• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
epzic

2D Platformer Game

6 posts in this topic

Hi GameDev! I want to start designing a 2d platformer game, and I was looking into making sprites.
So far from what I've read is that the most fluid sprites are made using flash, however, I have no idea where to start.

 

If someone could link me to a tutorial where the person shows step by step how they make a sprite using a wacom tablet (or any other drawing tablet for that matter) I would be extremely grateful. 

 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It depends what you mean by fluid -- Flash games typically use a vector art style with skeletal animations -- that is, you have a single "sprite" that's made up of many smaller, independent parts (head, body, upper and lower arms, upper and lower legs, hands and feet), and you animate the sprite mostly by posing all those parts in relation to one another -- kind of like a claymation model with a metal armature inside.

 

This kind of animation has a look that's fluid, but also tends to have a peculiar, almost mechanical look about it. Of course, it looks as good as your animation skills allow, but producing natural-looking animations in this way is not straight-forward.

 

Another kind of animation is to draw separate images for each frame of the various motions your characters can make. Its a lot of work, but the end results have a very different character than with skeletal animation. 

 

The first step is to understand the requirements and ramifications of both of these approaches, both artistic and technical, and then to choose which style suits you. Then you can worry about how to begin production of the assets.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm just a person who just finished high school who wants to start having a go to make a simple game. Previously I have only used the wacom tablet for drawing, with no experience with animation whatsoever.

 

Skeletal ones should be fine, but would that technique also apply for other more complex animations, eg. a bathroom curtain being drawn back, a person using a key to open a door etc?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wasn't trying to be a jerk or anything- sorry if it came off like that. It's easier to answer the question for me if I have something to go on. You don't have to use Flash(and keyframes) to get real fluid motion if what ever tool you have will do onion skinning(where you can see what drew on the previous frame). There are plenty of tools out there that have onion skinning but I prefer Gimp(will also output animated gifs). All of my animation is done in Blender because it is 2d or 3d. See here: http://flatank.blogspot.com/

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Onion_skinning

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Keyframe

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi GameDev! I want to start designing a 2d platformer game, and I was looking into making sprites.
So far from what I've read is that the most fluid sprites are made using flash, however, I have no idea where to start.

 

If someone could link me to a tutorial where the person shows step by step how they make a sprite using a wacom tablet (or any other drawing tablet for that matter) I would be extremely grateful. 

 

 

Here are some cool tutorials

 

http://watertrainer.deviantart.com/art/Sprite-Tutorial-268955357

 

http://ghost0311.deviantart.com/art/Sprite-Tutorial-30322970

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had tried graphicsgale, which was pretty decent for pixel art and animation.

 

Yacht Club is using Promotion for their game Shovel Knight, which I've been meaning to check out.

 

http://www.cosmigo.com/promotion/index.php

 

Other than that, even photoshop is usable for pixel art, just make sure you use the pencil/pen tool instead of the brush.

 

That's bout what I've got. I only just started doing pixel art, and http://cerberust.deviantart.com/art/NFL-Man-32-Megaman-NFL-Helmets-296127089 is the best example I have of what I've figured out to this point..

 

Good luck! Feel free to post progress and artwork!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0