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G. K. Chesterton

Yet another game idea: a space strategy/politics sim

7 posts in this topic

I applaud your concept. I've always been interested in developing and/or playing a similar game.

 

I would suggest having a look at Starship Corporation. Though it may not have the same scope as your idea (its much more down to ship design with the 'metagame' being the corporation budget), it still has the same approach where this isn't a 4X game about one race to kill them all, and I appreciate this idea.

 

Good luck!

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Sounds cute. I would download and try it.

 

 

The only things that worries me is if you are not taking more you can chew. I mean, it's all cool and everything, but I would prefer a simplier game I could play now than a complex perfect one in a distant future (or never finished). I would concentrate on simplifying, cutting down all that is not absolutely needed (focus on core fun) and releasing a playable thing soon (so I can play it :D). You can always make a better, more complex version later. In short, don't try to make it like Civlilization and Crusader Kings, these were made by big companies, you are a lone programmer, you don't have the same resources.

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I hear ya. My plan is to bite off only a little at a time - the pre-alpha can have very basic mechanics, and placeholders for future features, and certainly no good graphicstongue.png If nothing else it'll keep my brain occupied for a while. Thanks for the support!

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I have experimented with similar design ideas before, and am currently also developing a "grand-strategy" (well, more like a real-time risk with diplomacy sorta thing) game, and my experience is: making abstract(-ish) strategy games fun, while obviously not impossible, is really hard, because you give up on all the "cheap" thrills of action and fancy graphics: you have to focus on gameplay, intellectual immersion, balance.

Another thing to keep in mind, IMO, is that needless complexity is a dangerous trap: try to have every action the player does be a decision, that is, both doing and not doing some action should be related to some outcome (not necessarily linear or even deterministic, though). E.g. if the game requires you to build thing X on every colony for it to function, that's not a decision, it's only needless complexity.

 

On the theme of Space, while maybe slightly overdone, it does have the nice characteristic of being relatively simple to implement for one person (who, I am assuming, is a coder and designer, not a graphic artist): you can use circles or dots on a mostly black background to represent galaxies, stars, planets or whatever: Much easier than e.g. trying to make good looking terrestrial maps. It also makes it well suited for platforms with less powerful graphics (the web?).

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try to have every action the player does be a decision

Well, I think it's a bit of exaggeration, not every single one make a decision. Let's change it to "try to have MOST actions the playe does be a decision" :) But I agree with the premise.

 

 

E.g. if the game requires you to build thing X on every colony for it to function, that's not a decision, it's only needless complexity.

Yes, but... Sometimes it adds to the mood, and mood is important too. If I play a space base building game I want to build oxygen generators and such. Of course, I agree, it would be best if these were a decision. But if the designer can't make it a decision I still say keep it, it's important for the mood.

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Please give me your feedback: Would you play this game? Are there obvious flaws that would make this game bad? Any suggestions?

The setting seems interesting, and I like the idea of a fresh take on politics. I'de especially like it if you could influence one faction's opinion about another faction. This could either be direct, like paying to move an opinion slider. Or it could be indirect, like selling warships at a steep discount to the enemy of your enemy.

 

I'm leary of the idea that it will take a long time to travel between stars. What will the player be doing during this long time? Will it be fun to play the game while this long time is in effect? Because if I discover that I'm playing a game but not having fun, I'm very likely to go do something else.

Edited by AngleWyrm
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Look up Neptunes Pride. It is the most simplistic, but yet a great space empire building game. It would be a solid base for future expansions.

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