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      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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Finding Game Jobs

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Typically searching for "game developer" jobs with a job search engine doesn't bring anything up. Assuming you are looking for a non-online job what are some good ways to find a game developer job? Are there better websites or are there better keywords to use?

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1. Check gamedevmap and gameindustrymap for local game companies (within daily commuting distance of where you live).

2. If there are none, move.

3. Having identified local game companies, explore their websites. Not only their jobs pages but also all their products and everything.

4. Apply.

 

5.  Also update your LinkedIn profile and let the games companies come to you ;)

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Have you tried searching on the Monster Website ?

 

Try also the classifieds here on this site.  Searching through the already posted ads or advertising yourself with credentials listed.

 

I have found a few, non-game programming jobs on Craigslist.com.   Many times small businesses, or people like us will enlist the help of the gainfully un-employed in order to save money over large companies offering services.

 

  Be prepared to work for free until your work is proven,  Usually don't get paid until job is done and working effectively

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Be prepared to work for free until your work is proven,  Usually don't get paid until job is done and working effectively
Bad advice.

 

Unpaid jobs are probably unlawful due to minimum wage concerns. In the US there are six requirements that must be met for it to be legal to be an unpaid position.  Unpaid interns are only legal in rare situations where the intern is more of an observer or when the intern produces unusable content generally at a cost to the company. Software development would not qualify on 4/6 of the requirements. Specifically it is not a training environment but instead is a workplace environment, results are used to benefit of the company, the person potentially fills the slot of a regular employees rather than a non-displacing task of observing them, and employer derives direct advantage from the activities. Most states are cracking down on violations of the Fair Labor Standards Act, and if you see a company violating it, report it.

 

If you are working on a contract basis you should be collecting money at every milestone. One of those paid milestones should be the signing of the contract, before any production work is complete. 

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Be prepared to work for free until your work is proven,  Usually don't get paid until job is done and working effectively
Bad advice.

 

Unpaid jobs are probably unlawful due to minimum wage concerns. In the US there are six requirements that must be met for it to be legal to be an unpaid position.  Unpaid interns are only legal in rare situations where the intern is more of an observer or when the intern produces unusable content generally at a cost to the company. Software development would not qualify on 4/6 of the requirements. Specifically it is not a training environment but instead is a workplace environment, results are used to benefit of the company, the person potentially fills the slot of a regular employees rather than a non-displacing task of observing them, and employer derives direct advantage from the activities. Most states are cracking down on violations of the Fair Labor Standards Act, and if you see a company violating it, report it.

 

If you are working on a contract basis you should be collecting money at every milestone. One of those paid milestones should be the signing of the contract, before any production work is complete. 

 

It is obvious you misunderstood my comment, or maybe it was unclear.  Your explanation is what I meant.  I do not know about where you are at, but here, on a contract basis you may work 2+ weeks before your work is done, then once installed and verified that it works as described is when you get paid. Even then it may take an additional 30 days before payment is received.

 

That is what I meant by working and not getting paid.

 

Of course, if you are hired and go to work in an office setting, then you are and employee and fall under labor laws.

 

Sorry that you and maybe others Misunderstood.

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