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Chirieac

Open world 3D game without a specific game engine

43 posts in this topic

Hi,

 

I've decided that I want to create my own open world 3D game. I want to do this in my own free time, for my own peace of mind. Is not something that I would want to sell to make money. The project needs to be more than just a game. It needs to showcase the beauty of my country, its landscape, its architecture and lost traditions. The world needs to be big (maybe 100km x 70km) and beautiful.

 

At first, I was thinking to use an existing game engine, so after a long search I've found four of them that could meet my requirements:

 

1. Unity. Affordable, easy to use and quite powerful. But, is too general and a lot of tools needs to be written. For example, it doesn't support big worlds because of the single-precision coordinate system. Also, from what I see, right now is geared towards mobile devices, so most of the focus for the development team will be there I think. I'm interested only on PC.

 

2. UDK. Not so easy to use, but is very powerful. But, I don't like how all of its tools look in terms of interface. Seems too old and ugly to me and I feel no joy working with them. If sometime in the near future the UDK will be upgraded to Unreal Engine 4, than it will definitely be in the top of my list from what I saw on youtube, from the workflow/interface point of view.

 

3. CryEngine SDK. Well, I don't need to say how powerful it is. So beautiful outdoor scenes created in it... But, I really do not like its authentication requirement to use the editor. What would happen if my account gets banned/restricted. Would I loose all my work? I don't want to take that risk. I've saw too many complaints from users.

 

4. Unigine Engine. This one is definitely expensive, but I've added it to the list because of its power to handle very big environments. I think is not really a game engine, but just a 3D engine.

 

They all have their flaws. Some too expensive, some have other plans than mine, some are too general. So I'm thinking, wouldn't be better to just create my game without an existing game engine?

 

These days a lot of big companies seems to create their own game engine. A lot of marketing seems to happen around them, announcing that a certain game is using this engine, another that one. It becomes the main selling point. Even a lot of gamers seems to praise a certain game engine like it's the king, without even knowing anything about them, other than how its gets marketed or how a certain game look.

 

The game engines seems so cool that, every now and then, everyone wants to build a game engine just for the sake of it. I certainly have that feeling too, I admit.

Right now, if someone wants to make a game, everyone will advise to just use a certain game engine. Do we really need to depend on these small/big companies to provide us with the tools we need? To wait for them to provide us with a certain feature? To hope that they will go in the direction that we think is right?

 

For someone that just want to make games, lots of them, and sell them, it would make sense to use an existing game engine. But what if someone just want to build only one game and wants to have as much control of it as possible over time, to be able to improve it for the rest of its life (or at least for many years)?

 

The way I see it, my game needs to be a virtual museum also, so it needs to last over time, to be improved. So, I'm thinking that maybe is a better idea to just learn to program it myself, from the ground up, using as many existing libraries as possible, like PhysX for physics. The rendering engine I think I would need to write it myself because I didn't found anything that could at least get close to CryEngine quality.

 

My question is this:

Is it possible for an average guy to learn what it needs to learn in order to create a beautiful game without an existing game engine? A game that could look almost as beautiful as CryEngine/Unigine capabilities? Speaking just in terms of technology, not the art content that contribute to the beauty.

Is it possible with so many resources/knowledge available these days on the internet?

Edited by Chirieac
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I'm not the best game developer, but even I know that make game without game engine will be to hard. Why? Game engine have made every hard lifting (graphics, camera, input and so on). You just need write your game. If you would want do game without game engine, you would need make graphics controller (how to render objects, put textures, shaders, alot of matrix calculations (yup, you would need really good math knowledges)), which is really hard to make (I developing small games for 2 years and just using 2D, because 3D is to hard for me now...). And all game engines made alot bugs, and fixed thems. You would do same bugs as them. So why to do that? Just take engine and make game. Sit and write what you really want to do: what game would be about, what features would have and so on. Then look what engine will be good for you ;) but I think most of engine will be ok. I would go for unity, because it's partly free (most of features are free). So if you would fail in making game, you won't loose any money (if you won't buy) ;)

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Torque 3D MIT is free and give you all the source codes. In other words try to grab a compiler, open up the engine and see how much work ten plus years became smile.png

 

Here:

 

http://www.garagegames.com/products/torque-3d

 

 

 

If you like a render engine only under MIT too then Ogre3D is there also with source code access smile.png

 

Here:

 

http://www.ogre3d.org/download/source

 

Have fun and happy coding smile.png

 

"A game that could look almost as beautiful as CryEngine/Unigine capabilities?"

