• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
fir

are you overworked often ?

27 posts in this topic

Are you often overworked, or are you mostly at ease,

and overworked rarely. (I am overworked considerably

often) How do you 'cope' with that?

 

How many hours a week you spend coding, and 

how many hours a week you spend reading about programming?

 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are you often overworked, or are you mostly at ease,

and overworked rarely. (I am overworked considerably

often) How do you 'cope' with that?

 

How many hours a week you spend coding, and 

how many hours a week you spend reading about programming?

 

No answers to that? It would be interesting to hear - I think overworking related things/themes are important in this profession (because programming usually means a lot of work (and I like to hear how do people get by with that )

Edited by fir
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not overworked that often, i have a normal 40 hour work week (not all of it is spent actually coding ofcourse),5 weeks paid vacation,  overtime is rare and is compensated with time off.

I do however also spend some of my free time working on my own projects(Allthough progress there is quite slow as i don't spend as much time as i should) or just playing around with new and interesting things.

Edited by SimonForsman
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not overworked that often, i have a normal 40 hour work week (not all of it is spent actually coding ofcourse),5 weeks paid vacation,  overtime is rare and is compensated with time off.

I do however also spend some of my free time working on my own projects(Allthough progress there is quite slow as i don't spend as much time as i should) or just playing around with new and interesting things.

 

I am not workin in the ofice recent times, workin for my own education only,  but still I am overworked hard quite often; This summer I put on on ease and try to not work hard so it becomes somewhat better, 

 

If someone has some thoughts about the overworking and related things I would like to hear.

 

[ For myself I couldnt decide if putting myself in such overworking states (by working much and not getting at ease) is better of worse, though it seems maybe that is more wrong than good, head need to breath. ]

 

What is your experience, What do you think ? (general question )

Edited by fir
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Its never good to be overworked, your productivity tends to drop when you're tired so in my opinion it should be avoided unless you absolutely have to meet a deadline for some reason.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Its never good to be overworked, your productivity tends to drop when you're tired so in my opinion it should be avoided unless you absolutely have to meet a deadline for some reason.

 

But still I think that many (maybe the most) of the people in this field (hardcore game programming ) Is 'overworked often' Or am I wrong and most of them is relaxed and 'at ease' when working ?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Its never good to be overworked, your productivity tends to drop when you're tired so in my opinion it should be avoided unless you absolutely have to meet a deadline for some reason.

 

But still I think that many (maybe the most) of the people in this field (hardcore game programming ) Is 'overworked often' Or am I wrong and most of them is relaxed and 'at ease' when working ?

 

 

Some crunch time is virtually unavoidable when you're working with big projects and deadlines though. (and during crunchtime almost everyone will be overworked)

How often it happens depends on the company. If it happens often it is a sign of bad management (I don't think bad management is more common in the games industry than in other industries)

Edited by SimonForsman
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

But still I think that many (maybe the most) of the people in this field (hardcore game programming ) Is 'overworked often' Or am I wrong and most of them is relaxed and 'at ease' when working ?

 

 

Some crunch time is virtually unavoidable when you're working with big projects and deadlines though. (and during crunchtime almost everyone will be overworked)

How often it happens depends on the company. If it happens often it is a sign of bad management (I don't think bad management is more common in the games industry than in other industries)

 

 

It is not so much about industry but about profession. Can successfull game making (programming) be done with 'at ease' relax setting ? It is such big amount of hard work that going thru this is a pain mostly (At least it is my own experience, I like it the most, but it is hard pain still)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

#define overworked

 

I think people who enjoy their jobs / work will happily do a lot of hours in it, those who don't like their job will likely get stressed, irritated and / or angry if overworked. Take games for example, it is very easy to dedicate enormous amount of hours playing a fun game, even staying up past your bedtime or making time for the game. This is because you are having fun, if you are having that much fun in work, you will likely not care or even complain about the hours.

 


How many hours a week you spend coding, and

how many hours a week you spend reading about programming?

