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learned c++, now what?

7 posts in this topic

So recently I learned c++ pretty well, I wouldn't say I am proficient in it, but I think that will come with experience. I then tried unsuccessfully to install SDL and eventually just forgot about it because I was busy with school. but now it is summer so I have time to work on the game I want to make ( a simple 2D jumping on endless platforms kinda thing ). where should I start? and if anyone could point me in the direction of some resource that would be great! thanks :)

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thanks for the response and the link I will definitely check it out. Also I am well aware that my code will look like crap, I wrote a text-based rpg combat type of thing and it is very buggy and all over the place, but I learned a lot from it :)

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You may also want to look at Tim Jones' tutorials at www.sdltutorials.com.

The "SDL Game Framework Series" will take you through some of the basics of using SDL, and then to the creation of a simple game of Tic-Tac-Toe. After that, the tutorials focus on creating the minimal elements needed to create a 2D platformer, which seems to be what you're after.

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LazyFoo is great like mentioned before.

 

I would also watch few parts of these tutorials. That's at least how I started with SDL smile.png

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E4RqHtEAAds

 

Note* those tutorials are for SDL1.2. New SDL2.0 has a little bit different functionality, but nothing to drastic. I would still stick with SDL1.2 because it has more tutorials/support online at this moment.

 

good luck smile.png

Edited by iLoveGameProgramming
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I'd actually recommend SFML over SDL. When I was beginning 2D games I tried starting with SDL but eventually started using SFML as it is a lot simpler and modern. The coolest thing is that if you have any questions, the lead developer (Laurent Gomila) is always on the forum and answers them very quickly! SFML is absolutely fantastic and has a very intuitive interface.

 

Also, I'd recommend abstracting your multimedia libraries from your game so that you can always switch out the lib (you can check out my simple one here). You might want to start with SFML and a simple abstraction layer, then add SDL support if you ever want to get more platform availability (SFML is working on getting OpenGL ES for mobiles, so the support will extend to mobile platforms soon).

 

More advanced C++ game programming concepts that aren't obvious at first can be learned from Game Coding Complete (v4). That'll teach you how there is a lot more to C++ than you probably know. Also, the authors are quick to answer your questions on the forums.

 

As to improving your code, study a computer science textbook (CODE is fantastic) as well as a little compiler design (Game Scripting Mastery). It's important to know how to combat "Undefined Reference", "Already Defined", circular dependencies, using new libraries, and header-source file code organization. Most of the difficult compiler/linker errors you get involve understanding how the linker works.

 

At a higher level, finish all of the games you start, and don't make clones! Consider joining One Game a Month; it's worked wonders for my productivity. Watch for competitions or indie dev meetups. Both will give you more insight on where you are at and how you can improve. Remember that prototypes are the only way to truly see the potential of an idea, so code a quick (>1 day) prototype before you dive into game design documents (or not use them at all)

 

Also, as you are new to the forums, try to be nice. There are a lot of users here who are elitist jerks, so just try not to be like them.

Edited by makuto
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I really can't agree with the "I've learned C++" idea.

 

The notion that anyone can learn C++ is highly dubious to me, I have been a professional programmer (including C++) for many years, and I have yet met only one person who I suspect may have actually "learned C++".

 

The problem is that there are so damn many ways of using the thing, so many obscure features, and so many patterns which are used in strange ways by particular libraries or developers, I'm not sure anyone has ever learned C++.

 

Maybe C++ is like the universe, if anyone ever understands it completely, it is instantly replaced by something even more bizarre and inexplicable (See "The restaurant at the end of the universe", Douglas Adams). Another theory is that this has already happened. Perhaps more than once.

 

Mark

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So recently I learned c++ pretty well, I wouldn't say I am proficient in it, but I think that will come with experience. I then tried unsuccessfully to install SDL and eventually just forgot about it because I was busy with school. but now it is summer so I have time to work on the game I want to make ( a simple 2D jumping on endless platforms kinda thing ). where should I start? and if anyone could point me in the direction of some resource that would be great! thanks smile.png

Now you start small. You start learning to use C++ with different Frameworks. Like i seen from a earlier comment, SDL or Alegro. Just for the start don't pass your limits and think you can link a multiplayer ability to the game that easy :-) im talking out of experience.

 

I tried it myself thinking it was easy and had to retry it over 15 Times till it worked properly. So just start small like i said. Make a Winodws, draw a image or even text. Try moving a sprite or make some collissions. Look at how a Game Loop exactly Works.

 

If you need a start help i got a great articel from the gamedev.net

http://www.gamedev.net/page/resources/_/technical/game-programming/game-programming-snake-r3133

 

From own experience, this was the first game i made with SDL and to be honest im proud this articel was here to teach me, and im thankfull for the owner aswell.

 

So check it out :) and i hope i could help you

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