• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
tega12

My Games Design Portfolio

7 posts in this topic

I recently put together a games design portfolio showing the work I did in university. I want to get some constructive feedback on what is good about the site and my work and what needs improving. 

 

Here is a link to my portfolio http://tegaenajekpo.wordpress.com/

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Im not expert as Im in the same position as you but looking at it here are some things I thought

 

1) Change the "Welcome to my website". Its showing for me on three lines "welcom - e to my - website" and just looks wrong

2) Your home page is empty and Im not sure why that is. You need to put stuff forward immediately to get attention and definitely your best work

3) Your about page doesnt really say much. You should have contact details here, personal information, degree information etc..

4) For your CV, Your computer skills section is usually a given at this point. You also should have some project information. In mine I give a brief description of projects I have worked on and what my specific responsibilites were. Your CV also should have some information on your education

5) Some of the project pages need a lot more information. The game design documents are good (I think only made a couple myself in college) but withsome mistakes in them which should be fixed. But others are a single line with images. You need to explain the game and what you did in it in a lot more detail.

 

Just some thoughts from a quick look at it. As I said Im no expert as Im still in college myself making my own portfolio but thought Id help

 

Thanks for the feedback. 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I started with my normal review style of viewing the entire web site from a potential employer standpoint.  I started doing that, but then realized in your case there was absolutely nothing about your web site that says "Hire me".  Normally there are a few good things that are gems: completed games, excellent projects, transferable skills.  But in this case I have gone through the entire site and found nothing compelling.  

 

When I look objectively at your web site, this is what I found:

  • A home page, devoted to a single poorly-written sentence.
  • "About", which is two sentences long.
  • A CV page that makes me want to cry for your life story.
  • A Flash game project --- which would have been a logical place to include the actual game --- where you have three screenshots plus a fourth duplicate screen shot.
  • A "Game Pitch" for a Buffy clone, but is actually four sentences and a link to a PowerPoint presentation. Opening the presentation reveals 7 pages of fluff that you could have pulled from a few minutes on Google, and a single page "Game Proposal" that includes spelling errors and is rather lacking on details.
  • Three documents that were first-year homework assignments. Most look like they were the form "Here is your assignment, hand it in tomorrow morning."
  • And your ENTIRE Year 2 Work, which is a story flowchart consisting of four branches.

I could find nothing good about the site. 

 

I tried to find something good about it. I tried hard. I spent nearly two hours going through it, writing and re-writing this post, then deleting it and starting over. The content needs to be completely scrapped and replaced with actual content, preferably content that will help you get a job.

 

The only things I feel after carefully reading your entire site many times are a mixture of empathy, sadness, and pity.

 

 

 

 

So trying to be constructive, let's see where we can go from here.

 
 

 

 

Please read all the documents linked to in the forum's FAQ.  Most of the information applies to you.  Also, please read all the links under Tom Sloper's web site "Sloperama", as again nearly all of the pages apply to your career choice.

 

You chose to go to a game design program.  That program is not BCS accredited. Whatever your reasons for selecting the school were, you have completed the program and that is where you are now. 

 

It appears you are looking for a job as a game designer.  Game designer is not an entry level position. You won't get an entry level job as a game designer.  It is possible to get a job as a level designer, but the odds of actually finding an opening are small and the odds of your current CV being the best of the lot is abysmal. You will not break in to the industry as a game designer unless there is some incredible detail that was left out of your information.

 

After reading the links in the forum FAQ, you need to pick a job that is entry level. Make that your goal.

 

What job do you want to get?  Of the jobs that are a reliable breaking in path, I recommend QA. Jobs are relatively plentiful.

 

 

 

 

Thanks for the constructive feedback and the useful links. I read FAQs about the Games Designer role a few years ago on Sloperama. I read that Game Design isn't a entry level role, so after graduation, I've been mainly applying for QA Testing jobs. I read the FAQs about QA Tester and how you should be close to a developer or publisher to apply for a QA tester position. They are plenty of studios in London. London is a good location for gaming. I applied to Sega Europe. They had a few QA Testing positions. The location is a bit far maybe that's why they haven't taken me for a Interview. Headstrong games, is 20-25 minutes by bus from me and slightly mad studios which isn't too far. You say QA jobs are relatively plentiful, but it doesn't seem to be the case when I look at gamedev.map and look at the list of companies in London and the South East. Mostly it is for other positions some of the QA tester roles look for experience. Some of the companies in America I've seen post a lot of QA jobs.  With other entry level jobs, I read in the FAQs that level design is one. But it is normally a mid level role on the job posts. I had a intern interview at marmalade for a support role internship two months ago. Customer support is another entry level job. I've applied for a few admin jobs within some game companies.  Along with getting real work experience, I've applied for admin jobs and retail assistant jobs. I've had a few interviews recently with retail companies, Toys r us, Game. 

Edited by tega12
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I write that they are relatively plentiful, it means in comparison to other entry level jobs in the industry.

 

QA jobs are not frequently advertised, and they fill up fast.

 

Some companies staff up in a big push once per project.  In that model you have 20 or 30 openings all at once with a very tight hiring window, perhaps just a single week out of the year.  Other companies have a continuous flow of QA folks, mostly hired by word-of-mouth.

 

This is in comparison to other fields that may only have a handful (0-5) of entry level positions open every year.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I write that they are relatively plentiful, it means in comparison to other entry level jobs in the industry.

 

QA jobs are not frequently advertised, and they fill up fast.

 

Some companies staff up in a big push once per project.  In that model you have 20 or 30 openings all at once with a very tight hiring window, perhaps just a single week out of the year.  Other companies have a continuous flow of QA folks, mostly hired by word-of-mouth.

 

This is in comparison to other fields that may only have a handful (0-5) of entry level positions open every year.

 

Ok. So the best job strategy would be to just go to local employers and ask about vacancies or via networking. 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ok. So the best job strategy would be to just go to local employers and ask about vacancies or via networking.

 

No, the best [QA] job strategy is to send your resume to (or apply online at) the game companies that are within daily commuting distance -- and that you reasonably believe (from researching their games and their websites) might have QA jobs, whether or not they're advertised. AND to network.

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0