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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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farmdve

My opinion on game development after a few weeks.

18 posts in this topic

...it's very hard. I started with 2D and the most easiest part is drawing on the screen and making something move. However, as soon as you try to add basic physics(they don't have to be realistic) or other stuff like collision detection or collision resolution, it becomes difficult, you begin to see errors in your design that you chose in the beginning, but it's too late to fix it, so you try to get around it with some fix, but turns out the fix has a bug that isn't really a bug but it can crash your program, you can mostly handle it, but you really don't know if there are any edge-cases which aren't handled or if your fix even works as intended.

 

And it's also important to carefully consider if your map will be uniform or not as it directly affects performance and difficulty of your code and various other aspects that I didn't.

 

So yeah, game programming is hard, takes one to do it to know it even if someone else told you it's hard. Makes me wonder if I will ever be able to work with 3D game programming if I am already at my limits so far.

Edited by farmdve
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A few weeks is not going to do anything for you. Be prepared for spending years. Take it slow and be very patient.

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a 2D platformer, technically it's my second game, but for clarity think of it as my first, as the previous one I gave up on.

Edited by farmdve
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People work too hard on their projects.  I would just write a console application and start from there.  Too many hours learning an API just to display something.  I would try a more higher level technology.  Too many games that need near real-time responses.

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It is not hard, there is just an enormous learning curve depending on which route you take, also a few weeks isn't a long time. I think there needs to be more ermm positive stories on here, you know like people saying "man I love graphics programming so much, that I quit my job so that I can spend more time programming" or something, I am sure there are A LOT of regular people on this forum who once found game programming hard now get hard for it.

 

Oh and it gets 'easier' and if you keep it up, the enjoyment you get out of it will grow

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So yeah, game programming is hard, takes one to do it to know it even if someone else told you it's hard. Makes me wonder if I will ever be able to work with 3D game programming if I am already at my limits so far.


It is hard to do. But as you get keep working on it you get better. I have seen a pattern in my own programs.

First, I see something somebody else, or even a team of people, have made and it seems like it is way beyond my reach. Eventually I try to do what I have seen, usually leading up to it slowly with other projects. I don't always suceed. After multiple failed attempts to get something exactly how I want it, I get some of the basics working. I see ways I can improve what I have done and go agian, this time I produce something much closer to my original vision. At this point I have a very firm grasp concept on whatever it is I am trying to do and suddenly the problem doesn't seem so hard anymore.

Give yourself time and be patient and eventually what seems hard or even impossible for you now will become second nature. Edited by HappyCoder
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Do stuff -> Realize errors in design -> Refactor -> Do stuff...

 

I'd say that most design flaws aren't really apparent until you want to do something with a piece of code that hasn't been considered in its design. With that in mind, you can train your ability to foresee what systems could be used in ways you didn't thought about.

 

As with most things, it's matter of practice.

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That's why people spend 4+ years studying it in school before they become software engineers.  Have you tried obtaining formal education?

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You're biting off more than you can chew.

 

Start with Tetris, not a platformer.

 

Make sure you FINISH it.  Starting and giving up halfway through to start working on something else doesn't count.

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Don't give up. Stay on track. Don't develop a pattern of unfinished projects. When you finally finish one you'll be so happy for yourself for sticking through it. I've been working on a game off and on for 4 years now. I devoted myself to complete it. When I started I definitely bit off more than I could chew... but that didn't stop me. I was determined. I don't work on it every single day, and I'm an Indie working completely alone... but the more challenges I face the more adamant I become. I now have a working game after many years. It's so rewarding. Maybe when I'm finally done I'll share with the community here. My point is... attitude and intention is everything. Don't let a few little obstacles get in your way. Overcome them. You can do it. You know you want to.. otherwise you wouldn't be here and part of this community if you didn't.

 

We believe in you. Stick to your guns. If you have to take a huge step back and hit some books.. then do it. Do whatever it takes. cool.png

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Do stuff -> Realize errors in design -> Refactor -> Do stuff...

 

I'd say that most design flaws aren't really apparent until you want to do something with a piece of code that hasn't been considered in its design. With that in mind, you can train your ability to foresee what systems could be used in ways you didn't thought about.

 

As with most things, it's matter of practice.

 

You are correct. When I designed my code from the beginning I never actually thought about things as items(collectible or usable by the character), more than a single entity(i.e enemies or passive creatures) and even how these entities would behave simply because I've never actually done anything like that.

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After about 2 refactorizations of a project, then not working on it for 5 months, then completely starting it from zero, I was able to make a meaningful and useful design up-front about that project (knowing all the flaws in the previous attempt), and that project is a pretty basic stuff (an automatic test bench with basic pneumatic control, very basic data acquisition, basic user interface). It is simple but needs multi-threading, has to be very reliable  and the deadline is close, that's why I needed to design it up-front at all.

Edited by szecs
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It's a learning process that never ends.  That's not to say that you won't ever get there.  Just relax and work on that next roadblock to progress.  As long as it's not a primary source of income, your life shouldn't fall apart as you look for the answers.  I've learned / am learning that it's a "slow and steady" road to learn how to develop games.  You'll only fail if you quit.  Until then, you're still in the game.

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The point is for you to love it soo much that you don't give a shit how hard it is.

 

If you doubt yourself, maybe it's not for you?

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I think the important part is learning from what's gone wrong. Even big studios with hundreds of man-years of experience will look back at a project and find plenty of things to not like about how it wen't. The fact that you're having difficulties isn't a sign that you're too stupid for this, or that you're not cut out for it, it just means you've taken a journey into unknown territory and discovered a dead-end. Just back out and try another path. It can be frustrating, sure, but how many hard things in life can you expect to get from A to Z without making some mistakes along the way? This applies to life in general, not just programming. The trick, I think, is to find something you like doing enough that you're willing to put up with all the temporary setbacks. And it feels good to defeat those problems you've been having for hours, days, or weeks, when you finally get to claim victory, flip your computer screen two birds, and do your happy dance.

 

Besides, when you think about it, you often learn less from straight-line success than from failures. Experience is not all about knowing the happy-path, but also about knowing which paths lead to unhappyness. For example, if I'm sitting in a design meeting and some good-sounding idea is proposed, the person who's been down that path and can say with authority why its a bad idea is more valuable than the guy who's never ventured far from the happy-path and goes along with it because it sounds like a good idea. Success in most things is not about knowing where you're going, but knowing--or finding out--where not to go.

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