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k4rm4

Is there a simpler way of doing this?

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I am new to c++ and this is my first c++ program. I am experimenting with little things, but is there any simpler way of writing this code, and by writing this code is there some way I can use length for both char * c and char * x? Thanks for your help in advance.

ScreenShot1_zps51c790cc.jpg

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is there any simpler way of writing this code

Routines are used to write reusable code only once. E.g.

void
writeTextLine(char const* text, int length) {
    ... put the writing herein
}

(Using the routine is shown below in the next comment.)

 

 

is there some way I can use length for both char * c and char * x?

"length" is a variable can be overwritten:

int length;
char * c = "Hallo World!\n";
char * x = "\nI'm a C++ program";
length = 13;
writeTextLine( c, length );
length = 18;
writeTextLine( x, length );

However, with the routine at hand, using "length" in the main part is somewhat oversized, because the following solution would do the same thing:

char * c = "Hallo World!\n";
char * x = "\nI'm a C++ program";
writeTextLine( c, 13 );
writeTextLine( x, 18 );

Next, the size of the length of character arrays can be determined by using a pre-defined routine, namely "strlen". Using it would avoid the need of counting the character arrays' characters at all. This works, of course, only if you don't want to write just a part of a text line.

 

 

However, a problem with your code is the usage of character arrays instead of the string class. Although legal, it is an error-prone way of doing things.

 

 

P.S.: Please stop posting code snippets as screen shots. Post them as text surrounded by the "code" tags (see the button labeled "< >" in the tool bar of the editor panel). It makes reading easier and it makes copy-&-paste of snippets into answers possible.

Edited by haegarr

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Thank you for the help. It does make more sense to use string instead of char now that you guys have explained things, and from now on i will post code snippets instead of screen shots, thanks for the reminder.

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Since you're using C++ you should refrain from using char* for text. string class was made specifically for that.

// at the top
#include <string>
using std::string;

// in main
string c = "Hello world\n";
for(int i = 0; i < c.length(); i++) {
    cout << c[ i ];
    Sleep(150);
}

And you should refrain from using "for" to iterate through entire containers in order because range-for was made specifically for that. tongue.png

for (auto c : "Hello world!\n") {
    cout << c;
    Sleep(150);
}

(In this very specific scenario, it doesn't actually help to use the string class. Good idea 99% of the time, though.)

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