 

I have far too much fun programming so much so that I gave up playing games for it and by the looks of it this probably wont change, I usually do approx 98 hours a week (researching and programming), but I don't consider it 'work', I do other stuff too like working out, cooking and ofc playing with the cat. I'll admit I no longer have a social or sex life, cant even remember the last time I was in the sun and unless it is technology / political related (mentioned in parliament) I have no idea what's going on in the world. A little too much info I guess, my point is, if you are having fun the time will fly by and you wont really care to question it and happily sacrifice hobbies / tasks so that you dedicate more to that work.

 

I think if a person is feeling overworked, they need to find out what it is that is making them feel like that, it isn't always the hours that makes them feel overworked

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wanted to comment about how stupid it is to read books about programming for hours every week, but then I saw there is nothing about books in the original post.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wanted to comment about how stupid it is to read books about programming for hours every week, but then I saw there is nothing about books in the original post.

 

Why it is so much stupid? It was not about books only but I think every programmer have to read a lot - tutorials, books, forums, articles... I do read a lot and this make me overworked too, as a coding do ... 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

#define overworked

 

I think people who enjoy their jobs / work will happily do a lot of hours in it, those who don't like their job will likely get stressed, irritated and / or angry if overworked. Take games for example, it is very easy to dedicate enormous amount of hours playing a fun game, even staying up past your bedtime or making time for the game. This is because you are having fun, if you are having that much fun in work, you will likely not care or even complain about the hours.

 

 

 


How many hours a week you spend coding, and

how many hours a week you spend reading about programming?

 

I have far too much fun programming so much so that I gave up playing games for it and by the looks of it this probably wont change, I usually do approx 98 hours a week (researching and programming), but I don't consider it 'work', I do other stuff too like working out, cooking and ofc playing with the cat. I'll admit I no longer have a social or sex life, cant even remember the last time I was in the sun and unless it is technology / political related (mentioned in parliament) I have no idea what's going on in the world. A little too much info I guess, my point is, if you are having fun the time will fly by and you wont really care to question it and happily sacrifice hobbies / tasks so that you dedicate more to that work.

 

I think if a person is feeling overworked, they need to find out what it is that is making them feel like that, it isn't always the hours that makes them feel overworked

 

I do like programming but i feel overworked, As I said im working recently for my own purposes and no pressure on me, but I am working consideribly long times a weak (with no pressure), say 10 hours a day 70 weak but i still feel overworked -it is I feel some kind of pain, Im  tired or about that and my head is aching (maybe it is not to acute but it is somewhat constant strain)

There was the times it was worse, this summer I work less than usual 

- So I wonder if programming can be relaxing occupation at all, or this pain is unavoidable. I am not so great health so maybe this is related to that, I do not know, But I am searching for opinion like this.

 

As to game playing this is quite different - gaming is mostly relax for me and it do not pain me like a programming do - thought in very rare cases of maniac playing when you will play 3 days and doing not to much something else it can hurt you too - but I am not sure if this is quite releted (programming is harder there always hard cases tu understand and so on)

 

As to free time, I am swimming in the water quite often and feel 

somewhat relaxed by this but this is weak relax to be true, Society life could relax me more but Indeed I have no to much good society and mostly program - and it is hard pain. I do not have to quit it but it is pain .

Edited by fir
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Reading stuff is not stupid, but reading books for HOURS EVERY WEEK is that a bit, in my opinion.

 

But why ? I do not meant books only but learning stuff of many kind  

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

#define overworked

 

I think people who enjoy their jobs / work will happily do a lot of hours in it, those who don't like their job will likely get stressed, irritated and / or angry if overworked. Take games for example, it is very easy to dedicate enormous amount of hours playing a fun game, even staying up past your bedtime or making time for the game. This is because you are having fun, if you are having that much fun in work, you will likely not care or even complain about the hours.

 

 

 


How many hours a week you spend coding, and

how many hours a week you spend reading about programming?