 

No not really, at least not if you want the engine to be exactly as these two engines as many, many people have worked to get to the point as it is now.

 

If you only want the graphic then perhaps, but if the physics, sound, AI etc. etc. has to be a part of your engine too then no. The problem is also how much time you wish to spend on it. Grab a MIT engine and make it your own by tweak or just use it for what you like :)

 

Edit: thought the above answer needed to be included.

Edited by Dwarf King
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"A game that could look almost as beautiful as CryEngine/Unigine capabilities?"

 

No not really, at least not if you want the engine to be exactly as these two engines as many, many people have worked to get to the point as it is now.

 

If you only want the graphic then perhaps, but if the physics, sound, AI etc. etc. has to be a part of your engine too then no. The problem is also how much time you wish to spend on it. Grab a MIT engine and make it your own by tweak or just use it for what you like smile.png

 

I understand, but I do not want to make a game engine, the game itself will be the game engine. A game engine is more than just graphics, physics or the low-level stuff, right? They need to be usable in a lot of games, they need to provide tools for other people to use, easy workflow and so on. That is a hard thing to do that takes time and knowledge and many years to get it right. They also need to provide innovation to sell their product. Cross-platform too.

 

Of course, it takes a few years to learn and get the experience you need to build a 3D game without an existing game engine, but isn't that worth it? Is not like all the knowledge accumulated is for nothing. Also, is not like everything will be build from scratch. For example a free physics engine could be used, like Bullet or PhysX, right? Maybe other components also...

 

Now, I know it's hard and takes time and the advice is not do it and I understand why. But, is that written in stone? I mean, there is really no reason not to do a 3D game without an existing game engine? Is the knowledge present for everyone willing to learn or you need to be really smart?

Edited by Chirieac
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Being cautious of CryEngines authentication is admirable. It is nice to see indie developers thinking before being sold or locked into using trash.
 
Though Unity doesn't require a username authentication, it does still require online activation (even the free version) so is just as possible that in years to come you will be unlikely to use Unity just like CryEngine.
 
If you are already confident as a programmer or if you are happy with a steeper learning curve then definitely try out some of the open-source solutions like Irrlicht or Ogre3D. If you do need to use a proprietary engine, try to get a futureproof one (though without access to the source, I cant see how any engine is futureproof quite frankly) smile.png
 

These days a lot of big companies seems to create their own game engine. A lot of marketing seems to happen around them, announcing that a certain game is using this engine, another that one. It becomes the main selling point. Even a lot of gamers seems to praise a certain game engine like it's the king,


I feel your observation is spot on. For companies, there is a lot of money to be gained from selling products to indie developers (effectively now consumers). It is a very different situation in professional gamedev (and open-source gamedev) and frankly it seems sad to see potential developers stunted with products rather than actually learning to create a game themselves.

This is probably also why the modding community is dying. Modifying someone elses game / engine is harder than starting from scratch using a product like Unity. Edited by Karsten_
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"A game that could look almost as beautiful as CryEngine/Unigine capabilities?"

 

No not really, at least not if you want the engine to be exactly as these two engines as many, many people have worked to get to the point as it is now.

 

If you only want the graphic then perhaps, but if the physics, sound, AI etc. etc. has to be a part of your engine too then no. The problem is also how much time you wish to spend on it. Grab a MIT engine and make it your own by tweak or just use it for what you like smile.png

 

I understand, but I do not want to make a game engine, the game itself will be the game engine. A game engine is more than just graphics, physics or the low-level stuff, right? They need to be usable in a lot of games, they need to provide tools for other people to use, easy workflow and so on. That is a hard thing to do that takes time and knowledge and many years to get it right. They also need to provide innovation to sell their product. Cross-platform too.

