious choice. The rifle though I think would be capable of a lot of tasks in terms of 'moving' places. What are those specific barriers that block the character's path?
  • Who is the character behind the weapon? Does it mean much to them?
  • Is the weapon plot central? Is this some ancient blade with hundreds of kills to its name, or is it some cheap look-alike the hero brought along for his little journey and fully expects to get newer / better gear? If he gets better equipment, it would make sense for them to use a hammer the whole game but perhaps it's not 'heavy' enough to hit certain switches or break certain walls down.
  • Will they be keeping and using it the whole game? If you implement weapon switching for melee, perhaps tying it to the player as a 'key' to progress might be a bad idea, unless there are only two or three different ones they can equip. (Axe for cutting down X, a hammer for hitting giant switches behind bars, a sickle on a chain for tugging objects / levers from afar?)

Maybe you're just looking for a cool weapon to fit those other things I just mentioned though.

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