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vinylmint

Where do you acquire sounds (music, fx, etc..) for your projects?

11 posts in this topic

I hire an audio professional for my projects.  Then it's up to him where to get the assets, or to make them.  Sometimes I hire an audio professional for sfx and VO, and a musician for the music.

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That seems to be the common approach by most developers.  I'm interested in a new approach to the acquisition of sounds for projects that makes it a bit easier. 

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Thanks for the tips! Do you think that if there was a way to put out a custom listing for sounds/music/effects etc... it would be useful?

 

For example,

 

Log on to a site and then create a listing for exactly what you are looking for and the price you are willing to pay.  Watch the submissions roll in and then pick the best for your implementation.  

 

Think 99 designs, but for sound and for your development.

 

What are your thoughts on this?

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Thanks for the tips! Do you think that if there was a way to put out a custom listing for sounds/music/effects etc... it would be useful?

 

they can do ebay and priceline and beemp3, so why not? 

 

useful: yes.

 

would it take off? not so sure, limited demand, i'd say. limited demographics, both on the user side, and the supplier side. only folks who needed music or sfx would be "clients". only "sound guys/gals" who found it worth their time would be suppliers.

 

BTW: Sound Ideas has a number of different libraries at all price points. They're pretty much the industry standard for stock "sound footage", used by all the major movie studios. they even have a library of nothing but classic Warner Brothers cartoon effects (bugs bunny, etc). You may want to check them out. their prices traditionally start out at about $100 for something like a 3-5 CD library. and a single CD can have over 100 tracks on it.

 

what might do well would be a turbosquid type site for sfx and music, if one does not already exist.

 

or an audio version of pyromania

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Hey Vinylmint,

 

Sound effects and music would probably fall under the "creative" umbrella in your game development process. These assets are produced by

 

  1. Composers and sound designers, and as Tom mentioned, it's quite common to either hire a contractor to source and produce the audio for you.
  2. Alternatively, on bigger projects, someone on your team (audio lead) creates and manages a group of sound designers to create and implement the audio content for your game.

 

The advantage of using the above methods as opposed to looking for assets to use on the web is that you're able to consult with professionals who actually know something about audio and who can be a part of your iterative process. It's more expensive but you'll benefit from audio that's been tailored EXACTLY for your game. It's not only huge games that have unique music and sound effects.

 

Audio communicates with players in a very basic and primitive sense, and can be extremely important for your game's branding.

---

I've seen lists of sound effects like what you're talking about, where people put up what they need and offer a price. It's an idea that might work, but in my experience, everyone ALWAYS underbids to the point that it's ridiculously insulting - if your company name is on the Ad, you'll raise a lot of red flags and alienate freelancers, and attract only desperate contractors with no clients who won't do a good job.

 

---

 

Hope this helps! I'm a Composer and Sound Designer and I've had to explain this to quite a few developers already, so I know whereof I speak.

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The advantage of using the above methods as opposed to looking for assets to use on the web is that you're able to consult with professionals who actually know something about audio and who can be a part of your iterative process. It's more expensive but you'll benefit from audio that's been tailored EXACTLY for your game. It's not only huge games that have unique music and sound effects.

 

yes, definitely don't trivialize the difference between using stuff you download  and having a real sound guy. i'm able to do my own sound because i have 46 years experience as a musician, 45 years experience as a composer, 25 years experience as a game audio programmer, 25 years experience as a game musician, 25 years experience as a game music composer, 25 years experience as a game Foley artist, and 15 experience as a recording engineer.    and its just a hobby!   i'm really a programmer!    : P

 

a lot goes into making good music and sound for a game, from the creative, technical, and design directions. someone (you or a hired gun) should take the time to do it right.

 

if you can't afford a hired gun, get some cheap sfx libs and a free wav mixer, and learn to mix your own custom sounds. find a musician buddy to do some midi or something. that kind of thing. anyone can learn the tools, although natural composition talent is another issue. this is mostly just an issue when original music is required. one possibility for music is using music that's old enough to be in the public domain. this can work well with games whose time setting in history is older (such as medieval fantasy rpgs). and don't forget family and friends. My girlfriend at the time was the computer voice for SIMSpace.

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http://sounddogs.com/

 

While you can buy sound library CDs\DVDs such as those from Sound-Ideas, Sony, Digital Juice etc. the SoundDogs website lets you pick and choose individual sounds from most of these libraries. This works by means of searching for sounds under a "Supplier" name with that website. 

If you need only a parcel of sounds from a library, you don't need to buy it in its entirety.

 

The sounds cost a bit more since they're being purchased individually, but depending on how many sounds you need, it's a cheaper solution.

Edited by Kryzon
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