• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
EyesOfTheForgotten

Am I Doing this Backwards?

7 posts in this topic

Okay, first off, I've been trying to make games for the past 5 years, if not longer, and it's plain to see, I'm doing something wrong! (that and not enough motivation)

 

Heres the rough steps I take when making a game, with reasons why I'm doing it; If someone has any suggestions, PLEASE do so.
1) Get a general Idea; Write a little bit about it (If I write too much about it, I abandon the game cause of the complexities)

2) Do some art which hopefully will make it thru to beta stage (Since I've Never had a good artist willing to help, I'm stuck making my own, so I make some "official" art so I know that I can make the rest easily enough)
3) Spend a few days looking at engines to pick the one I want (usually it's Irrlicht or Panda3D)
4) Start Programming

<--Then I stop due to lack of interest or I never make it this far because of art, theres a few times I get past this-->
5) Make some more assets and add them into the game

6) Program some more features

Repeat 5-6 until I get what I'm aiming for; I never get to 6 because the "more assets" are usually art that I find a hard time doing and no one else wants to do so it doesn't end up so well -.-'

 

Any hints of what I may be doing wrong? other than loosing interest or giving up too fast >.<

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, art is a problem for most of us developers with no sense of it and ADHD as well. I don't have much advice to give other than to try to use some debug crappy asset till you develop the features you want.

Edited by farmdve
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have you accomplished anything ?  Are you trying 2D or 3D ?   I am assuming 3D by the choice of Panda3D.

You must have a generalized theme you are clearly interested in ?  If so, Press on building your art or 3D models tool box until and idea comes to mind.

I built a 3D Space exploration type game with 1 Player Ship, 1 Enemy Ship, 1 Docking Station.

My game Started out with exploring a section of a planets surface looking for randomly placed Clues / Plans to build other space ships or mining equipment.

  The mission was to assembly a set of plans.  Since these plans had to be assembled from the clues, thise gave me enough time to design other ships and build on my game engine that I had designed.

  So based upon your order of the game design process I Would re-order as such

 

1 - (3) Pick a language and SDK and stick with it.

2 - (2) Built your art work / 3D Models.  ( Vehicles are easy in that the need Little or No Animation )

3 - (4) Start Programming.  Every Program has a certain set of elements.  Graphics Intialization, Disk operations, Player input ( Keyboard / Joystick/\ / Game pad.  Build that and then save this a seperate utility program to add to or build on later.

4 - (1) Get an Idea.  Fledge it out.  Maybe work it as a table top game or something where you can see how it might work.

5 - (5) Make any additional assets

6 - (6) Do some more programming.  Even if you give it up, you have something going.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been like that for a while, and then I managed to finally finish a project.

Differently from the rest, this last time it worked out for me because:

 

A) I knew what I was going for exactly. I knew what start, middle and ending that I wanted for the project.

 

B) It was a project small enough that I could complete in the smallest time possible without me getting overburned. 

 

If you set out to make something grandiose or something without a specific, planned ending to it, you'll start drifting and will give up. 

Be realistic.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think I see the flaw that is hindering the original poster's efforts. Parts of creating something are the desire to see it brought into reality and your willful role in shaping it to your own image.

 

Follow up, so is there anything else you prefer to think about that may be distracting you?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, art is a problem for most of us developers with no sense of it and ADHD as well. I don't have much advice to give other than to try to use some debug crappy asset till you develop the features you want.

Thankfully, I've overcame that little problem. Art isn't a problem as it once was...sure HUD will be a pain in the rear, but I know enough to make the basic HUD and I can spend hours later trying to perfect it;


1 - (3) Pick a language and SDK and stick with it.

Basically it's Irrlicht or Panda3D, depending on what I'm aiming for; This newest project (lets hope it works out!) will be done in Panda3D; primary reason: it's the only engine I got to step 6 with >.< the only reason why that game was canceled was because I did a very stupid thing and told Panda to do collision detection using a ray-polygon with every polygon that wasn't the character...and that was a few years ago now...

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have the same problem with art. I cant draw at all so its hard to see the games come to life and you lose motivation.

In the worse case scenario, i would use crappy drawings in paint until you have everything programmed the way you want. Since you're just one person, do the thing you're best at first. That's what motivates you
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Since tha art is the bottleneck for continuing a project or abandoning it i would suggest using temporary art. I always say, if a game is not fun playing with boring place holder art then it will not be fun with amazing art either. Just make a some place holder cubes or download some more fitting art, you can even use commercial art temporarily as long as you do not distribute your work or do marketing with it.

 

When your project is getting shape you can decide to put in some good art, maybe the game has real good potential and you decide to pay for some good art.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0