Jump to content
  • Advertisement
Sign in to follow this  
RoundPotato

[SOLVED] C++ compiling on Linux. (IDE for Linux)

This topic is 2123 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

Hi.

 

Just a quick question.

 

There's Microsoft Visual Studio for C++ on Windows.

 

What is "the main thing" on Linux that corresponds ? (I would think it's Code::Blocks but it the latest version seems to be stuck in 2012 and supports gcc up to 4.7 when 4.8.1 is out)

 

Thank you.

Edited by RoundPotato

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement

There's no such thing on Linux. There are a lot of good options, but no single option that a majority uses.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use CodeLite on linux (and windows)

It's a _really_ good IDE on linux, and (slightly less) good on windows.

 

For building I use my own makefile, since i dont like the system it uses for that.. It may be that it's actually good, i just didn't get it

It's also no disadvantage to know your toolchain well, so I recommend creating your own makefiles and so on :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi.

 

Just a quick question.

 

There's Microsoft Visual Studio for C++ on Windows.

 

What is "the main thing" on Linux that corresponds ? (I would think it's Code::Blocks but it the latest version seems to be stuck in 2012 and supports gcc up to 4.7 when 4.8.1 is out)

 

Thank you.

 

In the companies I have worked at (that developed on linux) there were 3 main 'development environments' for C++: eclipse, vim, and emacs. Of those eclipse is the only actual IDE but the other two are deceptively powerful and versatile. I have never heard on anyone using Code::Blocks professionally, but I have no experience with it so I don't know why that is.

 

-Josh

Edited by jjd

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As others have stated, things are more diverse on linux.
I personally love KDevelop for C++ on Linux (I used to use codelite.)

Edited by scniton

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Josh mentioned emacs on Linux.  You could try the CEDET module for emacs which makes it just as good as an IDE IMHO.  You can also download the emacs client for Windows which has CEDET preinstalled, in case you go that way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
At Ubuntu we encourage the use of QtCreator. Many of the more technical folks at Canonical (the people behind Ubuntu) use vim or emacs, but there are some eclipse fans and there are always a few more obscure choices. It's a very free world, few are constrained by the dictates of a single central authority.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We only ever use Vim at work but many of the students I teach opt for Eclipse-cdt.

 

That UML Diagram feature for CEDET looks really impressive though. Unfortunately I subscribe to the camp of learning either Vim or Emacs but never both ;)

 

As for building projects we find manually written Makefiles to be the only solution that works for every platform (such as fiddly build platforms like Windows Metro and iOS) but also often use cmake for development platforms to benefit from header dependency building (for quick code-compile-debug-repeat tasks).

 

Personally I find the fact that "Clean Solution" in Visual Studio doesn't actually clean up every intermediate file and the fact that upgrades from VS2005 -> VS2012 are very unlikely to work quite unacceptable. For quick disposable test projects where nobody can be bothered to create a proper build system, VS is probably fine (though I personally would still rather copy across a simple makefile).

Edited by Karsten_

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the replies guys.

 

Some of the replies involved some terms I'm not familiar with like "emacs". All in all I tried CodeLite and it is great for being lightweight, but I ended up With Eclipse(There was a specific package "Eclipse for C/C++ Developers" and installing it was as easy as unpacking, except for adittionaly installing Java).

 

Once again, thank you.

Edited by RoundPotato

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

GameDev.net is your game development community. Create an account for your GameDev Portfolio and participate in the largest developer community in the games industry.

Sign me up!