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Tneeds

I need a C++ Mentor.

16 posts in this topic

Alright guys so I'm learning c++, I bought 2 books but I dont learn really well (retain) information that way, I was kind of wanting a mentor to teach me the rest of the c++ basics so I can start getting into programming, I can right a Hello World program and some basic calculators, anyways if anybody wants to help me out reply to me, thanks!

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Start getting into Game Programming, I Want to learn the  basics of c++ first.

Or somebody to teach me the language more, before i get into the game dev side of things.

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Whoa, C++ is a huge topic. I guess Hello, World is a good place to start. First thing's first, you need to get into a position where you can create, compile, link, and run C++ programs. Have you gotten that far yet? Also, do you have any prior programming experience with any other languages?

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There is much you can learn from tutorials and examples, a google search away.

This entire community has the purpose of being your mentor. Advising and training you in the basics of C++ and many detailed topics of programming.... just ask questions and ask for help whenever you need it.

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No, I have sams teach yourself and c++ For dummies, I just know basic variables, and No i have no prior experience, Im a senior in highschool and just want to learn c++ before I go to college in a yr. I know people will say watch a youtube video or something, but idk, i need a full tutorial set thats slow paced.

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Whoa, C++ is a huge topic. I guess Hello, World is a good place to start. First thing's first, you need to get into a position where you can create, compile, link, and run C++ programs. Have you gotten that far yet? Also, do you have any prior programming experience with any other languages?

I use a IDE, I dont do all that, I use Xcode. And no, no prior experience.

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The is NOT a good "by itself" tutorial, but it is helpful when you want to "look up" something you may not have gotten figured out correctly:  http://www.cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/

Not sure if this one is good or not either, but:  http://www.cprogramming.com/tutorial/c++-tutorial.html  Personally I find this 3rd one a bit slow, but if you have no human help it might be good, and also, its good to skim the titles and see if there are any you may have missed:  http://www.learncpp.com/.

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No, I have sams teach yourself and c++ For dummies, I just know basic variables, and No i have no prior experience, Im a senior in highschool and just want to learn c++ before I go to college in a yr. I know people will say watch a youtube video or something, but idk, i need a full tutorial set thats slow paced.

well, so do I, I'm an informatics engineering collage student for last one year, I have absolutly no experience in programming when I was first time start to took the collage, (and still I am, with very basic knowledge :p), we can share any question or information , sorry for my bad english, I hope you are able to understand what I'm trying to tell you about :)

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Learning C++ can be quite hard in the beginning.

I my self had some problem even when following a book.

 

But one thing that helped  me was that if i read something in the book, for example "how to use functions".

Id try and remake what i have done before, but with the new information if possible.

 

Lets take the hello world as an example.

Regular way:

void main()
{
     std::cout << "Hello world" << std::endl;
}

Functions way:

void HelloWorld()
{
     std::cout << "Hello world" << std::endl;
}
 
void main()
{
     HelloWorld();
}

Then when i got that working, i experimented before moving on.

For example, what happens if i write another row after HelloWorld(); with another HelloWorld();

For me, it was by trying out things like this, that was the "Aha" moment for me smile.png

 

Later on in the book you will come across more complicated examples.

But dont worry if you dont get it the first time. Just write down the examples, try to run them.

Try to experiment and try to do your own tweaks and adjustments.

 

What i want to convey is that, for me, the best way of learning something new is to experiment.

Get your hands dirty so to say :)

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I'd like to venture into the C++ world myself, but currently I just don't have the time to squeeze it into my already busy plate. I already have about 3 dozen books on the subject and tons of source and tutorial material. Its definitely in my to-do list. 

 

Learning will take more than a year though. C++ is huge and you really should get a head start by learning a simpler language so that you begin to wire your brain in such a way to make picking up C++ easier. I've already got that head start, being adept at a couple of different languages and technologies (been programming for over a decade now). However, feel free to hit me up (via email) and we can chit chat later in the fall. I will probably have more time to devote to start my own learning process for c++ in the winter or spring. I'm the opposite of you though; I can learn with books and reading, and prefer being able to go at my own pace, as opposed to the often slow pace of a classroom or group learning. 

 

Anyway, just wanted to chime in on this since it's something I'd like to do soon too. I'm not ready yet, but preparing and in a few months I'd be willing to get with you and learn WITH YOU. It really does help to know other languages though, especially if you already know OOP. I agree with Noxil... just jump in and get your hands dirty and keep them dirty. Throw yourself to the lions. It's always worked out best for me that way. Maybe you too.

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Mentoring someone in C++ is a full time job. You should go to school and find a teacher, if you're adamant on getting a mentor :)

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What style of games do you like, and what sort of complexity level? NES, SNES, N64, XBox 360? And do you tend to approach things more from a "get it done" perspective, or "I must understand everything and have absolute control"? Why do you want to learn programming, what are your ultimate goals?

 

The world of C++ is vast, and even though everyone needs to learn the same basics of the language, it's a lot easier and more beneficial to teach with some context.

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I mentor people in C++ through my website.  If you're serious about learning C++ and you want to make games doing it, then come on down!

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