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Non-combat space exploration idea, feedback welcomed

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I like your core idea.

One note though, would ship size affect the game in anyway? for example, is there a max to the amount of crew you can have onboard?

Also, is there a gain to having more than 1 crew of each specialization?

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I like your core idea.

One note though, would ship size affect the game in anyway? for example, is there a max to the amount of crew you can have onboard?

Also, is there a gain to having more than 1 crew of each specialization?

 

Yes, your ship would have limited crew capacity, it would be silly otherwise.

 

I still haven't settled on having different ships yet - thinking about possible gameplay implications.

It's possible that I could have your the sensors mentioned above be slotted, and getting a new, bigger, ship would allow more than one sensor type equipped at the same time. Additionally, the scientific sensor could be something only available to bigger ships only - so that spacial anomalies could only become a source of income (and bigger income at that) at later stages.

Ship size could also have a direct correlation to inventory space, allowing for longer missions and more salvaging. The idea is that everything: rations, spare parts for repairing, salvage, recovered items, etc. would occupy some volume in the ship's inventory.

 

For the crew - the only advantage of having more than one of a certain specialist on board would be redundancy: If a crew member gets injured, he/she is unable to perform their duties on board the ship (i.e. engineers can't repair) and they're not available to be sent on missions - which is where redundant crew comes in. That's about the biggest thing I can think of.

 

My scope is currently on running a small ship, ala Firefly or Farscape. Not a huge one with hundreds of crew as in Star Trek.

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I've thought about possibly including big goals like buying a new ship, but I've yet to figure out what gameplay effect this may have, though it might be good to have big goals like that.

 

they will need to have an impact on the game.   take oblivion for example: you can buy 8 horses, but only use one at a time. you can buy 8 houses, but all it gets you is a bed and containers, and a bunch of pretty graphics. you can't even hide from the guards in your own basement. and there are beds everywhere for free, and you start the game with one container of infinite capacity (joffre's chest).  but then again, oblivion is primarily a large scale mission based shooter, and not primarily a rpg.

 

since the game is about "becoming more powerful", everything you buy must make you more powerful.

 

unless the objective is to just get money, like a high score in pinball. in which case, high score alone is a rater lame reward mechanism for this type of game. players would most likely become bored easily: "look! i just found some salvage worth 10,000 credits! who cares? it doesn't get me anything but a higher score."

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For the crew - the only advantage of having more than one of a certain specialist on board would be redundancy: If a crew member gets injured, he/she is unable to perform their duties on board the ship (i.e. engineers can't repair) and they're not available to be sent on missions - which is where redundant crew comes in. That's about the biggest thing I can think of.

 

I agree that Star Trek overdoes it (1000 people on a single ship), however there was one interesting episode that I really liked where they basically explained that there are three shifts in a day (as there is in most 24h places).

 

Day shift (approx. 8-16)

Evening shift (approx. 16-24)

Night shift (approx. 24-8)

 

I doubt having 'shifts' would apply to your game given the scope, but having redundancy could somehow mean they sometimes get to sleep, which would then affect their morale positively, or rather, the lack of redundancy would affect it negatively.

 

Make sense?

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Hiring anonymous crewmembers and having "your character" among them is utterly incoherent.

If you want a simulation, there should be no player character: all, including the commander, should be anonymous pawns, with the player identifying with the ship as a whole.

If you want a roleplaying game, the protagonist should be the designated Commander (possibly subject to mutiny, marooning, combat, and other mishaps) because the Commander is the one ordering everything discussed in your post.

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they will need to have an impact on the game.

Yes, I agree. Having only get more money as a goal wouldn't be ultimately satisfying if there's nothing you can spend your money on.

I've worked out three ship properties that can be upgraded and which can also be weighed against each other: Cargo Space, Max Crew and Sensor Slots.

 

This can give somewhat of a variety in choosing a starting ship, and then a variety of ships when upgrading.