 

Of course, it takes a few years to learn and get the experience you need to build a 3D game without an existing game engine, but isn't that worth it? Is not like all the knowledge accumulated is for nothing. Also, is not like everything will be build from scratch. For example a free physics engine could be used, like Bullet or PhysX, right? Maybe other components also...

 

Now, I know it's hard and takes time and the advice is not do it and I understand why. But, is that written in stone? I mean, there is really no reason not to do a 3D game without an existing game engine? Is the knowledge present for everyone willing to learn or you need to be really smart?

 

 

Gosh, man, it is no matter of being smart but a matter of amount of work. Is it possible to build a whole city all alone? without tools? Try it yourself.

Edited by fir
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Now, I know it's hard and takes time and the advice is not do it and I understand why. But, is that written in stone? I mean, there is really no reason not to do a 3D game without an existing game engine? Is the knowledge present for everyone willing to learn or you need to be really smart?

 

 

Why You want invent wheel again? If it's done - use it. Big companies spend a lot money to develop (hardware, ppl's too) for them self. But some of these engines are free or open source. So why bother to make your own engine? Yup, You will do it. Why? Game can't be without engine. You won't write whole render basics to every object different. You will make objects same (in parameters) that they could be used with same methods/functions, so if you this one method, you fix everything. That is engine! So please tell me, why you want create your own engine? Don't do mistake. Good game even with engine could take years, and without existing engine... even longer... ;) I would agree if you would be good game developer, which used alot engines and don't liked any of thems. So - create your own. Or find team and create. But now... For newbie... Just don't think that you could make job, which could be done only by big team ;)

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Gosh, man, it is no matter of being smart but a matter of amount of work. Is it possible to build a whole city all alone? without tools? Try it yourself.

 

I didn't say it I want to do it without tools. I understand your point, but is not exactly the same. You build a city and your're done with the tools, but a game engine is the base of a game, its foundation; once you finish with it, you're not done with the tools.

 

 

Why You want invent wheel again? If it's done - use it. Big companies spend a lot money to develop (hardware, ppl's too) for them self. But some of these engines are free or open source. So why bother to make your own engine? Yup, You will do it. Why? Game can't be without engine. You won't write whole render basics to every object different. You will make objects same (in parameters) that they could be used with same methods/functions, so if you this one method, you fix everything. That is engine! So please tell me, why you want create your own engine? Don't do mistake. Good game even with engine could take years, and without existing engine... even longer... ;) I would agree if you would be good game developer, which used alot engines and don't liked any of thems. So - create your own. Or find team and create. But now... For newbie... Just don't think that you could make job, which could be done only by big team ;)

 

 

I do not know why people throws the "don't reinvent the wheel" phrase all the time. We would still use stone wheels for vehicles if the wheel wasn't invented so many times. In fact, many times is not reinventing, but just redesigning it for a certain purpose.

 

I was under the impression that a game engine is what gets generalized from building many games, the part that can be reused on other games. I didn't said I want to make a game engine, but just a game. Of course it needs the basic standard stuff present in all the games, but that doesn't mean that I need to build a game engine to do that. At least not entirely.

 

Also, I didn't said I want to make the game now, when you say I'm a newbie. I've said that I want to start learning, getting the knowledge and experience that I need to do it. I realize that in order to do that, I need to start small, building small games and continuously improving my skills.

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Gosh, man, it is no matter of being smart but a matter of amount of work. Is it possible to build a whole city all alone? without tools? Try it yourself.

 

I didn't say it I want to do it without tools. I understand your point, but is not exactly the same. You build a city and your're done with the tools, but a game engine is the base of a game, its foundation; once you finish with it, you're not done with the tools.

 

 

Gosh II : "You build a city" ? try to build a city even if you have al vehicles and materials - you probably will do not build one house

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Building a game without an engine isn't "reinventing the wheel" necessarily.  If you can't find an engine that suits your requirements, you don't have to use one.  Sure, it's strongly suggested, but constraints are constraints.  However, in the absence of a game engine, you still want to use some kind of framework if you can.  Take something like XNA, Monogame, SDL, SFML, Allegro, SharpDX, OpenTK, etc.  None of them are game engines, but they will immensely help your productivity, because they abstract crufty work like setting up windows.

