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Piter3

Too much Ideas - Not enough skills

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My problem is that I've got really lots of game concept, ideas but the problem is I can't make them

It isn't even matter of the skill - I'm learning everyday something, reading about programming and art and game theory.

When it comes to develop an idea - its OK, I'm writing everything, making scripts and I'm good at this I think

And it's now that I'm writing all the time and learning new things

But when it comes to start making.. there's a problem

I've tried many technologies and learning in them but that's not so big problem to me, I could just make a prototype in the easiest softwre then develop it for serious.

I can't mobilize myself to start, maybe because I don't know were to start after concept is created.

The problem is also with creating artwork - I dont know were to start. I'm learning to draw but also here I can't mobilize. I know theory well but I can't focus on it so much as I'm concerned on my own ideas.

 

That's not that I don't like drawing - I see nice things in my imagination and representaion of my games ideas - It would be fun but the very starting point is blocking me so much.

 

 

 

Maybe my ideas are too complex? Or should I develop some idea on some basic side scroller game at first?

Will the problem be solved "automaticly", by just continuing learning?

 

 

 

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You must evaluate your current skill set, Of course you can't start making a complex and complicated game if you lack both artwork skills (drawing, photoshop, texturing, animation) and programming skills. It's "easy" to come up with a great idea, the hard part is realizing it, because that's when hard work and experience comes into the picture.

I'm currently learning as I go, and I know that to make the next block buster game I'm not even close with my current skills. Don't get ahead of yourself. The reason you stop up is because you don't have experience and skills. It's like repairing a car when you don't know the name of each part.
But learning as you go is not the problem, but biting over more than you can chew is.

Also artwork is not a huge concern in the beginning. Learn to program the game with shady graphics at first, then when you are good enough to actually make games, then develop your artwork. You could do all at the same time but then you need extremely good discipline since you're learning two skill sets at the same time and the learning frustration will be double.  

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So you recommending me creating any game at first, that's approach I'll try first smile.png Thanks

I have to learn both as the time is running fast and "Ticking away the moments that make up a dull day"

Edited by Piter3

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"Ticking away the moments that make up a dull day"

 

Pink Floyd! Love It!   (as i listen to Prodigy "oh my god that's some funky sh*t" )

 

are your game ideas big and complex? 

 

can you give a general example, then we may be able to tell you how one might approach such project.

 

also a basic list of what skills you have (i know language X , graphics library y, and modeling software z).

 

otherwise all you'l'l get is the usual "start with tic tac toe" type response.

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Start by making single screen games like those found in early Atari games.  They are much easier to program than trying to handle side scrollers, 3D, or MMO's.  By restricting the game to one screen means you can handle your graphic resources in a much simpler way.  If you are comfortable with making simple games like tic-tac-toe, try something a little more complex like "Donkey Kong" or Pacman where you need to give your enemy some AI.  
 
Practice making simple games and as you do, you will start to build up a library of common source code that you use for each game that you make.  This will start you thinking on how to make your next game better then the last and what you can improve on in your code.
 
Good luck!

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Even if you're a programmer it is just as important to learn design as it is for a paid designer. The thing is that a programmer in their spare time is both going to have to design their projects, and even working with others they'll probably be expected to either give input on the design or apply the design in a compelling way to their code in order to make the code sensible and extendible for the game.

I've seen quite a few programmers hop on here and say they have like 20 years experience coding for business app companies and they can't even make a pong game. The reason is that game development is a trade just as much as being a carpenter doesn't mean you can be an architect without learning about how houses are built. Programming at its core is certainly part of the job but both the way the code functions for games and the DESIGN is completely different.

In short, I think you would benefit from starting with simpler games so you can begin to teach yourself the process of taking a game from idea to polished product and then your big projects will be much easier to plan.

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I kinda know how you feel, Piter. I myself have only been looking into game development/design for about a month, and I already have well over 100 ideas for games. But of course, the ideas are the easy part. My advise, or at least the advise of others that I have read, start out extremely simple. For both design and development.

  For design,  just start drawing.  Does not matter what it is, just do it every day for at least around 30 minutes. If you have no or little experience start out extremely simple. For me, I started drawing simple cartoon robots (the square boxy kind.) And although I have just started this process, I have seen some progress in the little time that I've done it. I keep and date all the drawings, so I can literally see how far of come in this little time. If you have design software ( at this time I do not) then set aside each day to learn that software.

  The same for development, devote a set amount of time a day learning your language(s) and software.

  When you do get to actually making games, starting simple is the best bet. Start with pong, then breakout, and so on. just about as simple as you can get. The experience you get from making these simple games will build a good foundation for making your way to higher quality games. 

  Pretty much all this is just from what I have heard on this forum and other places, most of this I have little or no actual experience in. But if the fine people of the internet are correct, this seems to be good advice. 

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