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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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SymLinked

Easy-to-use Version Control on Windows? Needs to be able to easily ignore certain files.

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Hi,

I've used SVN before and their client-side ignorelist (their server-side one is useless as it is per folder) but I need it to be version controlled so others who Checkout get it too.

 

I've looked at Perforce but it's not exactly affordable for me, and it uses a different system than what I'm used to (I want Checkout/Update/Commit).

I've looked at Bazaar but it is a nightmare to setup as a server on Windows.

 

Does anyone have any suggestions? Is Mercurial any better?

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don't know what client your using but svn CAN ignore more than just a folder [ and have those settings not just be client side only! ]

TortoiseSVN can ignore folders, files [recursively even] and i would bet also by using a regular expression too.

 

Nowadays i actually use Mercurial with sourcetree but TortoiseSVN is still nice and good and easy.

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Thanks for the suggestions!

I've heard Git is cumbersome to setup as server, which is one of my requirements. Might try it though.

 

don't know what client your using but svn CAN ignore more than just a folder [ and have those settings not just be client side only! ]

TortoiseSVN can ignore folders, files [recursively even] and i would bet also by using a regular expression too.

I guess you're thinking of svn:ignore, which doesn't work like that. You have to add it to every directory you commit. You can't place it on the topmost directory. This is well documented.

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Perforce has a limit in their free edition of 20 workspaces, though. Won't you need one for each depot/repository like in SVN?

 

You can't just update/submit. You have to lock files before you change them.

 

Okay, I'll try Perforce. Thanks for the tips!

Edited by SymLinked
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Whatever. My files are set to read-only if I don't lock or mark them for edit beforehand. Hardly just a Commit/Update workflow..

Turns out this can be disabled per workspace. Fine. I still have to add the files before I can submit. I guess that's okay. Submited successfully. I now tested to delete the files locally and pressed Checkout. In SVN this (or Update) would restore the files. Perforce doesn't do that though, it throws up a CHMOD error. Very descriptive.

Edited by SymLinked
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Thanks, that's useful.
 

I also noticed SVN has reached 1.8 and they've added a global ignore property that is recursive!

Though it is only recursive for directory that have already been added. So if you set the global ignores property on the root and add a new directory which contains files that are on the ignore list, they will still get added because their parent directory hasn't been updated with the ignores property.

Edited by SymLinked
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Git or Mercurial. Both are extremely identical, both have awesome UI's, both have great command line. 

Canonicals Bazaar gets my next vote

 

As a person who works on Web and Software on Linux, Mac, and Windows, GIT has been my go-to everywhere.

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I use git too at home and at work. I really love its ability to create branches and merge code fast. I am a bit worried about its behaviour regarding binary files, but so far we use it to store code for our game and assets and git works fine. If you need preconfigured git server for you, you can use github or bitbucket. The last one allows you to have a couple of private projects shared between no more than five people, and it is faster than github.
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I use git with SourceTree for my personal projects. It makes source control really painless. Using git with command line is not that bad either though there is a slightly higher learning curve for it.

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