 

However, if I were to get to the crux of your closing question...

 

Is it possible for an average guy to learn what it needs to learn in order to create a beautiful game without an existing game engine? A game that could look almost as beautiful as CryEngine/Unigine capabilities? Speaking just in terms of technology, not the art content that contribute to the beauty.

Is it possible with so many resources/knowledge available these days on the internet?

No.  It's probably not possible for a way-above-average guy to make something look almost as beautiful as CryEngine/Unigine capabilities WITH an existing game engine.  It requires an immense amount of technical know-how, hundreds of thousands of man-hours, and skilled artists.

 

I'm not saying this to deter you necessarily, but you won't get anything that impressive on your own no matter what you do.  However, there's an ocean of space in between Pong and Crysis.

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Gosh, man, it is no matter of being smart but a matter of amount of work. Is it possible to build a whole city all alone? without tools? Try it yourself.

 

I didn't say it I want to do it without tools. I understand your point, but is not exactly the same. You build a city and your're done with the tools, but a game engine is the base of a game, its foundation; once you finish with it, you're not done with the tools.

 

 

Gosh II : "You build a city" ? try to build a city even if you have al vehicles and materials - you probably will do not build one house

 

A game engine is not just a tool for a game, that is what I'm trying to say and that's how I see it. But I guess you've just wanted to show me how hard and time consuming it is, so I understand.

 

 

However, if I were to get to the crux of your closing question...

 

Is it possible for an average guy to learn what it needs to learn in order to create a beautiful game without an existing game engine? A game that could look almost as beautiful as CryEngine/Unigine capabilities? Speaking just in terms of technology, not the art content that contribute to the beauty.

Is it possible with so many resources/knowledge available these days on the internet?

No.  It's probably not possible for a way-above-average guy to make something look almost as beautiful as CryEngine/Unigine capabilities WITH an existing game engine.  It requires an immense amount of technical know-how, hundreds of thousands of man-hours, and skilled artists.

 

I'm not saying this to deter you necessarily, but you won't get anything that impressive on your own no matter what you do.  However, there's an ocean of space in between Pong and Crysis.

Yes, I know that it's also the art that makes things beautiful. I was strictly speaking from the technical side only, but I think somehow you was referring to that also when you've said that it's not possible, right?

 

So, if someone wants to just make a 3D game that comes close to the quality of a commercial engine, speaking only from the technical side of things, the programming side and not art or other content, he should try and use a commercial engine?

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I am of the opinion that there is possible reason to write your own reason.  I wouldn't do it myself though. I prefer to make a game using something like Gamemaker or Unity.  I've also used Irrlicht in the past, and I've created a pretty simple wrapper for OpenGL as well, so I know a very small bit about it.

 

The best (and probably only good one) reason to make your own engine is for learning purposes.  I think the point has already been made about how much work it is and time it takes to make higher quality engines.  Assuming you make a simple engine, you would take lots of time, and learn something too.  But if you attempt to make something of higher quality and capacity, you will likely never finish on your own.  The reason is because once you finally get something done, time will have passed and you will be far behind the times.  Irrlicht is a pretty good example of this.  It has many good things, but then many things are behind, even now.  It supports shaders, but because it never got a good flexible vertex format setup, the animated models can't use normal-map shaders, because somehow the inner code doesn't calculate what it needs for animated models.  Also, it has next to no animation blending, much less a nice animation system.  Niko had been working on it by himself, and that is kind of the result of it.

 

If your final goal is to have a game, and especially so if you want a high quality game, you are better off with a pre-built engine by far.  If your goal is seriously to learn something, and you don't care about getting behind the times, or a final game as a result, then maybe you are fine creating an engine.

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If you'd like this to be your life's project, and you have a lot of free time... maybe.

 

But why making a game without an engine? I tell you to get an open-source game engine.

 

By doing this, you are not as dependent on the engine itself and its flaws and weaknesses.

If you want something the engine doesn't have, you simply change it, add the feature you need, compile the engine and use it.

Don't like how the functions work? Build an interface or even rewrite them!

 

If your changes are really for the better, they could even be peer reviewed and added to the engine itself!