For example, when choosing a starting ship, you can pick one of three: One that has above-average cargo space, one that has above average crew count, and one that allows an extra sensor slot. I'm thinking that the Directional Radio sensor would be build-in function in all ships, rather than a slot.

So, new ships you can buy would improve on all aspects (cargo, crew, sensor slots), but each would have a focus of some sort, providing a bonus to one of the three categories. I think that would a be a good start to having something to look forward to in a game like this.

 


but having redundancy could somehow mean they sometimes get to sleep, which would then affect their morale positively, or rather, the lack of redundancy would affect it negatively.

Hmm, I haven't really thought about sleep, but I'm not sure I want to increase the complexity by starting to track each crew member's sleep hours. One easier option is to add a "Tired" status for a few hours to a crew member after an action (fixing, healing etc) on board the ship, or after that crew member returns from a mission. If you then have the crew member do something else while she/he has the "Tired" status, they take a penalty to Morale, and the Tired status is refreshed. The penalty would disappear if you let the Tired status expire (as if they've rested). That's something I might be able to work in without too much difficulty, though I'll have to see if it would be a mechanic worth having.

 


Hiring anonymous crewmembers and having "your character" among them is utterly incoherent.

Yeah, I can see how it looks. Originally I was planning a more complicated morale system with things like what you said -  mutiny, being marooned and such. But that didn't fit in with what I wanted, which was just a space exploration/survival game. 

The possibility of just having random crew members (they're all going to have names, so not technically anonymous) occurred to me, but then the question is this: What happens if all your crew's morale drops too low and everyone leaves? Game Over? .. I suppose that could work, actually...

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Hmm, I haven't really thought about sleep, but I'm not sure I want to increase the complexity by starting to track each crew member's sleep hours. One easier option is to add a "Tired" status for a few hours to a crew member after an action (fixing, healing etc) on board the ship, or after that crew member returns from a mission. If you then have the crew member do something else while she/he has the "Tired" status, they take a penalty to Morale, and the Tired status is refreshed. The penalty would disappear if you let the Tired status expire (as if they've rested). That's something I might be able to work in without too much difficulty, though I'll have to see if it would be a mechanic worth having.

 

I was thinking something simpler along the lines of:

recurring morale penalty caused by exhaustion if you have no redundancy, and that penalty would get reduced for each crew member added, maxing at 3 or 4 (shifts of 6 hours being ideal, with crew members always fully focused).

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I was thinking something simpler along the lines of:
recurring morale penalty caused by exhaustion if you have no redundancy, and that penalty would get reduced for each crew member added, maxing at 3 or 4 (shifts of 6 hours being ideal, with crew members always fully focused).

 

Not a bad idea. I'm assuming this would only apply to people who have something to do on board, such as the PIlot, Engineer, Scientist, Doctor, Companion, and maybe the Commander (even though he doesn't have specific on-ship tasks, it can be seen as applicable). Well, I guess that's everyone except a Mercenary, since he doesn't have any real on-ship tasks.

 

I have one issue though - after all that ship size discussion, I'm leaning towards starter ships being of max crew maybe 4 - 5. In such a case, maybe each ship could have an 'optimal' number of each crew member required to operate it. If crew of certain type is lacking, they get that morale penalty that you mentioned. This would sort of tie in with different ships, i.e. potentially some more expensive ones would be more automated, requiring less crew, but performing same tasks as other less expensive ships of the same size. What do you think? Or am I making it too complicated for a player to manage?

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I have one issue though - after all that ship size discussion, I'm leaning towards starter ships being of max crew maybe 4 - 5. In such a case, maybe each ship could have an 'optimal' number of each crew member required to operate it. If crew of certain type is lacking, they get that morale penalty that you mentioned.

I think you could simplify this even further, and just have a morale penalty for all crew members if the ship is significantly below its optimal number of crew members.

While specialties are obviously important, on a real-life ship everybody pitches in when you are short-handed. Even if the engineer takes the brunt of it when you are short on engineers, your crew is a team, and everyone runs short of sleep when there is too much work to go round.

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