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savail

Game message loop - using 50% of CPU when window is minimized or inactive

15 posts in this topic

Hey,

This is how my game loop looks like:

MSG msg;
ZeroMemory(&msg, sizeof(msg));

while(msg.message != WM_QUIT)
{
    if(PeekMessage(&msg, NULL, 0U, 0U, PM_REMOVE))
    {
        TranslateMessage(&msg);
        DispatchMessage(&msg);
    }
    else
    {
        if( !Render() ) //In Render() function there are all game drawings and calculations 
        {
            MessageBox(NULL, "Failed to render", "Error", MB_OK | MB_ICONEXCLAMATION);
            PostQuitMessage(0);
        }

    }
}

I'm not actually sure what happens in PeekMessage(...) function. When the game window is active and has focus, everything seems to work fine. PeekMessage function seems to distribute CPU to my game in accordance with its needs. More CPU when there's collision, less when nothing happens at all. I experienced however huge growth of CPU when I minimize my window. I probably have dual core processor and thats why it's taking 50% CPU in that time.
 When I erase this block of code from my game loop:

if(PeekMessage(&msg, NULL, 0U, 0U, PM_REMOVE))
    {
        TranslateMessage(&msg);
        DispatchMessage(&msg);
    }

it takes 50% of CPU all the time -> that's why I assumed that PeekMessage distributes somehow CPU. Simple infinite loop like this:

while(1)
{}

will also take 50% of CPU.

 

Why is that happening and how can I prevent this growth of CPU without sleep()? I would be very grateful for help!

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Thanks for the answer. The problem is also that my game has multiplayer mode so I can't stall my application  becouse client will timeout and disconnect from the server. Even if you say that programs run as fast as they can I still can't understand why my game doesn't use 50% of CPU all the time then? PeekMessage must be doing sth which prevents it from using max of CPU I guess.

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Maybe your graphics card isn't able to accept more commands and your CPU is waiting for the GPU to finish?

 

Cheers!

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Since the rendering is probably skipping a lot of its actual work when the window is minimized, you're ending up with a very tight loop that's essentially calling PeekMessage() endlessly. You may want to place a short loop in there somewhere that calls SwitchToThread() until a certain amount of time has elapsed before processing the next frame.

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It would be because it's a single threaded program and it max's out one core. if you have a dual core that's 50% usage on your CPU or one core with HT. That's the usual reason.

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Thanks for answers! I think it's true that it was due to my lack of constant framerate. After adding some framerate the program no longer consumes max of 1 core's processor

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You should empty the message queue every frame, not one message per frame.

MSG msg;

	while(PeekMessage(&msg, NULL, 0, 0, PM_REMOVE))
	{
		if(msg.message == WM_QUIT)
			return false;

		TranslateMessage(&msg);
		DispatchMessage(&msg);
	}
if(g_Minimized)
Sleep(1);
 } else{
RenderFrame();

}

You can tell if window is minimized

switch(message)
{
case WM_SYSCOMMAND:
		switch (wParam)
		{          
			case SC_MINIMIZE:
				g_Minimized = true;
				return 0;
				break;
			default:
				return DefWindowProc(hWnd, message, wParam, lParam);
				break;
		}
}
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You'll want to watch for it to be restored as well when g_Minimized is true. (SC_MAXIMIZE or SC_RESTORE)

Edited by Khatharr
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You should empty the message queue every frame, not one message per frame.

 

The original code is actually fine. If there is a message, no frame is rendered. Rendering only occurs when all messages have been processed.

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You should empty the message queue every frame, not one message per frame.

 

The original code is actually fine. If there is a message, no frame is rendered. Rendering only occurs when all messages have been processed.

 

 Yes, I noticed that now. However, I think that code looks tangled.

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Thanks for the answer. The problem is also that my game has multiplayer mode so I can't stall my application  becouse client will timeout and disconnect from the server. Even if you say that programs run as fast as they can I still can't understand why my game doesn't use 50% of CPU all the time then? PeekMessage must be doing sth which prevents it from using max of CPU I guess.

 

The utilization will drop when something you call "blocks". PeekMessage is a non-blocking call. Something else is causing the slow down.

When an OS call blocks, it will task swap to other programs while it waits for your blocking call to finish. If nothing needs to run it goes to idle and your utilization will drop.

 

Since your CPU utilization goes *up* when you minimize this strongly suggest to me that you are making a blocking call in your graphics code.

Once you minimize the context or rendering device is malfunctioning, the graphics routines are returning an error (instead of blocking) so your game loop runs flat out.

Edited by Shannon Barber
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Thanks for the answer. The problem is also that my game has multiplayer mode so I can't stall my application  becouse client will timeout and disconnect from the server. Even if you say that programs run as fast as they can I still can't understand why my game doesn't use 50% of CPU all the time then? PeekMessage must be doing sth which prevents it from using max of CPU I guess.

 

The utilization will drop when something you call "blocks". PeekMessage is a non-blocking call. Something else is causing the slow down.

When an OS call blocks, it will task swap to other programs while it waits for your blocking call to finish. If nothing needs to run it goes to idle and your utilization will drop.

 

Since your CPU utilization goes *up* when you minimize this strongly suggest to me that you are making a blocking call in your graphics code.

Once you minimize the context or rendering device is malfunctioning, the graphics routines are returning an error (instead of blocking) so your game loop runs flat out.

 

 

I'm guessing its a v-synced bufferswap that blocks when its not minimized.

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To directly check if your window is minimized you can also use the API directly, IsIconic. The name stems back from the time when minimized windows were shown as icons :)

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