 

Building an engine would really be a waste of your precious time, adding years of development to your project, so you can have a similar or even worse result.

As you're telling me you'll be using your free time and expect no return from the project other than the amusement of seeing it come to life, but still don't want to waste money on and get stuck with an engine, I see no other option than this: get an open-source engine.

 

Increase your own chances of actually finishing the project someday.

Edited by dejaime
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I think it totally depends on what you want.

 

If you want to make a game, then use an existing engine like Unity or (if you want the source) OGRE or Torque or any number of options.

 

If you want to make an engine, then well, make the engine.

 

I think writing your own engine has merit, if you want to earn the skills necessary to work on a project like that. I mean, someone has to write these engines, and its a great skill to have. Many AAA games use their own proprietary engines for their own reasons. It's not like every game uses Unreal or whatever. However, I doubt a one-man team could compete with the likes of CryEngine or even Unity. Though you may be able to finish something, just don't think it's going to be better then projects that had dozens of pros working on it for years.

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Gosh, man, it is no matter of being smart but a matter of amount of work. Is it possible to build a whole city all alone? without tools? Try it yourself.

 

I didn't say it I want to do it without tools. I understand your point, but is not exactly the same. You build a city and your're done with the tools, but a game engine is the base of a game, its foundation; once you finish with it, you're not done with the tools.

 

 

Gosh II : "You build a city" ? try to build a city even if you have al vehicles and materials - you probably will do not build one house

 

A game engine is not just a tool for a game, that is what I'm trying to say and that's how I see it. But I guess you've just wanted to show me how hard and time consuming it is, so I understand.

 

 

The problem "with engine" or "without engine" is secondary

because even with engine it is like you are a fellow speaking "It is impossible to build a city alone?, well, i am considering that" and of course you did not do a small booth for a dog.

So reading this (no offence) is like suffer a stupidity buzzing around your (my) head. You got small chance to make something like decent roguelike or quake 2 scale game, if you are genius  but the chances are also small 

Edited by fir
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Thanks for your replies!

 

To be honest, I didn't thought about using an open-source engine as a possibility. My main problem was actually with commercial engines that you can use, their binary version without source. Sure, their provide a plugin system, but in case that's not enough you get stuck and you depend on them to add/change what you want.

Maybe I had to be more specific in the title and in my first post.

 

Sorry if I've sounded like being "Superman" considering building cities. But, I admit that, as any beginner, when knowing almost nothing about what involves in programming a 3D game, I feel like I can do it or that is worth it.

But, this is why I came here asking for advice, to see what are my options, other than using a company's commercial engine, so thank you for your help with that.

 

Now that I'm thinking on using an open-source engine, it sounds like a very good idea, but I have 2 questions:

 

1. In order to be able to modify it to do what you want, you still need an understanding on how the basic stuff work under the hood, right? So, is it better for me to write small games without an existing game engine just to learn the necessary skills to use a better one in the future? Or, I could just try and use it without doing that?

 

2. I do not know too much of these open-source game engines, but from what I see in terms of rendering quality they are not that great. Why is that? Bad art, less powerful rendering engine, or both? Improving or rewriting a rendering engine to be more high-quality and close to its time, is still not a task for one person?

Edited by Chirieac
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If it takes 10 people 2 years to build a new engine, It's logical to say that it will take you 20 years (assuming you have the relevant experience/knowledge). However, that's only part of the picture - existing game engines are all based on previous iterations, and have real users who provide feedback which helps focus the engine team's efforts. You'll have none of that feedback, and will end up 'flying blind'.

 

But are you sure an engine is what you want? An engine is a multipurpose, reusable tool that provides everything you could conceivably need. Games don't need engines - if you're creating a Tetris clone you don't need to build an engine with mega-texturing capabilities that go unused along with multi-controller input support; you just need the bare minimum code to run Tetris.

 

Think about what you want to achieve, and only then worry about how to achieve it.

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But are you sure an engine is what you want? An engine is a multipurpose, reusable tool that provides everything you could conceivably need.

That is what I was trying to say. I didn't thought on building a game engine, at least not a multipurpose, reusable tool that everyone of them tries to be.

