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Marissa Garno

Looking for an estimate for making a game demo

5 posts in this topic

I'm just curious of what it would cost to create a basic demo of a multiplayer 3d game including a small enviroment and the game's highlights.

 

Thanks :)

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Depends on what you mean by a basic demo.

 

 

There are demos that show the game in early stages of development.  These are generally large worlds that are sparsely filled and riddled with issues. These demos usually look like garbage to the untrained eye.

 

There are demos that are basically the entire completed game but with a small level. These often need to demonstrate one of every object and consequently require everything to be complete and polished.

 

To get a demo of a networked game you also need servers to be implemented and available, not just the game client. Exactly how much of that needs to be implemented depends on your design.

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Thanks- I'm not even going to attemp anything until my design document is finished. I would love to show off a small enviroment with mobs, nps, quests and the other features I've been working on (I'm hesitant to go too much into detail as I've yet to see some of my ideas widely used). I'm not much of a programmer- I just can't figure it out, but have a growing collection of writings, concept art, ect. I have about 20k stashed away, hoping to use it towards the project and was just wondering if that was enough to get started.

 

Thanks for your input.

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There are people who will cheat you out of gladly take your money. They might even (pretend to) make a demo for you. They will generally be more interested in the money than in your game/vision, and given today's budgets, unless you have something extremely basic in mind or want to make a mobile or casual game, 20k won't really get you very far (and even mobile/casual budgets have expanded now). 

 

I suggest that you take a different approach. If you're not much of a programmer, take a look at Unity or Unreal and see if you can whip up something yourself. These are platforms that do not require much programming knowledge to get started. This approach won't cost you anything except your own time (both have free versions) and will likely get you further towards your dream than hiring some random programmers and artists/modelers to do it for you. 

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I have about 20k stashed away, hoping to use it towards the project and was just wondering if that was enough to get started.

 

Not nearly enough.  Let's say you have to hire someone who knows what he's doing to help program your demo.  $20K will be enough for one experienced programmer to work for about 3 months, which might be long enough to make a workable demo.  And you don't have enough money left over to pay artists to pretty up your demo. 

 

Cost questions usually get good answers in the Business forum, floof. Any objection to moving this there?

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Your better off spending that 20k on making a kickass kickstarter ( which doesn't need a full fledge demo as much as good art , design and vision ) and trying to raise 50-200k which is actually more realistic budget for the demo your looking for. It really depends on how ambitious you are. Realize also that alot of people can "claim" to be able to do something but reality is quite different.

 

Good Luck!

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