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VanTrebla

fuzzy .png files in photoshop

10 posts in this topic

Hi there,

 

i have a serious problem... Everytime i save my work for our Android Game as a .png the image gets blurry and has rough edges.

I used the "save for web" option but not acceptable this way... When i directly push "save as" and then .png it gets better but i wonder if there is a better way to do this?

And with tranparency most images are not useable. Is there an other program to optimaze the workflow or a special setting i should use in photoshope to get clear .png images?

 

Thank you happy.png

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HI. Please could you post up an example so we can see what the specific problem is?

 

What SDK are you using to develop your game for android?

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Yeah sure, we use eclipse with libgdx and the R.U.B.E Editor happy.png

Here is a picture comparison:

 

When you open the picture with a viewer both are not that bad, but when we import it into R.U.B.E the first is blurry/not sharp and the second totally rough and cornered... Hope you understand me ;)

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Assuming you have an image that looks good in Photoshop, post both of its PNG saved versions (Save for Web and Save As... -> PNG) as Photoshop saves them, not a comparison made in some other program.

I suspect one of the two images is too large and one too small compared to the size your game engine should really use, causing different scaling artifacts, and/or one is paletted and one 32 bit RGBA, but without inspecting the original images the difference is undetectable.

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Assuming you have an image that looks good in Photoshop, post both of its PNG saved versions (Save for Web and Save As... -> PNG) as Photoshop saves them, not a comparison made in some other program.

I suspect one of the two images is too large and one too small compared to the size your game engine should really use, causing different scaling artifacts, and/or one is paletted and one 32 bit RGBA, but without inspecting the original images the difference is undetectable.

 

I agree with this one here.  Some mobile game engines have a limited texture size, like 1024x1024, and if your image is bigger, it shrinks it, and depending on the method it algorithm that is used could give this problem.  In fact, I remember seeing another post with this problem here with the R.U.B.E. engine, and I know for sure that GameMaker Studio does this too.

 

Hey, now I noticed that you are the OP of the other topic.  What size are these images, and did you try shrinking them, just to see if they no longer get blurred???

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Yeah that's got to be some kind of resolution problem.  If it was just lineart you could use photoshop's tools to fake-smooth it, like by duplicating the layer and blurring one copy a little then merging them back together.  But for colored images I wouldn't recommend that kind of hackery.  Instead, if your image is too big for one texture block, maybe you can split it into two or more?

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Thank you for your reply wink.png

We allready tried different sizes of the images and everything above 2048 is not useable everything with 512 or 1024 is fine and can be displayed.

I think my problem is still the way i have to save my images or some settings in photoshop i have to focus on. At the end of our test the result is not bad but i think it can be better... 

We also split the images but we can't see any difference. 

Edited by VanTrebla
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OK, so 2048 and above gets fuzzy, but 512 and 1024 is fine, so what about multiple images?  You said you split the images and can't see the difference.  Does that engine let you display multiple images next to each other instead of only a single large image?

 

I'm guessing it isn't a problem with the way you are saving files or any such settings, rather that the game engine is shrinking the images to fit them into a single texture.  Normally, doing 4 1024x1024 would fix the problem if you have a 2048x2048 image to display.  Is that not the case here?

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Everything about 2048x can't be displayed (no image on the screen or totally black).

yeah we can split one image into four pieces and set the original image next to it but the quality is the same...

The way i export my .png out of photoshop makes a huge difference, but i think the quality can be much better with the perfect settings blink.png

We're working with the R.U.B.E, its a very new but cool Editor and maybe there are some special settings to get a better image, too.

 

Thank you for all your tips guys, i think we have to do more tests and get deeper into the R.U.B.E Editor rolleyes.gif

 

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So, why are you putting the original image next to the split image?

 

The idea is to split the image, and display that instead, as four different images, that next to each should look like the final image.  It would work like a tile system, except that the tiles would be huge.

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