 

I have far too much fun programming so much so that I gave up playing games for it and by the looks of it this probably wont change, I usually do approx 98 hours a week (researching and programming), but I don't consider it 'work', I do other stuff too like working out, cooking and ofc playing with the cat. I'll admit I no longer have a social or sex life, cant even remember the last time I was in the sun and unless it is technology / political related (mentioned in parliament) I have no idea what's going on in the world. A little too much info I guess, my point is, if you are having fun the time will fly by and you wont really care to question it and happily sacrifice hobbies / tasks so that you dedicate more to that work.

 

I think if a person is feeling overworked, they need to find out what it is that is making them feel like that, it isn't always the hours that makes them feel overworked

 

I do like programming but i feel overworked, As I said im working recently for my own purposes and no pressure on me, but I am working consideribly long times a weak (with no pressure), say 10 hours a day 70 weak but i still feel overworked -it is I feel some kind of pain, Im  tired or about that and my head is aching (maybe it is not to acute but it is somewhat constant strain)

There was the times it was worse, this summer I work less than usual 

- So I wonder if programming can be relaxing occupation at all, or this pain is unavoidable. I am not so great health so maybe this is related to that, I do not know, But I am searching for opinion like this.

 

As to game playing this is quite different - gaming is mostly relax for me and it do not pain me like a programming do - thought in very rare cases of maniac playing when you will play 3 days and doing not to much something else it can hurt you too - but I am not sure if this is quite releted (programming is harder there always hard cases tu understand and so on)

 

As to free time, I am swimming in the water quite often and feel 

somewhat relaxed by this but this is weak relax to be true, Society life could relax me more but Indeed I have no to much good society and mostly program - and it is hard pain. I do not have to quit it but it is pain .

 

Ya I dont think you should be feeling like that. Especially if its every day. Like in my current job or in college I do plenty of work but I always make sure Im sleeping enough and if one week I get a bit less sleep I make up for it at the weekend. And that gets me through each day in the right state of mind to work well.

 

And relaxing occupation might not be the right word but enjoyable certainly can be as others said. If you enjoy what you do youll be more likely to work more.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ya I dont think you should be feeling like that. Especially if its every day. Like in my current job or in college I do plenty of work but I always make sure Im sleeping enough and if one week I get a bit less sleep I make up for it at the weekend. And that gets me through each day in the right state of mind to work well.

 

And relaxing occupation might not be the right word but enjoyable certainly can be as others said. If you enjoy what you do youll be more likely to work more.

 

 

Ya I would like to feel better (I become depressive), but had no

clue how to do it. It is not so bad maybe, but programming it is a constant pain  for me (as I said many times).  'Enjoying it' is not a good word too, I probably do not 'enjoy' it - I do it becouse it is very interesting and I think it is worth spending my time,  but feel like im overworked and do not enjoy almost anything  in a long time :/ Hope it will not go into a worse - it last quite long of not enjoyable slowly painfull times of programming :/

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ya I think you should try fix that. If you dont enjoy it and you doing it is making you sick and depressed then theres something wrong and should be sorted. Thats just my opinion but spending 10 hours a day on something you arent enjoying and is actually detrimental to your health is not good.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Reading stuff is not stupid, but reading books for HOURS EVERY WEEK is that a bit, in my opinion.

 

But why ? I do not meant books only but learning stuff of many kind  

 

Reading books isn't the only way to learn. Often, it's not even the best way. Learning by doing FTW.

 

Right now, I'm hardly overworked. I quit my day job after saving up some money and now I'm taking it easy, working on some projects just for fun. I just submitted my first app to the app store. Eventually I'll have to get some full-time work though.

Edited by patrrr
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I find the term overworked hard to define.

 

I normally work 50 hour weeks (up to 80 depending on my work load). I rarely feel overworked unless the tasks I'm working on don't interest me, or I'm stuck on a task.

