Jump to content
  • Advertisement
Sign in to follow this  
ZwodahS

A proper way for help screen?

This topic is 1905 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

Hi, I am wondering how people actually make their "help page"

For example, if you have tons of information that you want to convey to the player , do you create an entire sprite to draw it onto the screen or do you position them using the individual sprites that you already created for your game ? If you use individual sprites, is there any "design pattern" that can do it in an elegant way or does the code look extremely hackish because of all the constant values for the position of all the individual sprites.

 

Not sure if you guys get what I mean. =/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement

I haven't messed around with this but just by reading it. I would try and entire sprite and if that doesn't work quite the way you need it then move onto the individual sprites for more control even if the code looks "hackish".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I personally choose individual sprites because that is easier to modify than to change the entire image. I am very curious how everyone else does it.

I once did the entire sprite way for my LudumDare but I didn't really like it. 

I am also curious how the industry actually does this.

Edited by ZwodahS

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It depends if I am making a game that supports multiple languages or not.  If only 1 language is supported then I'll create an entire sprite for each help element and be done with with.  If I support more than one language then I break out the text and make it dynamic and all other things are just one static image.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Generally speaking professional UI systems don't really have position values coded out in the source code it is data for the system to act upon. This can be XML, a full scene graph or even a 3ds max or maya scene that gets loaded up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In addition to these UI scene data as what NightCreature83 said. The nodes representing a UI element may have other attributes associated to it. Like position locking and position ratios relative to the screen. This can be useful especially if your game runs on different screen sizes as they can just automatically adjust based on these attributes than having an absolute position values.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In addition to these UI scene data as what NightCreature83 said. The nodes representing a UI element may have other attributes associated to it. Like position locking and position ratios relative to the screen. This can be useful especially if your game runs on different screen sizes as they can just automatically adjust based on these attributes than having an absolute position values.

You are better off fixing that with anchors than relative positions as only the anchors ever need to know how big the screen size is.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i forgot the word anchor so i used the word position locking instead but thanks for bringing that correct word up.

Edited by BrentChua

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

We are the game development community.

Whether you are an indie, hobbyist, AAA developer, or just trying to learn, GameDev.net is the place for you to learn, share, and connect with the games industry. Learn more About Us or sign up!

Sign me up!