I just want to build a game without a game engine. Of course, that involves in building the components that every engine has, but if the base system has only what I need and is build especially for that, that makes it a game engine? If the so called game engine can't live outside of my game, because is the actual game, does it make it a game engine?

I imagine is a lot of work and needs a lot of knowledge and time/years, but it should definitely not be compared with what the big companies do, with an actual game engine, right?

 

I've searched around before posting this topic and from my understanding just because you've made a game from scratch, doesn't mean you have an engine. A game engine is the reusable, configurable and generalized part that can be used to make other games, right?

Edited by Chirieac
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I do not know too much of these open-source game engines, but from what I see in terms of rendering quality they are not that great.

 

Ogre3D is awesome. It is a very good rendering engine. Check out the demo on the website I linked. Torque 3D is also very good looking(especially with advanced lighting on). 

 

 

 


In order to be able to modify it to do what you want, you still need an understanding on how the basic stuff work under the hood, right? So, is it better for me to write small games without an existing game engine just to learn the necessary skills to use a better one in the future? Or, I could just try and use it without doing that?

 

 

Yes you need to know 3D math and be good at programming. You should start learning to program simple games first and then move to an Open Source engine, open up the hood read the code, play with the scripting language and level editors or what it now offers etc. etc. It is a long process even with an Open Source engine. But the journey is also fun.

 

 

 


I didn't thought on building a game engine, at least not a multipurpose, reusable tool that everyone of them tries to be. I just want to build a game without a game engine.

 

Also read this: http://scientificninja.com/blog/write-games-not-engines

 

Then it should make more sense smile.png

 

Edit: no comments below the article anymore as far as I can see :)

Edited by Dwarf King
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Open-source engines have excellent technical quality. Just think about it, a mistake on these engines would have to go through tens of contributors in order to make it in. Usually, the problem with open-source is finding one that suits you as well as Source Engine, or other commercial ones. Still, if you don't need uber-fast up to 50 player networking, advanced AI scripting, why bother? An open-source can give you the same result on the stuff you really need. Just have to pick the right one.

 

That is what I was trying to say. I didn't thought on building a game engine, at least not a multipurpose, reusable tool that everyone of them tries to be.

I just want to build a game without a game engine.

 

I see we are getting you even more confused here.

A game engine is a system designed and developed for creating games.

You can use a multimedia library like SDL, a physics engine like Box2D and ultimately a data storing, let's say sqlite, and on top of that build your own game engine. That does not mean your game's engine has to be reusable or it is not an engine, it may not be a super-reusable software framework or something fancy like that, but it'll be your game engine. Also, I would say you used 2 game engines, SDL and Box2D, to build your game's game engine.

Just that SDL addresses multimedia, input, networking [...] while Box2D addresses the physics, collisions, simulation [...] and your own game engine, using the other two, addresses everything from input to physics to loading levels.

 

Ideally, the time you spend writing your game's engine has to be minimal. This way, you can focus on adding content and quality to your game.

Unless you have technical requirements that force you to spend more time on the engine (see airplanes/trucks/trains simulators).

 

And as Dwarf King posted, Ogre3D is really good, I used it and confirm it. Still, if you want to look them up and choose one that fits you, go ahead:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_game_engines

Edited by dejaime
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But are you sure an engine is what you want? An engine is a multipurpose, reusable tool that provides everything you could conceivably need.

That is what I was trying to say. I didn't thought on building a game engine, at least not a multipurpose, reusable tool that everyone of them tries to be.

I just want to build a game without a game engine. Of course, that involves in building the components that every engine has, but if the base system has only what I need and is build especially for that, that makes it a game engine? If the so called game engine can't live outside of my game, because is the actual game, does it make it a game engine?

I imagine is a lot of work and needs a lot of knowledge and time/years, but it should definitely not be compared with what the big companies do, with an actual game engine, right?

 

I've searched around before posting this topic and from my understanding just because you've made a game from scratch, doesn't mean you have an engine. A game engine is the reusable, configurable and generalized part that can be used to make other games, right?