 

In other jobs I've worked I felt overworked when working far fewer hours.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well as i said, I notice that when I program much  I go out of relaxed state - recent times I tried go out from this unrelaxed state and for example today at least I managed to be noticably more relaxed and feel ok (but It take a whole two months of lounge - and i worry i could do much work in this time) But this was probably needed - Now i still do not know if go back to work or take a lounge yet some time..

Edited by fir
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Used to be overworked all the time. I find the best way to avoid this are two things:

1. Plan your hours in advance and stop abruptly once time is up. The added bonus is that you get a hard deadline to aim for each day, which stops you from procrastinating. This does not mean you work less, hours. It just means that you plan out those hours, so that you can plan your life.

2. Do not over-commit to doing stuff. ( Over-deliver instead ).

 

Note: Had a huge "crunch" situation a while back. Made an expirement, where I planned the crunch with my team. Each day, we decided in advance how many hours we needed to work tomorrow. This allowed team members to plan out their long days. This is really critical if you have children. It worked great, considering that we were working very long days, the tension really went down.

 

Physically, there are two more things I recommend:

1. Drink a lot of water. I program with a one liter beer glass next to me.

2. Every 3 hours I get up, and physically walk out of the building to a predermined spot 500 meters away. It takes me no more 10 minutes, and I do it no matter the weather. Besides solving your posture problems, it gives you time to think. Do not do this with other people. Do not talk on the phone while you do this.

Edited by SillyCow
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Used to be overworked all the time. I find the best way to avoid this are two things:

1. Plan your hours in advance and stop abruptly once time is up. The added bonus is that you get a hard deadline to aim for each day, which stops you from procrastinating. This does not mean you work less, hours. It just means that you plan out those hours, so that you can plan your life.

2. Do not over-commit to doing stuff. ( Over-deliver instead ).

 

Note: Had a huge "crunch" situation a while back. Made an expirement, where I planned the crunch with my team. Each day, we decided in advance how many hours we needed to work tomorrow. This allowed team members to plan out their long days. This is really critical if you have children. It worked great, considering that we were working very long days, the tension really went down.

 

Physically, there are two more things I recommend:

1. Drink a lot of water. I program with a one liter beer glass next to me.

2. Every 3 hours I get up, and physically walk out of the building to a predermined spot 500 meters away. It takes me no more 10 minutes, and I do it no matter the weather. Besides solving your posture problems, it gives you time to think. Do not do this with other people. Do not talk on the phone while you do this.

 

I have more long time tiredness than the one you described,

 seem that I even do  know now what is a reason to it - when you

 do programing you hold your mind in concentration state (and

 this is something like your mind is closed), when I do it five years day by day I did  much work  but I do not manage acheive a deeper state of relaxation of my head (i was going swimming, riding bike, listening to music etc but it was all shallow relaxation, forgetting more about it all  (two months) seem to start helping me, but still i feel only the moments when it (the tension) breaks,

like yesterday, today it got me again - this is maybe more complicated, i think some life troubles can catch a brain even more than programming, but programming too - I got general problem to set my mind at ease into relaxed state (seem like I just cant do it ),

 Probably I will take yet about month (maybe less) of a lounge, and will do only some soft work - seem I still need it - then I will see.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Our company has just past it's 'crunch' period where I was working on average: 10am to 12am for about three weeks, 5 days a week.

 

Apart from that it's usually the standard 8hr day unless we need to meet internal deadlines.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm overworked a lot and I only work 4 hours a day. I'm a web developer.

 

Things that stress me out:

 

browser/device compatiblity issues (!) Every vendor wants to do things different. f**k them all!!

broken, badly/wrong documented sh*t frameworks/libraries

stupid customers who have stupid requirements and who are too stupid to follow the simplest instructions

PHP

... probably more

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I worked in the AAA industry, it wasn't uncommon for me to work past 40 hours a week. Being I worked on live games, it was mostly afterhours that I worked the most overtime. Things break, I'm called and I'm out the door. Overworked is an understatement. 

 

Now that I'm out the AAA industry (thank god). I'm discovering I have a wife and child. smile.png

Edited by Fastidious
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0