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pinebanana

CS Degree - Is it worth it?

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Some internships require current enrollment in college. A degree just mean you are able to sit still and absorb the knowledge even you like or do not like it. If you did well, it shows endurance, perseverance and a seriousness of committment and possibly shows you know how to budget time.

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As has been referenced earlier, if you want a job you need your resume in the hands of the hiring manager (obvious, right?).  What are the most effective ways to do this?

  1. You have interned for the company.
  2. You know the manager.
  3. You know someone who knows the manager and who vouches for you.
  4. You attend any seminar / conference / job fair that puts you into direct contact with the manager.

As Washu mentioned, HR receives and rejects thousands of resumes before any manager gets a whiff of them.  At larger companies they use "search" terms to create a score.  This leads to resume padding, sometimes to ludicrous levels.  Bypassing HR, if possible, dramatically increases your odds.  Tying the above knowledge to a university.....

 

One overlooked aspect of education at a university is that they tend to have great connections to industry.  Often they will have a resource center where they invite recruiters to interview.  Typically the recruiters are either professionals who visit with hiring managers, or the managers themselves.  Put all those big dollars you're spending into good use and attend these interviews!

 

The job resource center will usually host co-ops and internships as well.  As I've mentioned earlier, if you spend some time with an employer you get some "face" time that no resume can supplant.  If you're at these jobs learn as much as you can.  Make as many friends and connections as possible.  Even if you discover that the actual internship or company isn't exactly what you want to do, there's a good chance one of your connections will know a perfect match for you.  They'll refer you through a friend or have direct contacts with a manager (which allows you to bypass HR).

 

Also, internships tend to pay money.  I remember mine well.  Instead of pouring concrete with the local construction company for a summer, I was in air-conditioned bliss, making 3x that salary and following my educational goals.

 

Anyways, best of luck!

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Worth it a lot. I'm currently doing Information Systems, and I'm planning someday to get a BS in CS. Every teacher recommends. But CS is something that you can learn at home. Just google CS books, read, understand the concepts and implement them.

Edited by irlanrobson
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But CS is something that you can learn at home. Just google CS books, read, understand the concepts and implement them.

To my mind, this is sort of like saying one can learn to be a hibachi chef by reading a book. While it is technically true, in practice most people who try will end up cutting a hand off.

 

There is something to be said for having an experienced mentor guide you through reading that CS book...

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Worth it a lot. I'm currently doing Information Systems, and I'm planning someday to get a BS in CS. Every teacher recommends. But CS is something that you can learn at home. Just google CS books, read, understand the concepts and implement them.

It should be noted that this mostly depends on personal experiences.

 

I myself have only visited 60-70% of the lectures given in my first year. Why? Because I didn't need the courses that were trying to teach me how to program (didn't need means I passed them with very good grades in this case). However, the courses related to algorithms, math, data structures, math and formal languages (to name a few) were very useful for me as I only knew the absolute basics of those subjects. At the moment, I'm visiting close to 90-95% of the lectures as I really benefit from them.

 

A book telling you a problem can be solved with a certain equation and another problem can be solved with another equation is something totally different than a teacher describing how those equations are formed and how they are (not) related to each other. The same can be said for programming paradigms: every person with some decent knowledge about programming can learn a paradigm. Period. However, how certain paradigms are related, can (not) be combined and/or why they are (not) useful is something a lot of internet resources and books neglect to point out. (I know, there are of course exceptions to this)

 

My point is: while books and internet resources will/might (depends on your point of view) tell you what you need to know, teachers also tell you what you should want to know. (again, there are exceptions)

Edited by assainator
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