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Vata Raven

game engine question

14 posts in this topic

Is there anything wrong with using them?

 

I'm trying to learn programing, my next class will be an intro to C++...but I'm doubting I would be able to make a full 3-d game, and I also know it's normally a job done by more then 1.

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Well, I've read that you can make a game without using an engine, just the engine just takes care of like...half the coding for you or something.

 

Like, I think the indie game Don't Strave and Limbo were all build without an engine

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I was already looking into UDK for my 3-d based game...but the wiki page lists a lot of engines

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Guess, it's about reseach and seeing what engine does fit the sytle i"m looking in for a game project

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There is nothing "wrong" with using a game engine, especially if the goal is to make the best game possible.

 

However, a lot of engine designers basically assume that the developer is familiar with the concepts of writing their own video game (i.e. their own engine) and if you don't have experience doing it without the engine, using some engines might be confusing, or downright unfathomable.

 

Of course this will vary depending on which engine it is and who its target audience is.

 

If the goal is to understand the concepts of video game operation, then using an engine may "muddy the water" somewhat by hiding some details from you and obfuscating others with its own terminology.

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If your about to take an intro to c++ class I would suggest backing off from 3d - forget the "engine" portion just try and make a basic 2d game with some nice graphics and go from there. You will find that somehow you need to get the items to the screen, somehow you need to play sounds, somehow you need to detect collisions - then once you understand what you need find an "engine", or basically a set of classes/functions, that will do those things for you and use it.

 

Then from there you can try to make your own classes/functions that draw sprites to the screen using opengl or directx, your own functions/classes that take care of playing sounds, your own classes/functions that take care of collisions and you will have your own engine.

 

Or you can just always use already made frameworks to do this stuff for you since there are a lot of them out there and most have been performance tested pretty thoroughly, but if your like me you will want to re-invent the wheel just to understand how it works.

 

Bottom line - focus on a very basic, limited scope 2d graphics game before you go 3d - at least that is my suggestion for ya!

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Just wondering if you've checked out Project Anarchy at all? The engine is C++ based and it ships with a lot of documentation. Developers can get up and running quite quickly and there are many samples you can read and modify to help with learning before having to understand everything that's going on in the background.

 

While some of the others aren't wrong here in that you can learn a lot by building something from scratch, that can also be quite daunting. There's a fair amount to consider when putting an engine together and with an existing engine, the ability to read a demo, make some changes and see the effect that has in your game quite quickly, often provides you with with impetus needed to keep you moving forward to completing your own project.

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I can't really give effective experience advice, as I was kind of already into software development when I became interested in games.

 

But if you think that you are interested in programming and software development outside of the realm of games, then by all means jump headfirst into it. I would recommend starting out with C on GNU/Linux, as that system is completely free (http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/free-sw.html) so you can see a tool you want to use, use it, and make changes (be they improvements or not). Most (not all) GNU/Linux distributions are also free as in zero cost. I would recommend those (I strongly recommend Linux Mint. It provides the convenience, compatibility, and mainstream-ness of Ubuntu without all of the bullshit.). C will get you far in the Linux world, and you can always just read about classes, templates, and the other new flashy stuff to say you know C++.

 

If you are not interested in actually interacting with computer instruction and programming, I would recommend finding an engine that roughly fits your game, and going from there. You won't have to reinvent the wheel, but you also won't get to build a sled instead. If you want to make a game, but don't want to spend all of the time making a new game, you can always just mod.

Edited by MrJoshL
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No, to answer the question...I'm not really intrested in making programs. JUst more into wanting to make games for the PS4, PC, mobile

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Let me guess. Nice looking 3D games that are cross-platform like that. There isn't a way for you (since you are not an experienced and wealthy media company) to publish on the PS4, but there are several softwares that abstract the software implementation away for you. Here is a VERY SMALL list of the most popular "game engines."

- Unity 3D - Easy and looks okay, a sensible choice

- UDK - Hard to use, looks amazing, you can't take advantage of it without being a great CG artist, variant of Unreal Engine (Dishonored, Bioshock, Gears of War, etc.)

- CryEngine 3 - Same as UDK, but used in Crysis games not games listed

- Irrlicht - Looks pretty great, completely able to be modified

 

These are all free as in zero cost. Irrlicht is the only one that is free as in freedom, if you care about that.

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Well, as is...Unreal Engine 4 is turnign to use C++, instead of using their Unreal Script...so, going have to learn c++, no matter what

 

well, thanks for the help

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Well, as is...Unreal Engine 4 is turnign to use C++, instead of using their Unreal Script...so, going have to learn c++, no matter what

 

well, thanks for the help

 

You probably can't afford Unreal Engine 4 anyway. UDK is still based on UE3

 

Also, while UE4 did remove unrealscript it has also significantly improved and expanded kismet (the visual "scripting" system) to the point where you can make full mods without writing any code.

Edited by SimonForsman
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