• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Haaa

lead and organization

5 posts in this topic

Hello there,

 

Some day in the future, very far-away future, Id like to start a game development team. but im not sure how to lead the team. Here are a few quesitons:

 

- how should i organize it? should i use like model leads, and what should their responsibility be ?

- should i be a strict leader? id like more info on how i should be as a leader

 

thnx, hope to hear an answer or more soon! Thnx!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm going to move you to our Production and Management forum for these questions. smile.png

 

As to your questions, it really depends on the type of team and development you'll be pursuing; what works for a large commercial studio developing AAA titles is very different from what you might want for a small indie team with minimal funding, and is again different from a hobbyist team with no money at all.

 

What sort of budget were you envisioning, and what sort of games were you planning to make?  How many employees do you foresee?

 

 

For smaller independent teams with two to five people you won't need team leads -- each person on the team will be a capable individual who will take on one or more roles and will either work closely with the rest of the team or will work in isolation (think a composer hired to create music, but otherwise not regularly working with the team) on only a single aspect.

 

For larger teams, it becomes necessary to have skilled management who can help to facilitate proper communication between team members, assign tasks, keep track of progress, etc.

 

 

Should you be strict?  It depends.  You should definitely try to be honest and fair, but the amount of dedication and work you can expect from team members will depend on your situation -- it's perfectly reasonable for volunteers to take time off on little-to-no notice for personal reasons or for other work, while you might expect more dedication from fully paid employees.

 

 

Hope that's helpful! smile.png

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi!

 

It was really! But I mean more with:

 

Organization - How should I then get them to maintain pro. comm, be active and so on?

Strict - I mean more like, well, this sounds like a dumb question, but "how many smilies should i use" - get me?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi!

 

It was really! But I mean more with:

 

Organization - How should I then get them to maintain pro. comm, be active and so on?

Strict - I mean more like, well, this sounds like a dumb question, but "how many smilies should i use" - get me?

 

if you want the people who work for you to act professionally you need to actually make them professionals (in other words, you have to pay them a proper salary, get employment contracts, get an office and run the business professionally).

 

If you intend to form an amateur team you just have to accept the fact that people will have to do other things in order to survive and that your ideas are less valuable to them than their own ideas, The only way to successfully lead an amateur team is by doing the majority of the work yourself, noone will make your games for you for free) and the only people you can rely on to actually help you pull the load is your friends.

Edited by SimonForsman
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You still haven't answered the million-dollar questions, so the answer is still "it depends".

What sort of budget were you envisioning, and what sort of games were you planning to make?  How many employees do you foresee?

 

The answers to your revised questions are still different depending on the type and scale of games you want to create, and the development methods you use to make them.

 


Organization - How should I then get them to maintain pro. comm, be active and so on?

I do have one tip based on this!  I'm half guessing here that "pro. comm" means "professional communication"?  Your team members should never be left guessing what you mean; if you expect them to communicate professionally then you should do so yourself.  If you use lots of abbreviations, scatter emoticons through your posts, and generally take a more relaxed attitude, chances are good that they will too!

 

Again though, this depends on the type of project and development team.  In an unpaid amateur team you can't really control this -- people are volunteering their free time, and they can participate or leave as they wish.  If you're paying professional staff, you can expect them to show up to work almost every day (unless they're sick) and put in a solid day of work.  If you're doing something in-between by using contractors or paying capable volunteers non-official wages (a token amount like $100/month for example) you can expect something in between the above extremes in return -- they'll probably be more loyal than regular volunteers, but you also may not be able to expect x hours/day work from them.

 

 

In either case, you should be friendly, polite, and honest, and should behave in the same manner you expect from your team members to set an example.  Emoticons are fine when used in moderation and if appropriate, but are usually significantly less common or even completely absent in professional communications between paid staff.  On volunteer teams, anything goes as long as it works for you.

 

You can probably find some additional tips in the old topic "what programmers want from a designer".  It's a different question with different responses, but I think you'll find a lot of relevant material amongst the replies. smile.png

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


For smaller independent teams with two to five people you won't need team leads -- each person on the team will be a capable individual who will take on one or more roles and will either work closely with the rest of the team or will work in isolation (think a composer hired to create music, but otherwise not regularly working with the team) on only a single aspect.

 

A quick aside here though.

If you manage a small development team, its always good to start with 'just the one' from every field. While not their lead by any stretch, it will help to build a coherent baseline for your work (architecture of modules, how the 'game' will think so to speak).

 

 


- how should i organize it? should i use like model leads, and what should their responsibility be ?

Experience would probably teach you a lot in that regard, either through management school or hands-on experience. I'm assuming that you'd like to build a team for experience purposes, so my best advice here is: try something, see if it works, then adapt. I've been through many different buzz-words of organization, but at the end of the day, its always a matter of 'do-what-works' and that changes based on the project, team, etc.

 


- should i be a strict leader? id like more info on how i should be as a leader

Show respect. Demonstrate that you are genuinely interested in their comments. More importantly, accept that your 'team' will be better at what they do than you. Though you might understand a situation, and have assessed a specific course of action, understand that you might have just seen the tip of the iceberg. Your team is your everything, and only they can get you anywhere (as opposed to what some might think, hitting harder on them won't net you sustainable results).

 

Even more importantly: have fun doing it. I believe one of the core advantage of doing something 'indie' is that you can enjoy it, reflect on it, iterate on it, and this is what largely allows some indies to successfully deploy semi bug-free games that are actually a lot of fun (Minecraft, Prison Architect, etc.)

 

If you can provide more precise problems as you move along (specific situations with context) be sure to poke around, I'd love to help wherever I can.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0