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Jason Z

Graphics Programming and Tool (the band)

27 posts in this topic

This topic might legitimately be put into the one of the social forums, but I wanted to be sure to reach as many graphics programmers as possible.  Through lots of discussions with other graphics programmers throughout the years, I have started to notice a relatively strong correlation between being interested in graphics and the rock band Tool.  I personally really like the band (they are actually my favorite...), but they definitely are not for everyone.

 

There seems to be a sufficient correlation to put it to the test - I would like to know if you meet the following criteria:

 

1. You are interested enough in graphics programming that you regularly visit this forum.

2. You have at least one Tool album, digital music purchase, streaming radio station, or other option.

 

This is purely out of interest, and I'm curious to see how many of you have the same interest that I do!  Any other comments about this potential link are also welcome - including confirmation or refutation :)

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I like Forty Six and Two. Been meaning to look up others. Pretty sure this thread belongs nowhere near the technical forums but I'm gonna let it slide with the magic "leave link in forum" biggrin.png

Edited by Promit
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'Tool' is OK but it is not my style. Maybe I'm not pro enough to appreciate that music. :D Only time can tell :)

 

Acutually I have some similar experiences...

 

People who like to program are listening to electronic(chillout or trance) or metal/rock music.

If you are a programmer and you love metal/rock probablly you will be OK(or even like) to listen to electronic music.

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guilty on both counts.

 

If you pluck me, doth i not bleed metal?

 

and over 25 years of graphics programming.

 

 

i was thinking of starting a post to see if anyone else occasionally codes to music, and if so which music.

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People who like to program are listening to electronic(chillout or trance) or metal/rock music.

 

I listen to a lot of Bonobo. I don't know if that counts.

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Never listened to Tool before, got no streaming radio station.. but yeah, I fit the "other option" :)

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I don't mind Tool, but i prefer A Perfect Circle.

Don't listen to metal anywhere near as much as I did when i was a kid. It's mostly Industrial, Dubstep or other electronica these days.

Music helps drown out other peoples conversations while i'm working.

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They're my favourite band too; I have all their CD's and have seen them live a few times. I smuggled in a DSLR and took these pics just a few months ago when they came to Melbourne biggrin.png

 

I do like listening to them while working too. Recently during work days, I've been using a pandora station that was seeded with Tool and Explosions in the Sky.

 

Interesting hypothesis... I've noticed in general a decent correlation between programmers in general and the metal genre (I'd probably call Tool 'prog metal' rather than 'rock', though I do often see them referred to as alt-rock or prog-rock).

Edited by Hodgman
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They're my favourite band too; I have all their CD's and have seen them live a few times. I smuggled in a DSLR and took these pics just a few months ago when they came to Melbourne 

Nice - thanks for sharing :)  I've seen them a few times, but they don't come around to the Detroit area very often anymore :(  Perhaps once their next album comes out we'll see them again...

 

Overall it looks like it is either a love or hate relationship among the responses here.  Even so, I'm happy to know that there is a following out there with the same interests that I have :)

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I’m not so into metal and I don’t think I have heard any of their things, or it was equally forgotten if I have.

 

To answer the question, I am #1 and not #2.

The music to which I listen when I program changes depending on my mood, but They Might Be Giants are the most frequent.

 

 

L. Spiro

Edited by L. Spiro
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Well, since this is now in the lounge, I'll say that I really like Tool (awesome shots, Hodgman), but my interest in graphics programming has waned considerably :)

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I often find in life that people with common interests generally share more than one common interest. When I come across someone who shares one interest, but only one, the relationship generally doesn't last long. Might be some kind of uncanny valley there. That being said, their music, and heavy music or progressive music as general cases, are not always appreciated by the masses. 8 minute epics are either for you, or not for you. I am a huge prog fan, and Tool is likely my favorite band(So hard to choose). I've seen them 3 times, APC once, and puscifer last year. I find Maynard to be a fascinating character, and he is one of the few celebs who's brain I would like to pick. A true renaissance man.

 

For those who have not had the opportunity to experience them, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UUXBCdt5IPg

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Heavy music or progressive music as general cases, are not always appreciated by the masses. 8 minute epics are either for you, or not for you.

I don't agree with that. I like Yes, who has some 20 minute tracks. I love Soft Machine (prog/fusion whatever rock) with many >10 minute tracks. I love King Crimson, that is progressive and sometimes heavy, and has many >8 minute tracks. Voivod and Frank Zappa has some complex songs and definitely not for the masses (except for Frank's parody music stuff). I like early Genesis too. So I can say I love progressive music.

 

My problem with Tool is not the lengthiness, or epicness itself. Maybe my problem with Tool and similar prog bands is that I feel they are trying too hard to be epic for the epicness, to be complex for the complexness, and progressive for the sake of progressiveness. Plus somehow they perfect the crap their studio albums until they become totally sterile for me.

 

But it's just my opinion, I just wanted to say that you can't draw any conclusions about someone's taste of music just from him/her not liking a particular (and quite widely known and popular from a genre) band.

Edited by szecs
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Heavy music or progressive music as general cases, are not always appreciated by the masses. 8 minute epics are either for you, or not for you.

I don't agree with that. I like Yes, who has some 20 minute tracks. I love Soft Machine (prog/fusion whatever rock) with many >10 minute tracks. I love King Crimson, that is progressive and sometimes heavy, and has many >8 minute tracks. Voivod and Frank Zappa has some complex songs and definitely not for the masses (except for Frank's parody music stuff). I like early Genesis too. So I can say I love progressive music.

 

My problem with Tool is not the lengthiness, or epicness itself. Maybe my problem with Tool and similar prog bands is that I feel they are trying too hard to be epic for the epicness, to be complex for the complexness, and progressive for the sake of progressiveness. Plus somehow they perfect the crap their studio albums until they become totally sterile for me.

 

But it's just my opinion, I just wanted to say that you can't draw any conclusions about someone's taste of music just from him/her not liking a particular (and quite widely known and popular from a genre) band.

 

I assume you meant perfect the crap out of their studio albums, which I would disagree with to a degree as well. As I said, I'm a huge fan of prog in general, and yes, genesis, Crimson, Zappa are all welcomed in my library... but... you don't like tool? There is that uncanny valley I was talking about {snicker snicker}

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I don't understand that uncanny valley thing, but I suck at understanding stuff.

Anyway, my relation to music is so intimate that I never cared if I couldn't share it with anyone.

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I am always around the forums, and love graphics.

 

Love the band.  Saw them live in 2006, front row of the pit crowd.  (the pit was kind of scary)

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The uncanny valley is a hypothesis in the field of human aesthetics which holds that when human features look and move almost, but not exactly, like natural human beings, it causes a response of revulsion among human observers. Examples can be found in the fields of robotics,[1]3D computer animation,[2][3] and in medical fields such as burn reconstruction, infectious diseases, neurological conditions, and plastic surgery.[4] The "valley" refers to the dip in a graph of the comfort level of humans as subjects move toward a healthy, natural human likeness described in a function of a subject's aesthetic acceptability.

 

 

You like yes, king crimson, and pink floyd ( I imagine), so we are like brothers,... but you don't care for tool, and so now our closeness in musical taste seems  like a great schism, if you well, in light of that fact.

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I am always around the forums, and love graphics.

 

Love the band.  Saw them live in 2006, front row of the pit crowd.  (the pit was kind of scary)

The last time I saw tool, the pit was seated, as the night before someone was trampled to death at their show in Calgary. I paid 60$ for floor seats and ended up in folding chairs zapstrapped together. I pledged then and there to smuggle in some wire cutters next time just in case.

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