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Perlin Noise for rivers...

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I'm using a form of perlin noise to build out my maps and terrain placements.  Its working fairly nice, but as far as the water is concerned, it is only building lakes and small ponds.  

 

Anyone have any ideas on how to get some semi jagged lines into a perlin noise equation?

 

My perlin noise is a custom random function that produces a number off of X, Y and PlayerId, returning a float between 0 and 1.

 

For Height, I get perlin + (perlin << 1) + (perlin << 2) (etc up to 4) (where the X and Y coords get bit shifted)  This gives me nice smooth rolling hills with lots of variance.

 

For Tile Type, I'm using height < 1 = water, then does a bitshift << 3 (8x8 area) to get the default terrain type, then the closer it is to the center, the more likely it will be that type vs some random other type.  This gives me nice randomized areas.  The game only shows about 20 tiles across at any time, so the 8x8 tiled masses aren't noticed too much.

 

But I want to make this more river based, Valleys, Streams.  It seems like I need another fractal equation to define rivers.

 

I'm very open to change on this equation.

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One possibility: use an octave or two of ridged noise super-imposed upon the terrain.

 

I've been trying to look up ridged noise, and not finding much luck in determining an equation for it.  do you have an example of how to get a value (such as a height variable) for a specific X/Y (location) value?

 

Thanks.

Edited by Dan Violet Sagmiller

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Ridged noise is built almost exactly the same as standard fBm noise, the only difference being that you take (1.0 - abs(val)) for each octave value before summing the octaves together. This creates "ridges" where the value of an octave crosses the 0 line.

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I have never used fBm before.  Can that be obtained for a specific pixel, without having to figure out any other pixels?  for instance, I have a server function that wants to know the height for a given spot.  To do that, it simply runs the height method I used for that particular tile with its X/Y coord.  

 

Before I spend time figuring out Fractional Brownian Motion (presuming thats what the fBm is) can I use this method your talking about with knowledge of only my current Pixel's X & Y?  or does it need a map/full image to work off of?

 

Thanks.

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I haven't read through the details, but I like the results of this method: http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2461996

 

Thanks, that is a very impressive river display.  Unfortunately, it is based against an existing map, as opposed to an equation that figures out a height map, pixel by pixel that provides rivers.  

 

Thanks though.

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I have never used fBm before.  Can that be obtained for a specific pixel, without having to figure out any other pixels?  for instance, I have a server function that wants to know the height for a given spot.  To do that, it simply runs the height method I used for that particular tile with its X/Y coord.  
 
Before I spend time figuring out Fractional Brownian Motion (presuming thats what the fBm is) can I use this method your talking about with knowledge of only my current Pixel's X & Y?  or does it need a map/full image to work off of?
 
Thanks.


fBm is just a fancy name for the "standard" Perlin fractal noise that you see everywhere. In my earlier post, the first image of the base terrain is fBm. It's a sum of noise layers, with the frequency of each successive layer doubling while the amplitude halves. Ridged multifractal noise is the same, except at each layer you take the absolute value and invert it before adding it in. Each variant can be evaluated point-by-point.

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I haven't read through the details, but I like the results of this method: http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2461996

 
Thanks, that is a very impressive river display.  Unfortunately, it is based against an existing map, as opposed to an equation that figures out a height map, pixel by pixel that provides rivers.  
 
Thanks though.


I don't think that's true. I think their technique can be used to generate the rivers and then merge that with a noise-type terrain.

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