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valdsign

IDE for C++ Programming

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Good day fellas, I want a little enlightenment here, what IDE you guys suggest for C++ programming ? I'm currently using netbeans 7.3, the compiling process is pretty slow. thanks before :)

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I use Code::Blocks. Hasn't done me any wrong so far.

is it light enough? because netbeans is pretty slow,  I only use 1 gb of memory on my laptop

Edited by valdsign
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Well CB doesn't offer the features that visual studio does, but it's a bit more flexible. You can use any compiler you want, the VC++ compiler if you want, while visual studio is stuck to it's only one.

If your all windows then VC++ should do you fine, but if you like portability and moving around, CB and other IDE's might be better since they're not coupled with Windows. I also don't like how VC++ has to have its own libraries ( "Visual C++ Redistributable Package" )

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Compilation speed is mostly a matter of the compiler, not of the IDE. If you're asking for speed, changing from Netbeans with GCC to code::blocks with GCC will not make much difference.

 

Benchmarks seem to show that Visual C++ is faster than GCC:

http://www.willus.com/ccomp_benchmark2.shtml?p1

http://www.drdobbs.com/cpp/comparing-cc-compilers/184405450

However, C++ 11 support is still very incomplete in the compiler that comes with Visual Studio 2012.

 

Maybe you can improve compile times using precompiled headers.

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wow, thank you guys for such a amazing respons, I don't have any of this in any forum I have joined before.. I'll look forward for suggestions you have posted, thank you

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Well CB doesn't offer the features that visual studio does, but it's a bit more flexible. You can use any compiler you want, the VC++ compiler if you want, while visual studio is stuck to it's only one.

If your all windows then VC++ should do you fine, but if you like portability and moving around, CB and other IDE's might be better since they're not coupled with Windows. I also don't like how VC++ has to have its own libraries ( "Visual C++ Redistributable Package" )

I'll try that one :)

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I find Java* based IDEs like Netbeans far too slow and heavy for some reason. Eclipse is marginally better because it has a larger amount of native code. Visual Studio is faster still because that is pretty much all native (has very little .NET code in there).

 

However, slow compile times are likely due to the compiler rather than IDE. Visual Studio uses cl whereas netbeans uses g++ (Mingw port which is not entirely native to the OS). I find cl to be a little bit faster in compile times on Windows so Visual Studio might be the better choice again.

 

Then again, nvi and Makefiles is all I use these days anyway.

 

* I dont know if it is the fault of Java or if Netbeans is just too overly modular. It seemed to be just as slow when compiled with gcj (native java compiler). It gives me motion sickness just using it for a few mins ;)

Edited by Karsten_
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Of all the IDE's I've used, Visual studio is by far the best

 

Compilation speed is mostly a matter of the compiler, not of the IDE. If you're asking for speed, changing from Netbeans with GCC to code::blocks with GCC will not make much difference.

 

Benchmarks seem to show that Visual C++ is faster than GCC:

http://www.willus.com/ccomp_benchmark2.shtml?p1

http://www.drdobbs.com/cpp/comparing-cc-compilers/184405450

However, C++ 11 support is still very incomplete in the compiler that comes with Visual Studio 2012.

 

Maybe you can improve compile times using precompiled headers.

I have one gigabyte of memory using win 7 x64 and core i3-380M, my laptop is oftenly freeze for a couple second when I type a bunch of code also in compilation. I'm sorry for these stupid question, what does precompiled header ? 

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Visual Studio would be my suggestion as well, but if you're looking for alternatives you might also look into Qt Creator -- note that although it's designed for use with Qt, you can just use it as a general C++ development environment.

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Well CB doesn't offer the features that visual studio does, but it's a bit more flexible. You can use any compiler you want, the VC++ compiler if you want, while visual studio is stuck to it's only one.

