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xCatalyst

Weary Travellers [New Composition]

4 posts in this topic

Hello, I've been working on a few different projects and I just finished a new piece that I'm fairly satisfied with, you can find it here. I'd like some feedback on it; comments/criticism, etc. I've named it 'Weary Travellers', as this song has sort of been an outlet for some of the stresses I've been dealing with lately. I still need to master it, however, it doesn't sound too shabby in its current form. I think it'd make a good title theme or something along those lines.

 

I'm new to the forums, so I'd also like to say hello and introduce myself to everybody as well. The reason I'm coming here is because the forums that I used to post all my tracks to for feedback has become over-ridden with self-advertisers and I'm sick of it. I can't get a word of critique out of them anymore, and because I'm self-taught, this is really the only way I can grow as an artist.

 

Regardless, let me know what you guys think. :)

 

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I like the percussive groove/intro but some of your patches feel like they stick out a bit. Especially when the strings come in - the production doesn't sound like it's being performed in the same space... or at the same time. The solo violin is really too dry. Considering adding some reverb and slight delay to help hide some of the MIDI-tastic elements of that track. 

 

Also, I felt the overall intensity and volume of the track remained pretty stagnant. Some tempo variations could also help. 

 

It has some great potential and foundation, just needs a bit more love on the production side! 

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I absolutely love the rhythms playing in the drums.

My comments play a lot off of what Madsen said. For the percussion, there are different elements that seem much drier than others.
Increasing volume will do wonders when reaching the point at 2:24 which seems to be where the build-up is ultimately leading to, among other places. (00:43 is one place where it felt as though the piece wanted to build in volume).

Taking into consideration that it isn't mastered yet, I'd say that it sounds good! Edited by M4uesviecr
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Awesome, thanks both of you guys. Now THERE is some honest feedback that I've been looking for! I'll definitely take some of that into consideration and post an updated version here hopefully in the next few days. I'm using a couple different libraries here for percussion, so I'll be sure to make it all a bit more consistent. I definitely need to work on creating virtual 'spaces' with multiple reverb sends. 

 

One last thing, does anybody have experience with Vienna Symphonic Library Special Edition Vol. 1? The reason being, I'm actually ending a slight hiatus/break from composing, so I created a couple tracks using all free samples/libraries [including this one] to really test some of my skills and get back into the swing of things. Now that I know I still have it in me, I believe I would really benefit from VSL. I'm really just wondering how the library sounds as a whole, what type of style it is best suited for (epic, soft, etc.), the articulations and variation, etc. before I go and purchase it. That being said, if anybody has any feedback on it, it'd really help me out.

 

Thanks again guys.:)

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I've never used VSL, but I have included it into my list of potential virtual libraries to invest in.

For me, VSL has a high level of intimacy in its sound. I'm personally a huge fan of the strings. Woodwinds are okay, and so are the brasses, though I personally thought about looking elsewhere in regards to wind instruments.

I feel that the use of articulation is very versatile, but this is all based off of what I have heard listening to various libraries.

Hopefully someone more versed in VSL will leave feedback.
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