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      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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Overmind5000

From one hemisphere of the brain to the other - Advice on utilizing C++

4 posts in this topic

Hello.  You probably figured I'm one of those folks with an incredible idea that HAS to be implemented, but with no prior knowledge of what's ahead of himself.  If so, then you're half-correct.  I have some great ideas, but I've done my homework on the matter.  Originally I've come from the spectrum of asset creation, 3d in particular, and to be honest, I want to dive into C++.  And before anyone says anything, I say I care not for the manual.

 

I know steps beyond "Hello World" and have a good foundation on solving math problems in C++ and using headers.  My main trouble is pretty much typing up the code without template.  In the 3d realms where I commonly dwell, I generally practiced modeling from reference and previous creations, and had trouble with original concepts.  From what I'm seeing, the same behavior is also hitting my coding skills.  I ask you:  How do I tackle this?  I will be open to any advice on the matter, and I await any form of reply.

 

P.S.  I don't mind starting small projects.

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Have you tried creating a small project without using any reference templates at all?  If so, could you be more specific as to what the problem was?  (as in, did you forget what headers to include, or how to structure classes properly, or did you not understand what was going on, etc).  Some code examples also might help people analyze your problem.  And how long have you been coding for?  And in C++?

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You probably just need more practice; you need to internalise all of those little details that you've been referencing from other sources.

 

 

You may benefit from more practice with smaller programs such as the problems presented by Project Euler or Code Kata, as well as working on small games like Pong, Breakout, Tetris, etc.  By working on small programs -- even if you do have to use reference materials -- you'll start to internalise many of the repeated details that form the basics of larger programs.  Try to work without references when possible, but don't hesitate to use them when necessary -- even experienced programmers regularly check documentation when working on non-trivial tasks!

 

 

We may be able to provide more specific suggestions if you can provide some additional details as Phil123 requested above.  Are there any specific problems you're having, or just general difficulties?

 

 

Hope that helps! smile.png

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Based on the OP message I assume you mean that you can get by in programming so long as someone guides you along the way, but you have difficulty coding up something on your own.  Is that correct?

 

My suggestion to you would be to find some tutors that can teach you the necessary skills you need.  If books are not for you then have a look at video tutorials.  There are a number of websites that offer training in a video form so that you don't have to read to learn how to do something.    Have a look here:

https://www.khanacademy.org/cs

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If you have basic C++ skills and just need to know how to structure a real game, the tutorial linked in my sig might be good for you.

 

 

Word of advice though, on both the graphic and programming side of the fence, you can't skip the learning curve.  There is no magic book or tutorial out there that will allow you to skip the learning curve, so dont bother trying.  Do something small until you succeed, then do something slightly bigger.  Repeat and rinse until you've accomplished your dream game.  Or of course decide this profession sucks and take up pottery.  Pottery is a very tranquil hobby by the way...

 

Oh and interestingly enough, the right brain vs left brain theory was debunked earlier this week!

Edited by Serapth
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