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Wavinator

Really, Google? Really?

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Wavinator    2017

You know, I heard that evils like texting, social media and the nefarious autocorrect were dumbing down civilization and contributing to the inevitable day when robot overlords rule us all, but I didn't believe it until I saw it for myself...

 

[attachment=16654:GoogleDocsThief.png]

 

And to think Google, of all noble organizations, is involved. For shame!

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frob    44919
It is a stupid thing or a brilliant thing, depending on how it hits you. They pull common spellings (or in this case misspellings) from the web to feed their dictionary so they don't need to buy static word lists from everybody in every language. It is either bad (you get misspellings) or good (you get new slang added instantly). Or maybe both are bad.

It's like autocomplete, only as a spell check.

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It is a stupid thing or a brilliant thing, depending on how it hits you. They pull common spellings (or in this case misspellings) from the web to feed their dictionary so they don't need to buy static word lists from everybody in every language. It is either bad (you get misspellings) or good (you get new slang added instantly). Or maybe both are bad.

It's like autocomplete, only as a spell check.

 

I wonder if that creates a negative feedback loop. People already can't spel, and they're supported by a spelcheker that does even worse. So they spel more bad on their webseites which feeds the spelcheker.

 

Oh darn...

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swiftcoder    18432

Possibly, you've made that spelling mistake more than once and have changed its dictionary? tongue.png

This happens to me all the time on iOS. If you accidentally override the spellcheck when it tries to correct you, it seems to automatically learns the word you were typing...

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cr88192    1570

hmm maybe...

"teh internets be teh new authorety 4 spelin!"

soon enough it starts auto-correcting things to "kewl" and "dewd" and "leet"... (or maybe "k3wl", "d3wd", "l33t", ...).

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Wavinator    2017


It is a stupid thing or a brilliant thing, depending on how it hits you.

 

Wow. Just wow. I had no idea that it worked like that. So rather than pulling the culture up to a higher standard, which is what references are supposed to do, they're helping to facilitate entropy. Welp, idiocracy, here we come!

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CaseyHardman    2765

Funny...Chrome is putting a red squiggly line under "theif" when I type it, but when I Google "define:theif" it gives me the definition of it and links to a page on Wikipedia titled "Theif".

Urban dictionary even has a page for "theif", claiming it's often used in past tense (which is untrue, because the true spelling, 'thief', is a noun...)

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Cromulent    398

Funny...Chrome is putting a red squiggly line under "theif" when I type it, but when I Google "define:theif" it gives me the definition of it and links to a page on Wikipedia titled "Theif".

Urban dictionary even has a page for "theif", claiming it's often used in past tense (which is untrue, because the true spelling, 'thief', is a noun...)

 

It's not as bad a mistake as it looks. Theif was the old spelling according to the complete Oxford English dictionary. So yes, it is incorrect in modern usage, but that spelling did exist in the past and was used.

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cowsarenotevil    3005

Funny...Chrome is putting a red squiggly line under "theif" when I type it, but when I Google "define:theif" it gives me the definition of it and links to a page on Wikipedia titled "Theif".

Urban dictionary even has a page for "theif", claiming it's often used in past tense (which is untrue, because the true spelling, 'thief', is a noun...)

 

Actually, I believe that "theif" is generally a synonym for "theft," (the act) not "thief" (the person) when it is used (very rarely) in modern English.

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Cornstalks    7030

Actually, I believe that "theif" is generally a synonym for "theft," (the act) not "thief" (the person) when it is used (very rarely) in modern English.

Oxford Dictionaries shows nothing for "theif" in US English.

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dave j    681

Oxford Dictionaries shows nothing for "theif" in US English.


The full Oxford Dictionary has "theif" as an obsolete alternate spelling of "thief". Although the only quote it has for that spelling is from about 1300.

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Talroth    3247

 

Actually, I believe that "theif" is generally a synonym for "theft," (the act) not "thief" (the person) when it is used (very rarely) in modern English.

Oxford Dictionaries shows nothing for "theif" in US English.

 

 

Do keep in mind that there is a HUGE difference between Oxford Dictionaries, and the Oxford English Dictionary. The OED's goal is a complete history of the English language, while the smaller Oxford dictionaries are meant to only provide a reference for the language in its more current usage. Stuff comes and goes from one, while everything stays in the other.

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Cromulent    398

 

 

Actually, I believe that "theif" is generally a synonym for "theft," (the act) not "thief" (the person) when it is used (very rarely) in modern English.

Oxford Dictionaries shows nothing for "theif" in US English.

 

 

Do keep in mind that there is a HUGE difference between Oxford Dictionaries, and the Oxford English Dictionary. The OED's goal is a complete history of the English language, while the smaller Oxford dictionaries are meant to only provide a reference for the language in its more current usage. Stuff comes and goes from one, while everything stays in the other.

 

Which is why the full Oxford English Dictionary was the best Christmas present I've ever received :). It is truly awesome in its completeness.

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Cornstalks    7030

Do keep in mind that there is a HUGE difference between Oxford Dictionaries, and the Oxford English Dictionary. The OED's goal is a complete history of the English language, while the smaller Oxford dictionaries are meant to only provide a reference for the language in its more current usage. Stuff comes and goes from one, while everything stays in the other.

If you read cowsarenotevil's post, it suggests that it's still used (albeit rarely) in modern English. Its lack of entry in the Oxford Dictionaries suggests it's not a part of modern English (not to say it wasn't part of Old English).

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alnite    3436

 

Oxford Dictionaries shows nothing for "theif" in US English.


The full Oxford Dictionary has "theif" as an obsolete alternate spelling of "thief". Although the only quote it has for that spelling is from about 1300.

 

 

I bet there are higher ratios of illiterate people in the 1300 than it is now.

 

But, I didn't know there's already an Internet in the 1300s.

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