If your all windows then VC++ should do you fine, but if you like portability and moving around, CB and other IDE's might be better since they're not coupled with Windows. I also don't like how VC++ has to have its own libraries ( "Visual C++ Redistributable Package" )

I have to try both of them,

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Visual Studio would be my suggestion as well, but if you're looking for alternatives you might also look into Qt Creator -- note that although it's designed for use with Qt, you can just use it as a general C++ development environment.

very well sir, I've never try Qt Creator before

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I find Java* based IDEs like Netbeans far too slow and heavy for some reason. Eclipse is marginally better because it has a larger amount of native code. Visual Studio is faster still because that is pretty much all native (has very little .NET code in there).

 

However, slow compile times are likely due to the compiler rather than IDE. Visual Studio uses cl whereas netbeans uses g++ (Mingw port which is not entirely native to the OS). I find cl to be a little bit faster in compile times on Windows so Visual Studio might be the better choice again.

 

* I dont know if it is the fault of Java or if Netbeans is just too overly modular. It seemed to be just as slow when compiled with gcj (native java compiler). It gives me motion sickness just using it for a few mins ;)

indeed, it's oftenly frustrating me, I have tried Dev-C++ once. but since I have a little knowledge in compiler (because my objectives is basic of programming it self) Dev-C++ drives me crazy

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to be honest.. I doubt that with 1gb of ram running win7 64 you'll be able to see improvements.

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I have one gigabyte of memory using win 7 x64 and core i3-380M, my laptop is oftenly freeze for a couple second when I type a bunch of code also in compilation. I'm sorry for these stupid question, what does precompiled header ?

1 GB seems somewhat underpowered, especially for a 64 bit OS.

 

Precompiled headers:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Precompiled_header

If you include large header files, like windows.h, that file gets compiled again and again without having been changed. So you typically put these headers into one "master" .h file, and make this the source of the "precompiled header", preventing it from being compiled again if the contents didn't change.

Both VC++ and GCC have support for precompiled headers.

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to be honest.. I doubt that with 1gb of ram running win7 64 you'll be able to see improvements.

I see, that's what I'm concern about

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I have one gigabyte of memory using win 7 x64 and core i3-380M, my laptop is oftenly freeze for a couple second when I type a bunch of code also in compilation. I'm sorry for these stupid question, what does precompiled header ?
 

1 GB seems somewhat underpowered, especially for a 64 bit OS.

 

Precompiled headers:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Precompiled_header

If you include large header files, like windows.h, that file gets compiled again and again without having been changed. So you typically put these headers into one "master" .h file, and make this the source of the "precompiled header", preventing it from being compiled again if the contents didn't change.

Both VC++ and GCC have support for precompiled headers.

oke, so these one of my problem in including header that makes my compilations get slower and slower plus my ram didn't meet minimum requirement for x64 architecture, got it,
 

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I find Java* based IDEs like Netbeans far too slow and heavy for some reason. Eclipse is marginally better because it has a larger amount of native code. Visual Studio is faster still because that is pretty much all native (has very little .NET code in there).

 

However, slow compile times are likely due to the compiler rather than IDE. Visual Studio uses cl whereas netbeans uses g++ (Mingw port which is not entirely native to the OS). I find cl to be a little bit faster in compile times on Windows so Visual Studio might be the better choice again.

 

Then again, nvi and Makefiles is all I use these days anyway.

 

* I dont know if it is the fault of Java or if Netbeans is just too overly modular. It seemed to be just as slow when compiled with gcj (native java compiler). It gives me motion sickness just using it for a few mins ;)

 

Actually most of Visual Studio IDE is now .NET and more specifically WPF ever since the 2010 release. Even the extension framework for VS is in .NET for VS.

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Visual Studio is a really powerfull IDE but I find it sometimes too heavy and not very intuitive. So if your goal is to make a "little" programming then I would suggest other IDE such as Netbean or code::blocks. In the other hand, if you know how to use Visual Studio I'm sure it can offer you many advantages :)

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