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EternalSun

Should I learn how to draw?

15 posts in this topic

Thanks

 

No. At the higher levels, you nead to model over a sketch. But you can download an image from the internet, and model over that.

 

'images' like in real life pictures or just other peoples' drawings?

 

 

well if it takes just takes couple months to learn how to draw comic-book/cartoon art(assuming that I draw 2-3 hours a day and reach these results), I see no harm in learning how.

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Then again, some don't draw pleasure from drawing :( I wish you luck however, it is a skill that will elude me forver, due to a lack of passion and patience for it.

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'images' like in real life pictures or just other peoples' drawings?

Doesn't matter. It's sort of like tracing over another picture. So it can be a photo, a sketch or anything else. The obvious advantage of drawing by yourself, is that you can get any picture you like. The obvious disatvantage is that it takes way more time then searching on google.

 

 


well if it takes just takes couple months to learn how to draw comic-book/cartoon art(assuming that I draw 2-3 hours a day and reach these results), I see no harm in learning how.

Make sure you take a course, or read a book. What a lot of people who do not draw fail to realise is that drawing is methodical. Just like you learn Loops, Methods, Data-Structures and Algorithms before you can program, you need to study drawing techniques. Just sketching on a piece of paper for a couple of months will not yield good results. It would be the same as opening an editor and writing random code smile.png .

 

I took a short course and practiced at home and it did wonders for me.

 

 

 


Then again, some don't draw pleasure from drawing I wish you luck however, it is a skill that will elude me forver, due to a lack of passion and patience for it.

 

Agreed, no amateur game-dev should draw unless it fascinates him or brings him some enjoyment. You can make excellent games without knowing how to draw. 

Edited by SillyCow
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More than drawing, I think theory on the visual arts is especially important, regardless of the type of project you're making. 

Color theory, lighting, textures, camera angles etc. You'll start thinking about color-schemes, styles, how to use color to convey moods etc. making your game much more polished.

 

These things deal with aesthetics (the "beautiful"), and not necessarily drawing skill. A talented photographer, for example, may not know how to draw but can know how to take an excellent picture.

 

There's a Visual Arts forum around here:

http://www.gamedev.net/topic/641912-2d-tutorials-and-learning-resources/

http://www.gamedev.net/topic/647063-tips-on-learning-pixel-art/#entry5089931

Edited by Kryzon
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It should take you about an hour to learn how to draw basic pixel art. Then after that, you decide yourself how much time you want to spend each piece. The more time you spend nitpicking, the better it'll look. And of course it's gonna look better with experience, as practice makes perfect. But it's one of the easiest things in the world to learn, tbh. I honestly don't like it much, yet even I'm able to draw some kickass 16- and 32-pixel sprites. Go online, on youtube, whatever. And download GIMP or Paint.NET for free (I use the latter, but many prefer GIMP over Paint.NET, as well).

 

And yes, you should definitely learn how to draw some basic pixel art, if only for the making of crude textures that helps convey your game to a potential publisher or whatever. But you don't technically need to learn it. Using the internet effectively, you can get resources for free, and even hire people to do stuff.

 

But sitting down for a day or two and browsing the various articles and youtube, in order to get the fundamentals down? Not exactly a titanic investment, if you ask me.

Edited by Malabyte
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You shouldn't but it is very fun and gives you opportunity to make your own assets. I definitely would like to learn how to draw amazing art.

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I wouldn't do 2 things at once. Learning how to program is time consuming. Learning how to draw on top of that is gonna drain you. Chose one: Programmer or Artist?

Than starting working towards the one you choose. Quality of quantity anyday.

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You don't have to but, if you think you can then go for it.  Learning a new skill is never a bad thing.

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I wouldn't do 2 things at once. Learning how to program is time consuming. Learning how to draw on top of that is gonna drain you. Chose one: Programmer or Artist?

Than starting working towards the one you choose. Quality of quantity anyday.

 

That is true, BUT! We don't need to do only one thing in life. Those who succeed at one skill often do the same with others. I'm not talking about becoming the next Picasso, but while you learn programming which is exhausting and time consuming as you said, why not learn to draw on the side? 

I know I'm not going to stop playing guitar just because I started programming, and even tho you won't be making magic with your pencil atleast you can make your games personal.

But yes, I agree with you. Don't go 100% both at the same time, rather use sample sprites and later draw your own creations!

Edited by aleksnil
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also, Is drawing neccesarry for 3d games?

No. At the higher levels, you nead to model over a sketch. But you can download an image from the internet, and model over that.

 

 

Oh boy, Where to start with this! Right, learning how to draw is a *good* thing to do, especially if you move into graphics or animation programming. It trains your brain to pay attention to the details in your image, to notice the flaws, to care about the colour and texture. Sure you can 'download an image', but that's not where art skills come in handy. We are in the business of programming code to generate moving images on screen. We write shaders to approximate materials, surface texture, shadows, and lighting. We create particle systems that approximate real world effects (rain, smoke, water, cloth, etc). We write code to position cameras which frame our scene. Any visual training (whether it's life drawing, animation, photography, cinematography, sculpture) will help you to do this much more effectively. Period. 

 

As a games programmer, you work in a team. One of the largest contingents in that team is the art dept. Being able to understand artists in their own language, and being able to convey your own ideas in a way they will understand, is a good thing. Understanding how to use the art tools they use, is a good thing. Being 'that' guy to whom the art director speaks first, is a very good thing for your career! Art skills are useful. Enrol on that wood carving course; Take that short course in pottery; Buy an ancient SLR off fleabay; Pop down to a life drawing class one evening; Read that book on Maya. Even if you suck, variety is the spice of life, and you'll learn a few nuggets of useful information along the way..... 

 

FYI: I trained as an artist, before training as an animator, before finally making the transition to tools/graphics/animation programmer. My art skills are somewhat rusty these days (programming sucks up so much of my time, that I mainly do photography now, and a few doodles when bored in a planning meetings!), but I value that experience just as much as I value programming and maths.

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Any artwork is a matter of the heart, so if you do not have the passion to draw then there is no need to ask anyone because your soul is giving you the correct answer.

 

Some fantastic, fun games have been made that required almost no art ability to make and also some developers got rich in selling them. Any game with addictive gameplay is worth a thousand ones with great art but disappointing gameplay quality, speaking in terms of the things that matter the most such as a future in game development and long term income.

 

On the other hand, for those who only develop games as a hobby then they should really do whatever they want to please themselves. Some developers have had so much fun with this strategy that they later discovered their career path in pro game dev.

 

 

 

Clinton

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