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Neometron

Floats and Android Devices

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Hello everyone,

Last week I encountered a particular situation dealing with floats in my Android project.  I have two devices, a tablet and a cell phone, that give different results after computations. There is a continuous collision system for a ball and it falls with gravity.  It works perfectly on the tablet device, but on the phone the ball falls through the table. After stepping through the code, the only difference found between devices were the time of impact  ~0.04/s. This caused the ball to be embedded with the surface and falls through.

So in general, what is the difference between accuracy and precision?  Is the terms accuracy and precision one and the same? I know floats don't have that great of precision, but with margin of errors in the hundredth's place?


 

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Very interesting;
Running
 float sum = 0; for(i=0; i<10000; i++) sum += 0.0001; yields 1.0000535 where doubles are 0.9999999999999062.

So currently there could be a potential problem even on my tablet over a span of time. I do check some results against an epsilon value of 0.001, but does this have to be done on every operation? How would one combat error accumulation? Is switching to doubles the answer or is that kicking the can down the road? Do I have to round all results before continuing?

Questions seem to result in more questions ;)

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The point of both of those is that floating point values, either float type or double type, will accumulate errors.  The quick little 10000 item sample is a very easy way to demonstrate it.  It shows that as you accumulate error it grows over time.

 

Switching to doubles gives you more digits of precision but the error will still accumulate and propagate.

 

 

You need to be aware of the issue and code accordingly. Always remember that floating point numbers (both float and double) are approximations.  

 

 

 

As a consequence of that, you should not compare against an exact number but against a range. You cannot easily test for a precise collision, but instead test for an intersection along a line between before/after positions. 

 

For physics and other animations it is often wise (although not always possible) to compute key points directly rather than through accumulation. Like the midpoint algorithm shown above, with physics algorithms it is possible to know the actual position based on the parameters rather than accumulating values over time.  You can recompute the actual values and use those directly rather than accumulating a small bit of error every update.  There will still be a tiny bit of error but it will not accumulate.

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Thanks Hodgman for the article. I have seen fixed time step method used in the Minecraft server code when I created mods for my home server. However, I have not used this method in my current project. Although, while debugging, I have set my time delta to 1.0 to check consistency between devices.

It turns out this was causing different values:

double mag = Math.sqrt(Math.pow(this.x, 2) + Math.pow(this.y, 2) + Math.pow(this.z, 2));

 

I have changed it to this and everything became consistent and my ball collides on both devices: 

double mag = Math.sqrt((this.x*this.x) + (this.y*this.y) + (this.z*this.z));

 

Why is this?

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Short answer: "because float"

Long answer: http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E19957-01/806-3568/ncg_goldberg.html

Medium answer:

Floating point math is deterministic, in that the same operations on the same data will always produce the same results...

...but slightly different operations that should be mathematically equivalent, may produce slightly different rounding errors.

 

It's possible that one of your implementations of Java has a different implementation of the pow function than the other. Because you're using Java, you're at the mercy of the device's JVM in which floating point instructions it uses. Without being able to control the FP instructions yourself, it's likely that you won't be able to achieve 100% determinism across different platforms.

Edited by Hodgman
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