 

 

imo youre like diver in stupidity (no offence) - iMO it is totally unimportant if you will try to build a big game without engine, with engine, or with open source engine, because you will do nothing (you will not do even an one thousand part of nothing) It is nice to live in dreams, but I am not sure if you should confront this with reality if you wanna live in them because you will lost them so if you want talk crazy dreams state clearly you want to talk about crazy dreams not ask for reality. Dreams are not bad but it seems  that you do not want to go with a true way and state clearly that you do not know almost nothing (and take a book) but cheat and dream. its interesting to read about your dreams but do not cheat that you talking about the real - the reality is your keyboard and simple game you will probably never do (I am working hard for years to make some decent/fine small game)

Edited by fir
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Let me state clearly what you should be doing:

Year 0:

Install unity, or any other engine that lets you insert models directly and view them as is

Learn to draw

Learn 3dsmax or maya or blender

Learn GIMP/photophail or any other painting program

 

Year 3:

Create professional art assets for your game

The art assets look ok in a game now

 

Year 5:

View your beautiful world (that you cannot interact with, yet...)

 

But so what if you can't interact with it..

 

Year 5.1:

Show other people how serious you are about this project

 

Creating a game engine, then creating a game _AND THEN_ creating art assets that make your game beautiful is something that requires you to work full-time for years

Not to mention the extremely high percentage of people who give up before even getting started, and most of the remaining percentage who give up somewhere underways

 

Take peoples advice, and use something that exists already, focus your energy and time on something that doesn't exist already: Namely the art assets needed for your game. If you are lucky, after a few years of working on these assets maybe a programmer will come along and say - hey, these look really great, they look tailored specifically for a game and I can help you with creating it. Now you can collaborate with others who have taken notice of your exceptional work.

 

And let me put this clearly: Nothing says "I really want to create this game" more than actually creating what you set out to do

No programming necessary

 

Back in the day I made an IRC server (4 years), which no one used.. I made it because I wanted to create it

then i wrote a zelda game engine (5 years), which no one used.. I dont think any other game of that type has the amount of features that i managed to put in

but it became so complicated to use it that even I didn't bother making a game with it ;) (so what, I like creating engines!)

 

and now I'm making a minecraftian voxel game engine of sorts.. Obviously it doesn't even have a name

I just like creating game engines.. I'm on the second year of coding it, and I seriously doubt I will ever even give it a name :)

 

Do you want to create your game this much? That you don't care about anything else.. If you do, you can go ahead and create that engine, then the game, the art, the music and the sound. And that will be the correct decision :)

Edited by Kaptein
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Umm, honestly an IRC server should not be taking 4 years. A Zelda engine should not be taking 5 years. These sorts of figures are going to scare people away from developing anything themselves.

For 2D, you do not need a game engine (which is why barely any 2D game engines exist). For 3D, a game "engine" (i.e based on OpenGL) that is perfectly acceptable for an indie game should take about 2 months to make.

Artwork will be the main issue in creating a believable world. Unfortunately I (or Unity) cannot help you with this ;)
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Umm, honestly an IRC server should not be taking 4 years. A Zelda engine should not be taking 5 years. These sorts of figures are going to scare people away from developing anything themselves.

For 2D, you do not need a game engine (which is why barely any 2D game engines exist). For 3D, a game "engine" (i.e based on OpenGL) that is perfectly acceptable for an indie game should take about 2 months to make.

Artwork will be the main issue in creating a believable world. Unfortunately I (or Unity) cannot help you with this ;)

 

Honestly I disagree that it shouldnt - depends what one do,

The most time take the learning here not doing (writing). 

 

I got some framework for 2d games (maybe somethink like allegro but simpler) and bunch of some simple 2d prototypes (testing for ideas) and it took me a five years (but this five years involve also taking a ground up in general programming )

Edited by fir
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imo youre like diver in stupidity (no offence) - iMO it is totally unimportant if you will try to build a big game without engine, with engine, or with open source engine, because you will do nothing (you will not do even an one thousand part of nothing) [...]  the reality is your keyboard and simple game you will probably never do (I am working hard for years to make some decent/fine small game)

Please let me borrow your crystal ball sometime...

 

Anyway, thank you for your help everyone. I will definitely think more about using an open-source game engine instead of a commercial one. Good luck with your projects!

Edited by Chirieac
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