Jump to content
  • Advertisement
Sign in to follow this  
Nick Dugger

Should I make a sacrifice?

This topic is 2275 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

I'm still back at the beginning, trying to wrap my head around the actual question.

1> I am a Graphic Designer by trade. I do web design, print design, pixel art, and have dabbled in 3D a few times (and was naturally good at it).
2> I am not a programmer. I do not want to work on other people's projects
3> I am an Idea guy. I can come up with all sorts of great, solid game ideas; and I want to make them (one at a time, of course).
4> I was 100% convinced that I needed to make an HTML5 game ... there are no HTML5 engines that have similar tools to Unity.
5> I have looked into UDK and Unity, and have decided that Unity has the best feature set to get an artist a working prototype. However, I feel like I am making a pretty hefty sacrifice by switching from HTML5. It's been a dream of mine for a while to make an HTML5 game, but without a team to back me, perhaps it's nothing more than a dream? 
 

#1 is good. You are an artist. Most games need art. Seems like a match.
#2 is also somewhat good. You are not a programmer. Unfortunately artwork is not a game.
#3 could be bad. "Idea guys" are everywhere and mostly useless. Game designers are different from "idea guys", so figure out what you mean there.
#4 Why?
#5 Again, why?

I think that refining parts four and five are the key. You wrote that it is your dream, but it is sparse on details.

What is your REAL goal? Is your REAL goal to program a game? Is your REAL goal to become a professional game artist or designer? Is your REAL goal to have a hobby?


The implementation details are a means to an end. If the end goal is to create a game, then use whatever tools are available to meet that goal.

I've played a lot of fun games on a lot of systems. I don't care if they were made in HTML5 or Unity or Visual Basic, all I care is that they are fun and compelling entertainment.

Is your real goal to create an entertaining game for people to play? Or is your real goal to learn HTML5? Or is your real goal to have a hobby? (Some people build boats in a bottle, others train small animals, your hobby may be HTML5 programming.)

Or is your real goal to break in to the game industry professionally? (In that case, enter the field with your art skills and then move to design.)

What are you REALLY trying to do? I don't see it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement

(1) I do not want to work on other people's projects, as I am an Idea guy. I can come up with all sorts of great, solid game ideas; and I want to make them (one at a time, of course).

 

(2) I was 100% convinced that I needed to make an HTML5 game, because I truly see it as the future of gaming, on the desktop anyways.

 

(3) However, I feel like I am making a pretty hefty sacrifice by switching from HTML5. It's been a dream of mine for a while to make an HTML5 game, but without a team to back me, perhaps it's nothing more than a dream?

 

Just to point out a few things:

 

1. It's great that you are creative and have many great ideas, but so does almost everyone else in this industry. Why you don't always see these great ideas in the finished products have to do with several factors both technical, mechanical and esoteric. Not to mention the fact that people are generally their own worst judges.

 

2. No single language is going to be the future of gaming. But do learn as much about it as possible, and then you'll see if that'll be enough or not. Also, have in mind that the actual mass-production of services to the public is quite far removed from what you see in today's technology expos (if those are your basis for predicting the future, as some people seem to think).
Availability != visibility or demand. For instance, there's a whole line of logistics that must be in place before 100% server-based AAA gaming can be viably offered to the audience. Especially when PC DVD's and Consoles are already so amazingly successful.

 

3. If you are concerned about learning more than 1 language, then tbh I'm not sure game design is for you. Have you actually made a successful game yet, using only HTML5, CSS and JQuery? You "sort of know what you're talking about", but what have you actually made? Game designers are arguably some of the most elite programmers out there. Successful AAA game design is often severely multi-disciplinary and requires an understanding of at least the basics of a multitude of different tools, subjects and (possibly) languages.

 

 

My advice to you is this:

 

    Try to find some intrinsic reason for designing games. Game design isn't just a means to an end, it's a massive industry that requires all of your attention and focus, because you're going to need to learn tons and you're never going to stop learning. Perhaps you're better suited for game marketing and distribution, who knows - you'll be able to decide what goes and not, and you don't need to know a single line of code. All you need is the money to invest (which is itself an achievement).

 

    But if you do want to design and develop, then just take it one step at a time. Eventually you'll know enough about your first language(s) to learn the next one more easily, and the next after that. But don't speculate on those things now. If you think you know enough about the future, you don't know enough about the future.

 

    The future is a cascading fireworks of emergent events, not some predefined function of a few simple rules.

Edited by Malabyte

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


I think where you might be hitting a wall is trying to use technologies like CSS. This type of web tech does not offer enough flexibility for pseudo realtime games (I personally also find it completely defective for normal web pages too). So I suggest looking at "coding" languages as opposed to markup (layout) languages.

 

In my own experiments, I've found CSS to be quite a boon, particularly for UI, in my HTML5 game experiments. Usually using styled HTML elements for the UI, which can be overlapped on top of the Canvas with transparency, performs better than rendering the UI elements using draw calls on a canvas. It makes it easy to change the style of your UI, or to make it skinnable per-user. You can also then leverage all the normal javascript libraries, like jquery and friends.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

GameDev.net is your game development community. Create an account for your GameDev Portfolio and participate in the largest developer community in the games industry.

Sign me up!