Jump to content
  • Advertisement
Sign in to follow this  
Nicholas Kong

What does finishing your game means to you?

This topic is 1918 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

I feel like finishing a game from a programming standpoint can have a different meaning to me as well as anybody else.

 

I know it is very important to finish your game before starting a new game.

 

In my example: I have been working on a simple arcade shooter game. I'm pretty sure I finished the game.

 

To me, finishing a game means adding everything I wanted the game to have from the beginning I started the project and had these ideas in my mind: AI, collision, main menu, game over and victory screen.

 

I like to hear your definition of what finishing your game means to you. I can definitely learn more from you guys!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement

As a indie game dev... um, wanna be..., to me finishing a game means that the game is available for download (hopefully for a price) by the target audience. Anything else is falling short. So far I've fallen short.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To me it's more than implementing everything I had imagined at the beginning I guess. As you progress you'll notice that you like some things more or less than you thought they would. You'll come up with new ideas that you'd like to try out or old ideas you'd like to improve upon. As a hobbyist game programmer I don't feel like any of my games are finished, but I'm guessing having a game released that people play because they think it's fun would come close to that feeling. Blizzard representatives frequently state that some of their games are never finished. I think I feel the same way: a never ending cycle of improvements to be made.

 

It's weird, I can tell you what's not finished, but I'm having a hard time thinking of what finished actually means to me. Maybe time will tell.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As a indie game dev... um, wanna be..., to me finishing a game means that the game is available for download (hopefully for a price) by the target audience. Anything else is falling short. So far I've fallen short.

Interesting statement! Nice to hear from an indie game developer. Good luck on your project! It is important to be self-motivated!

Edited by warnexus

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To me it's more than implementing everything I had imagined at the beginning I guess. As you progress you'll notice that you like some things more or less than you thought they would. You'll come up with new ideas that you'd like to try out or old ideas you'd like to improve upon. As a hobbyist game programmer I don't feel like any of my games are finished, but I'm guessing having a game released that people play because they think it's fun would come close to that feeling. Blizzard representatives frequently state that some of their games are never finished. I think I feel the same way: a never ending cycle of improvements to be made.

 

It's weird, I can tell you what's not finished, but I'm having a hard time thinking of what finished actually means to me. Maybe time will tell.

Interesting. Nice to hear a statement like that from Blizzard. Respect.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To me it's more than implementing everything I had imagined at the beginning I guess. As you progress you'll notice that you like some things more or less than you thought they would. You'll come up with new ideas that you'd like to try out or old ideas you'd like to improve upon. As a hobbyist game programmer I don't feel like any of my games are finished, but I'm guessing having a game released that people play because they think it's fun would come close to that feeling. Blizzard representatives frequently state that some of their games are never finished. I think I feel the same way: a never ending cycle of improvements to be made.

 

It's weird, I can tell you what's not finished, but I'm having a hard time thinking of what finished actually means to me. Maybe time will tell.

Thats pixars line. "They never finish a film they are just forced to release them"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As a professional developer, I don't think I've ever heard anyone talking about "finishing" a product.

You "release" it, but that is not the end of the line by far, you still have to market it, support it with updates, possibly run servers, answer user questions, maybe work on version 2.0, fix bugs on new hardware, etc, etc.

Then after a couple of years you might "stop supporting" it when you get too tired of it.

But you never "finish" software in general...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As a professional developer, I don't think I've ever heard anyone talking about "finishing" a product.

You "release" it, but that is not the end of the line by far, you still have to market it, support it with updates, possibly run servers, answer user questions, maybe work on version 2.0, fix bugs on new hardware, etc, etc.

Then after a couple of years you might "stop supporting" it when you get too tired of it.

But you never "finish" software in general...

NIce to see from a professional in the industry. Nice points, thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For me, I'd say it's a mix of Olof and Mussi's responses.
When I begin a game, I consider the foundation of it - what I feel makes it unique in both atmosphere an gameplay. From there I more or less branch off in every direction and seek to explore every possibility using the atmosphere and gameplay, so that the player can learn on their own just what they are capable of. Typically it's me sketching new ideas and their functions into a day planner or something, but as I test it, and ask for advice from other, one of the key things I look for is proposed changes.
If an element in the game seems more like a matter of luck than anything in such a way that it seems impossible or frustrating, I remove it or look for ways to better it. Sometimes I have an initial idea of how I'd like something to look, and it ends up not fitting into the game as well as I had hoped.
When I feel that the game is polished, and appears stable, and runs efficiently, then I feel it is able to be released. The main game is complete in my eyes.
However, much like Olof said, I may still support it, design add-ons, extra levels, fix missed bugs, and tons of other things.
When I've exhausted my ideas, when I feel like it is time to move on, then the game is truly finished once and for all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I don't see things so mystically as some people seem to. To me the goal is to create a game to how I imagine it, and when I'm satisfied enough with the features to where I would be content letting someone else play it, then I have to focus on polishing it. You know, making it look nice, fixing as many bugs as I can. That's roughly the stage you finish before shoving a game out the door.

Even if you work on a game more after that I see it more as expanding the game than it not being done yet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

We are the game development community.

Whether you are an indie, hobbyist, AAA developer, or just trying to learn, GameDev.net is the place for you to learn, share, and connect with the games industry. Learn more About Us or sign up!

Sign me up!